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WAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

THE Z SMITH REYNOLDS LIBRARY 




1946-1950 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/minutesoforganiz4650libe 



Liberty Baptist Association 

North Carolina 

1946 

it ' "fr ; " it 
One Hundred and Fourteenth Annual Session 

Held With 

DENTON BAPTIST CHURCH 
Denton, N. C. 

Setember 24th and 25th, 1946 

it it it 

The next Session will be held Sept. 30th and Oct. 1st, 1947 
With the Wallburg Baptist Church, Wallburg, N. C. 



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Liberty Baptist Association 

North Carolina 



1946 

ft .ft ft 

One Hundred and Fourteenth Annual Session 

Held With 

DENTON BAPTIST CHURCH 
Denton, N. C. 

Setember 24th and 25 th, 1946 

ft ft ft 



The next Session will be held Sept. 30th and Oct. 1st, 1947 
With the Wallburg Baptist Church, Wallburg, N. C. 



2 



Minutes of the 



INDEX 



Committee Appointments , 14 

Committee Reports:— Finance 22 

Missionary, Associational 31 

Naming Next year's Reporters 22 

Nominating Officers 22 

Program 8 

Promotion Executive 23 

Reception of Churches 20 

Resolutions 31 

Time, Place and Preacher 31 

Directories: — Associational 4 

Choir 6 

Church 5 

Constitution and By-laws 3 

Historical Table of Association 39 

Map of Association 47 

Messengers to Association . 6 

Minutes: — Worn an s' Missionary Union 33 

Training Union 37 

New Pastors 13 

Our Home Goers 32 

Proceedings, Associational 8 

Reports:— Bible Society, American 27 

Cooperative Program: — Home Missions 24 

Foreign Missions 26 

State Missions 23 

Education, Christian 21 

Hospital, Baptist 15 

Literature, Christian 10 

Music, Church 29 

Morals, Public 19 

Orphanage, Baptist 9 

Relief and Annuity 12 

Churches, State of 30 

Sunday Schools 13 

Training Union 18 

Treasurer 13 

Womans' Missionary Union 17 

Statistical Tables:— 1. Church Membership, Pastors & Addresses 41 

2. Sunday Schools, Supts. & Addresses 42 

3. Training Union, Directors & Addresses 43 

4. W. M. U., Presidents & Addresses 44 

6. Gifts, Local, Treasurers & Addresses 45 

7. Gifts, All Missions, etc., Clerks & Addresses 46 

Visitors. 7 & 13 



Liberty Baptist Association 



3 



Constitution and By-Laws 

NAME 

ARTICLE 1. The name of the body shall 
be "The Liberty Baptist Association." 
OBJECT 

ARTICLE 2. It shall be the object of this 
Association to furnish the Gospel (as we hold 
it) to the people within the bounds of the As- 
sociation, and to co-operate with the Baptist 
State Convention. 

MEMBERSHIP 

ARTICLE 3. The Association shall consist 
of the officers of the Association, pastors of the 
churches of the Association, and messengers 
from the churches. Each shall be entitled to 
three messengers and one additional messen- 
ger for every 50 members or fraction thereof 
over and above 100 members. 

OFFICERS 

ARTICLE 4. The officers of this Associa- 
tion shall be a moderator, vice-moderator, a 
treasurer and a clerk, all of whom shall be 
elected each year by the Association at its 
annual meeting and shall hold office until 
their successors are elected. The duties of the 
officers shall correspond to the duties of the 
same officers in like organizations, or as de- 
fined by the Association from time to time. 
BOARD AND COMMITTEES 

ARTICLE 5. The Association shall elect 
an Executive Committee each year whose du- 
ties shall be to look after having the gospel 
preached in all parts of the Association, and 
to attend to all business in the Association be- 
tween the session and to make such reports as 
they deem advisable at the annual meeting of 
the Association. The Association may appoint 
or elect such other boards or committees from 
time to time as circumstances may require. 
TIME OF MEETING 

ARTICLE 6. The Association shall meet 
annually on Tuesday after the fourth Sunday 
in September. The moderator may at the re- 
quest of the Executive Committee change the 
time or place of meeting of this Association 
when it may be deemed by him not expedient 
to meet at the time or place appointed. 

(Article 6 was amended Sept. 6, 1944 to 
read on Tues. after the 4 th Sun. in Sept.) 
VACANCIES 

ARTICLE 7. The moderator in concur- 
rence with the Executive Committee may fill 
any vacancy occuring between meeting of 
the Association. 

AMENDMENTS 

ARTICLE 8. This constitution may be 
amended at any regular session of the Asso- 
ciation by a two-thirds vote of the number 
present. 

BY-LAWS 
No By-Laws adopted. This Association fol- 
lows Kerfoot's Rules of Order for Parliamen- 
tary Authority. 

Standing Resolutions 
ordination of new ministers , 

(As recomended by the Executive Commit- 
tee and Adopted by the Association. See page 
27, 1939 Minutes.) 

1. That when a church desires to put forth 



a candidate for examination and approval for 
ordination to the full work of the GoBpel Min- 
istry, an Examining Council be summoned by 
written invitation of at least one week in ad- 
vance from the church nominating the candi- 
date, the Council to include the pastor and 
one member-at-large from each Baptist 
Church in the fellowship of the Association. 

2. That the examination of the candidate 
be conducted publicly in the auditorium of 
the nominating church, and prior to announc- 
ement given in good time so that all the bre- 
thren who wish to do so may attend the 
examination. 

3. That we ordain only those who have re- 
ceived definite call to become pastor of a 
Baptist Church in regular standing in its 
Association which church shall have requested 
bis ordination. 

ORGANIZATION AND ADMISSION 

OF NEW CHURCHES 
It is recommended that any group of 
individuals desiring to organize themselves 
into a new church with the purpose of seeking 
the recognition of and the fellowship and co- 
operation with this Association, be requested 
to fulfill the following requirements: 

1. Notice shall be given to the Moderator 
of the Association of the desire to organize a 
church before any such organization takes 
place. The Moderator will then ask the Pro- 
motion Executive Committee to study and 
pass upon the need of and the practicability 
for such an organization. 

2. The location of said church shall be suf- 
ficiently removed so as not to interfere with 
the work or encruach upon the territory of the 
churches already affiliated with the Associa- 
tion. This will be determined by the Promo- 
tion Executive Commettee. 

3. Upon being approved by the Promotion 
Executive Committee the group will then re- 
quest a council to examine the church cove- 
nant and the articles of faith of the proposed 
church. It is recommended that this council 
consist of three pastors and three laymen of 
the Association appointed by the Moderator. 
Should this council approve the covenant and 
articles of faith, the group will then proceed 
to be constituted into a Baptist Church of the 
same faith and order. 

4. The new church, having deen duly organ- 
ized and constituted, may at the next annual 
Association present a letter to the Association 
asking for recognition and seeking fellowship 
with the Association, including with this let- 
ter a copy of the Articles of Faith and the 
Church Covenant adopted by the body, as 
well as a report of the work since time of or- 
ganization as it regards all phases of our Bap- 
tist Program of Missions, Evangelism, Educa- 
tion, Social Service, Training and Worship. 

5. The previously appointed conncil of 
three pastors and three laymen will examine 
the letter and reports of the newly organized 
church, and will recommend to the Associa- 
tion its acceptance or rejection as the case 
may be. (See 1941 Minutes, Page 20) 

RESOLUTION IN REGARD TO 
PROGRAM COMMITTEE 
The following resolution was offered and 
adopted: 

That the program committee consist of the 



Minutes of the 



officers of the Association, pastors of the en- 
tertaining churches and three persons, named 
by the Moderator during the session of the 
Association. (See 1941 Minutes, page 31.) 
RESOLUTION IN REGARD 
TO MESSENGERS 

Rev. W. K. McGee offered a resolution as 
follows, which was adopted: 

That the names of messengers printed in 
the minutes include only those actually at- 
tending the Association from the delegations 
elected by the churches. (See 1941 Minutes, 
page 31.) 

ASSOCIATIONAL 
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
(The following was adopted at the 1942 ses- 



sion.) See Minutes of 1942, page 38.) 
Your committee recommends that: 
An executive committee of the Association 
be formed of seven members, including the 
Moderator and Clerk of the Association, the 
chairman of the executive-promotion com- 
mittee and four other members elected by the 
Association along with the other officers of 
the Association: the committee to attend to 
aseociational business between the annual 
meeting, their actions to be reported to and 
reviewed by the Association annually. 

(This executive committee will transact as- 
sociational business; the promotion-executive 
committee will promote the interests of the 
Association and Co-operative program as 
formerly.) 



(All state addresses herein are North Carolina, unless otherwise noted.) 

Directory of Association 

Officers 

Rev. N. C. Teague, Moderator , # 3, Lexington 

Rev. B. A. Mitchell, Vice-Moderator # 1, High Point 

A. L. Snider, Clerk and Treasuror Denton 

Promotion Executive Committee 

NAME CHURCH ADDRESS 

Rev. E. F. Baker, Chm New Friendship # 5, Winston-Salem 

Dan S. Hayworth Abbotts Creek # 2, High Point 

R. L. Bostic Carolina Avenue Thomasville 

D. L. Tysinger Center Hiil # 6, Lexington 

L. E. Rickard Churchland # 1, Linwood 

A. L. Snider Denton Denton 

E. C. Haynes Erlanger Erlangef 

D. L. Owens Floyd # 6, Lexington 

G. C. Palmer Holloways # 6, Lexington 

H. L. Palmer Jersey # 1, Linwood 

Sam J. Smith Lexington Lexington 

O. F. Hughes Liberty # 2, Thomasville 

B. C. Cole Lick Creek High Rock 

C. F. Motsinger New Friendship #5, Winston-Salem 

I. G. Greer Mills Home Thomasville 

Jeff L. Carrick Mountain View # 6, Lexington 

K. C. Lambeth Oak Hill Memorial # 2, Thomasville 

F. M. Smith Pleasant Plains Denton 

J. C. Leonard. Reeds # 3, Lexington 

Millard Wilson Reid Street 206 Green Ave., Thomasville 

Willie Bowers Rich Fork # 1, Thomasville 

J. W. Byars Sheets Memorial Lexington 

G. E. Morefield Smith Grove #4, Thomasville 

Edd Fpps Southside Thomasville 

L. E. Lookabill Stoners Grove Southmont 

L. C. Carrick Summerville , # 1, Denton 

Add Cranford Taylors Grove New London 

S. R. Laws Thomasville Thomasville 

J. W. Tuttle Wallburg Wallburg 

Joe Pierce Walters Grove # 2, Lexington 

M- L. Craver Welcome Welcome 

The Moderator, Clerk and all Pastors of the Association Ex-Officio Members. 
(See page 13, 1933 Minutes) 

Associational Executive Committee 

Rev. N. C. Teague # 3 Lexington C. V. Teague Wallburg 



A. L. Snider Denton 



Rev. Chas. F. Leek Thomasville 



Rev. J. Roy Clifford Lexington „ _ 

Rev. E. F. Baker # 5, Winston-Salem Rev - C - C - Eddmger Southmont 



Associational Missionary, or other paid employees. 
Standing Committees 



None 
None 



Liberty Baptist Asso&iation 



5 



ASSOCIATIONAL AUXILIARIES 

W. M. U. Convention 

Mrs. C. B. Atkinson, Supt i..*:'.l'.,.'.Y. ...Erlangef 

Mrs. P. M. Hendricks, Asst. Supt ..' .....Lexington 

Mrs. Fletcher H. Wall, Sec- and Treas „• .'...Lexington 

Miss Beatrice Council, Young People's Director ThomasviUe 

\ (See Index for page number of 1946 Annual Probeeding6.) 

. , Sunday School Convention 

Rev. B. A* Mitchell, Superintendent # 1, Kernersville 

Mrs. Ida C. Nading, Sec. and Treas. •: :. Lexington Rd., Winston-Salem 

(See Index for page number of 1946 report.) 

B. T. U. Convention 

Miss Elizabeth Crow, President .>.'... Erlanger 

Miss'Lucille Hayworth, Secretary # 2, High Point 

• s (See Index for page number of 1946 report.) 

Baptist Brotherhoods 

Associatiohail Representative No church has a Brotherhood. 

STATE INSTITUTIONS 

. . .' Located Within the Bounds of the Association 

MILLS HOME, THOMASVILLE, N. C. : . x [" 

I. G. Greer, General Superintendent ThomasviUe 1 

B: W:Spilman, Chairman of Committee Kinstoh 

R. D. Covington, Treasurer ...ThomasviUe 

' Officers Baptist Schools, State Boards and Institutions 

• - •' . i; (Residing within the Association.) 

L. A- Martin, Trustee, Meredith College Lexington 

Dr, C- R. Sharp, Trustee, Wake Forest College^........ ......... ...Lexington 

J, A. McMillian, Trustee, Wake Forest College '.' '.....ThomasviUe 

C.. C, Wall, Trustee, Mills Home. : Lexington 

J. ft oy Clifford, Member, General Board : Lexington 

J. A. Neilsoni Director, Biblical Recorder •...ThomasviUe 

Church Directory 

NAME WORK CHURCH ADDRESS 

Andrews, Vi L... Pastor...: :..Churchland .# 1, Lin wood' 

Atkinson, C. B Pastor Erlanger Erlanger 

Baker,, E. F Pastor New Friendship # 5, Winston-Salem 

Clifford, J. Roy ...Pastor Lexington Lexington 

Combs, J. A ..........Retired ThomasviUe ThomasviUe 

Clark, J. B. , Pastor High Rock Mission Lexington 

Conner, W. H. , .Pastor -..Summerville Central Fa!s 

Dickens, J. W. -. Pastor Center Hill # 6, Lexington 

Dills, J. N. ...iRetired ..Southside ThomasviUe 

Eddinger, C. C Pastor ;Stoners Grove, Southmont 

Fiowe, Thos. B Pastor Southside, Box 124, ThomasviUe 

Gallimore, A. R Missionary :Lexington ...Wake Forest 

Hopkins, W. B Pastor Walters Grove...... China Grove 

Hartman, O. M. Pastor Welcome ,. Winston-Salem 

Hunt, Howard Pastor Floyd Star 

Jarrett, J. F. Teacher .....Center Hill # 5, Lexington 

Kyser, R. L ... Pastor :....Reid Street....... ......ThomasviUe 

Kinkade .Bill Pastor Carolina Avenue ThomasviUe 

Lanning, H. Otts Evangelist :....:Lexingtoh Lexington 

Leek, Chas. F. Pastor ThomasviUe ThomasviUe 

Lovinggood, Paul.: .Phy. Director..... Mills Home ThomasviUe 

Maier, F. r A ,. ...Retired ...ThomasviUe ....... .....ThomasviUe 

Matthews, L.-J :.Pastor.....:.....,U'n Grove, 2328 Gr'nw'y Ave., Winston-S. 

Mitchell, B. A.....V ...Pastor.... Abbotts Creek , # 1, Kernersville 

McMillian, J. A. ..v....:. ....Editor Mills Home... ThomasviUe 

Neilson, J. A. .' ..: Pastor.. ..Mills Home ...ThomasviUe 

Newton, J. D. . . : . . .Retired. ThomasviUe .ThomasviUe 

Oldham, David ...........Evangelist Southside ThomasviUe 

Philpott, Harry Evangelist .....Lexington Lexington 

Plowmsn, K. P. Pastor Taylors Grove ."...Richfield 

Roach, E. C- ... ,.. Pastor.. Denton Denton 

Sears, V. W. Pastor .Rich Fork ..... .J .ThomasviUe 

Teague,. N. C. ...Pastor Reeds ;.. .................. ^ ; ... , Lexington 

Thompson, Zeb Not Stated..,.. ..Walters Grove. ... China Grove 

Talbert, C. V .......Pastor... ....... ..Smith Grove Salisbury 

Young, C. S Pastor Sheets Memorial ..... .' V. . . Lexington 

(Ordained Ministers holding Membership in the Liberty Baptist Association.) 



6 



Minutes of the 



Ministerial Students Ray Yarbrough Sheets Memorial Church 

Conrad Lanning Churchland Ceurch Charlea Young Jr. ...Sheets Memorial Church 

BillEverhart Lexington Church ^ , . 

Ralph Rodgera Lexington Church Ministers Ordained 

M £°£ efield . Smith Grove Church Gilmer J. Beck Churchland 

Furney Baker New Friendship Church 

Stewart Helpler ^ Liberty Church Missionaries 

Gerthil Peacock Sheets Memorial Church _ A _ ~ „. T . , . 

Audry Smith Sheets Memorial Church Rev - A - R - Gallimore Lexington Church 

Assistants to Pastors or Educational Directors 
Miss Pearl York Lexington Church Secretary Lexington 

Choir Directors 

CHURCH NAME ADDRESS 

Abbotts Creek Carey J. Davis # 2, High Point 

Carolina Avenue Conley Thompson Colonial Drive, Thomasville 

Center Hill Mrs. Jacie Jarrett # 6, Lexington 

Churchland Mrs. Jack Lester # 5, Lexington 

Denton Mrs. Bob Carroll '. #2, Lexington 

Erlanger E. T. McDade Erlanger 

Floyd Rev. Howard Hunt #6, Lexington 

Holloways .... G. C. Palmer #6, Lexington 

High Rock Mission Mrs. Z, L. Morgan High Rock 

Jersey R. L. Palner # 1, Linwood 

Lexington Mrs. Paul H. Miller Lexington 

Liberty Mrs. Austin Sink # 2, Thomasville 

Lick Creek None Reported 

Mills Home W. B. Lord .Thomasville 

Mountain View Mrs. Lucy Tysinger # 1, Denton 

New Friendship Allen C. Jones #6, Winston-Salem 

Oak Hill Memorial Richard Jarratt Thomasville 

Pleasant Plains Howard Hunt # 6, Lexington 

Reeds E. G. Fritts # 6, Lexington 

Rich Fork Mrs. Hanna Eddinger Thomasville 

Reid Street E. L. Byerly Thomasville 

Sheets Memorial Howard Carlton Erlanger 

Smith Grove Lee Swinson # 1, Linwood 

Southside J. C. Creed Thomasville 

Stoners Grove H. T. Penry Southmont 

Summerville Mrs" W. H. Conner Central Falls 

Taylors Grove None Reported 

Thomasville Mrs. C. F. Finch Thomasville 

Wallburg Mrs. Ben King Wallburg 

Walters Grove Everett Pierce #2, Lexington 

Welcome Mrs. W. W. Brinkley Welcome 

West End Mission Ivey Brant Thomasville 



Messengers to the Association 

ABBOTTS CREEK: B.A.Mitchell, Carey J. Davis, Violet Everhart, Mrs. Bodenheimer, 
Ronda Green, Mrs. Kermit Green, Mr. & Mrs. D. S. Hayworth, Minnie Hayworth, Clar- 
ence F. Moore, Laura Moore, Mr. & Mrs. D. C. Bodenheimer, Sharyn Bodenheimer, L, B. 
Moore, Mrs. T. B. Moore, C. H. Bodenheimer. 

CAROLINA AVENUE: Elizabeth Wilson, Mr. & Mrs. C. R. Lanier, Gaye Lanier, Ethel 
Carter, Mr. & Mrs. Nat Buckner. 

CENTER HILL; Miss Elizabeth Hunt, Rev. & Mrs. J. W. Dickens, Mrs. Clinton Mabry, 
John F. Jarrett, Mrs. Hugh Miller. 

CHURCHLAND: Mrs. L. A. Freeman, Victor L. Andrws, Lois Swioegood, Mrs. A. C. Barbee, 
Mary Barber, Mrs. Snider, Peggy Barner, Christine Freeman, Paul Keeler, Annie Ruth 
Sharp, Mrs. E. S. Rickard, Mrs. Graham Barnes. 

DENTON: W. J. Walker, L. Snider, Mrs. H. M. Snider, W. H. Snider, Betrice Bean, Ralza 
Grice, Mrs. M. O. Grice, M. O. Grice, E. L. Gallimore, Mrs. E. T. Gallimore, E. C. Roach, 
Mrs. E. C. Roach, Betty Newsome, Geraldine Smith, Mrs. Clyatt, Mrs. J. R. Smith, Mrs. 
C. R. Smith, O. D. Carroll, Mrs. Ben Carroll, Val Morris, Mrs. E. W. Keith, Mrs. B. V. 
Morris, Christine Keever, Margie Snyder, Mrs. Pearl Andrews, E. F. Snider, Mood Morris, 
Mrs. Mood Morris, Mr. & Mrs. Clay Gallimore, R. C. Wall, Uzina Morris, Vannetta Mor- 
ris, Eli Tysinger, Mrs. W. T. Tysinger, Mrs. V. K. Skeen, H. C. Keever, Mrs. H. C. Keever, 
Mrs. Reather D. Lemly, Lina Gallimore, Mrs. M. L. Parker, Mrs. Ross Henderson, Mrs. 
O. D. Carroll, Lee Tysinger, Mrs. Will Varner, Mrs. Emma Buie, Robert C. Carroll, Dr. 
C.E. Clayett, H. C. Tysinger, Mrs. Henry Tysinger, Mrs. Clayton Daniel, Mrs. Joe Tysin- 
ger, Mrs. Lark Newsome, H. M. Snider, Fannie Gallimore, Mrs. W. J. Walker, A. L. Snider, 
Mrs. J. J. Snider, W. R. Snider, Ransome Hill, O. L. Wafd, Mrs. O. L. Ward, Blanche 
Peacock, Mrs. R. L. Surratt, Myrtle Floyd, Mrs. A. L. Plummer, Mrs. Pouline Buie, C. L. 
Buie Jr, W. H. Rush, Mrs. W. H. Rush. Mrs. W. H. Snider, Mrs. Bob Harris, Mrs. R. A. 
Allen, Ross Henderson, Mrs. Ruth Snider, Mrs. Eli Tysinger, Mrs. John L. Snider, Mrs' 
Will Harris, Mrs.Ross Wall, Olin Carroll, Lester Hedrick. 



Liberty Baptist Association 



7 



ERLANGER: Mrs. C. B. Atkinson, C. B. Atkinson, Mock Hedrick, Edgar Gallimare. 
FLOYD: Mrs" A. L. Floyd, A. L. Frank, Mrs. H. T. Hunt, H. T. Hunt. 

HOLLOWA YS : George Workman, W. E. Sherley, Grace Palmer, G. C. Palmer, J. A. McCarn, 
Arthur Warford, Lester Bean, Mrs. W. E. Shirley, Mrs. Arthur Warford, Mrs. S. O. Briggf., 
Mrs. Paul Palmer, Mrs. D. R. Beanblossom, Ida Beanblossom, Mrs. Roland Hedrick, Dot 
McCarn, Myrtle Beanblossom. 

HIGH ROCK MISSION: Mrs. C. A. Aycock, Mrs. Z. L. Morgan, Mrs. W. L. Bradshaw, 
Mary Lou Bradshaw, F. B. Clark, Mrs. F. B. Clark, Gerald L. Morgan, W. R. Bradsbaw. 

JERSEY: Mrs. B. L. Palmer, Mrs. Joe Pope, Mrs. J. N. Penninger, J. N. Penninger, R. A. 
Tate. Mrs. W. L. Roach, J. T. Barns, I. A. Sharpe, Mrs. R. A. Sharpe, Mrs. C. T. Yow, 
C. T. Yow, Mrs. S. A. Sharpe, Mrs. S. H, Sharpe, V/. L. Roach, Mrs. J. N. Penninger Jr., 
J. N. Penninger Jr., Mrs. W. L. Smith. 

LEXINGTON: Mrs. Will Owen, Sam J. Smith, Mrs. Sam J. Smith, Cabell Philpott, F. G. 
Mrs. S. E. Miller, S. E. Miller, J. Roy Clifford, Mrs. J, R. Clifford, Pearl York, Miss Roxie 
Sheets, H. C. Myers, H. Cloyd Philpott, B. F. Lee, Mrs. B. F. Lee, Mrs. B. F. Conrad, 
E. P. Cofield. 

LIBERTY: Mrs. F. E. Coman, E. T. Kenedy, Lacy Hnpler, Mrs. John Sink, Mrs. Haywood 

Lambeth, Mrs. Lacy Hepler, Haywood Lambeth, Mrs. E. T. Kennedy, O. F. Hughes, Mrs. 

Austin Sink, Janice Dean Lambeth, Bobby Buie, Douglas Buie, C. R. Lambeth, Mrs. J. L. 

Buie, J. L. Buie, Edmond Phil Buie, H. B. Buie. 
LICK CREEK; David Kenny, Henry McDowell, Paul Feezor, Katherine Feezor, J. C. Reid. 
MILLS HOME: Mrs. Paul Lovingood, R. D. Covington, J. A. Neilson, Mrs. I. G. Greer, 

Miss Sarah E. Elmore, Sallie McCracken, Rornedus Skaggs, Mrs. James Honeycutt, James 

Honeycutt, Mrs. J. N. Shockey. 
MOUNTAIN VIEW: J. L. Carrick, Hartis Wall, Mrs. Nan Wall, Mrs. Julia Carrick, Wilma 

Carrick, Stew Carrick, Johnny Carrick. 
NEW FRIENDSHIP: C. F. Motsinger, Mrs. C. F. Motsinger, E. F. Baker, Mrs. Glennie 

Swaim, Mrs. S. O. Hinkle, Mrs. E. F. Baker. 
OAK HILL: Mrs. Coy Kennedy, Mrs. J. W. Lee, Mrs. S. C. Beck, Mrs. Carl Trottar, Mrs. 

Ray Underwood, Mr6. Coy Gordon, Mrs. Rickard Jarrett. 
REEDS: Mrs. J. W. MyerB, Mrs. J. F. Koontz, N. C. Teague, Mrs. N. C. Teague, 

J. H. Myers. 

REID STREET: Holland Burton, R. L, Kiser, Mrs. Holland Burton, Mrs. Millard Wilson. 
RICHFORK: Gilbert Myers, Willie Bowers, V. W. Sears. 

SHEETS MEMORIAL: Mrs. J. J. Carrick, Mrs. Odis Frank, Mrs. Charlie Biesecker, Odis 

Frank, J. W. Byars, Mrs. Z. V. Fulbright. 
SMITH GROVE: Mrs. Grey Smith, C. W. Talbert, Mrs. Roy G. Orrell, Mrs. Otha Grubb, 

Mrs. G. L. Lackey. 

SOUTHSIDE: C. L. Everhart, Julia Beck, W. N. Parker, Henry Myers, Thoe. B. Flowe, 
M. G. Lony. 

STONERS GROVE: Hugh Walker, Cathy Edinger, Mrs. C. C. Edinger, Mrs. E. H. Wafford, 

Mrs. Joe Long, Mrs. Herbert Warford, L. E. Lookabill, C. C. Edinger, Mrs. Hugh Wrfford, 

Mrs. Conrad Warfford, Kenneth Warfford. 
SUMMERVILLE: Robers Bean, Mrs. Will Yates, W. H. Conner, Robon Bean, L. M. Bean, 

Sappho Yates, Mrs. Will Davis. Mrs. Robers Bean. 
THOMASVILLE: Mrs. W. O. Poole, S. B. Laws, Chas. F. Leek, Mrs. Chas. F. Leek, Mrs. 

R. S. Green, F. H. Maier. 
UNION GROVE: C. T. Evans, Avery White, Mrs. Cuie Huffman, Miss Veola Evans, Mrs. 

Evie Huffman, L. J. Matthews. 
WALLBURG: John Wm. King, MrB. C. I. Cook, Roby C. Clodfelter. 

WALTERS GROVE: Mrs. Millard Surratt, Mrs. John Yatee, John Yates, Joyce Ann Yates, 
Mrs. Paul Gallimore, Paul Gallimore, Mrs. David A. Surratt,, Mrs. J. A. Gallimore, 
David A. Surratt 

WELCOME: Mra. W. H. Snider, W. W. Brinkely, Mrs. Norman Pickett, Mrs. E. L. Davie, 

W. S. Disher, Mrs. W. Disher, W. H. Snider. 
WEST END MISSION: Thomas B. Flowe. 

VISITORS: Davis Woolley, J. Clyde Turner, M. A. Huggins, M. H. Kendall, Dr. Marce H. 
Lovelace, Claude F. Gaddy, L. L. Carpender, J. E. Miller, H. M. Stroupe, Mrs. H. M. 
Stroupe, Dr. G. A. Martin, Mrs. G. A. Martin, W. K. McGee, L. P. Beck, L. A. Martin, 
G. W. Davis, Mrs. H. C. Myers, Troy Cranford, Mrs. Otha Gallimore, Doris Lambeth, 
J. P. Smith, Mrs. F. A. Roger, Mrs. J. F. Williams, Judith Drotts, Mrs. D. H. Crotts, 
Mrs. Juel Sexton, Mrs. Clifford Hedrick, Walter Lambeth, Richard C. Lambth, Mrs. J. E. 
Lambeth Jr., Mrs. C. L. Kearns, Mrs. A. B. Cox, Jauntia Lambeth, Mrs. C. L. Badgett, 
Mrs. J. A. Garrison, Mrs. John Jarratt, Mrs. J. T. Barnes, Brend Spoon, W. A. Rollins, 
W. F. Wall. 



8 



Minutes of the 



Proceedings 

Of the One Hundred and Fourteenth Annual Meeting 

of the 

Liberty Baptist Association 

Tuesday and Wednesday, September 24 and 25, 1946 
held with 

Denton Baptist Church 

Denton, N. C. 

Theme: CHRIST MEETING WORLD NEED 



TUESDAY 

MORNING SESSION, SEPTEMBER 24, 1946 

1. On Tuesday morning, September 24, at 9:45 a. m., The Liberty 
Baptist Association assembled in its One Hundred and Fourteenth 
Annual Session with the Denton Baptist Church, Denton, N. C. 

2. Rev. N. C. Teague, the Moderator, called the Body to order for 
the transaction of business. 

3. The Opening Devotion was conducted by Rev. E. F. Baker, pas- 
tor of New Friendship church. The song service was led by Mr. Carey 
Davis. Director of Associational Music. The song used was "Come 
Thou Almighty King." 

REPORT of PROGRAM COMMITTEE 

4. A. L. Snider read the Report of the Program Committee: the 
report was adopted, subject to any changes deemed advisable as the 



meeting proceeds. 

TUESDAY MORNING 

9:45 Devotion E. F. Baker 

10:00 Report of Program Committe A. L. Snider 

10:05 Baptist Orphanage H. C. Philpott 

10:30 Christian Literature J. A. McMillan 

11:00 Relief and Annuity C. F. Motsinger 

11:15 Roll Call and Appointment of Committees 
11:35 Hymn 

11:40 Sermon .__„. J. Roy Clifford 

12:15 Recess 

TUESDAY AFTERNOON 

1:30 Devotion _ Chas. F. Leek 

1:45 Woman's Missionary Union Mrs. C. C. Wall 

2:15 Baptist Hospital G. W. Miller 

2:45 Baptist Training Union Mrs. Austin Sink 

Message Harvey T. Gibson 

3:15 Public Morals — Sam J. Smith 

Message Dr. I. G. Greer 

4:00 Adjourn 

WEDNESDAY MORNING 

9:45 Devotion Bill Kinkade 

10:00 Christian Education John Reid 

10:30 Sunday Schools Marvin Hedrick 



11:00 Election of Officers and Reports of Committees 



Liberty Baptist Association 



9 



11:20 The Co-operative Program 

1. State Missions J. F. Jarrett 

2. Home Missions Mrs. R. S. Green 

3. Foreign Missions R. D. Covington 

11:35 Message General Secretary, M. A. Huggins 

12:15 Recess 

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON 

1:30 Devotion Paul Lovingood 

1:45 American Bible Society __C. V. Talbert 

2:00 Report on Music Carey J. Davis 

2:15 State of the Churches B. A. Mitchell 

2:35 The Report of the Committees 
2:55 Hymn 

3:00 Closing Message__^___ Sermon by Dr. J. Clyde Turner 

3:45 Final Adjournment 

Report on Baptist Orphanage 

5. The report on The Baptist Orphanage was prepared and given 
by H. C. Philpott of Lexington Church. 

SOME FACTS ABOUT the BAPTIST ORPHANAGE of N. C. 

The backwash of war is presenting to orphanage workers some very 
acute problems. Among these are increased cost of living, the difficulty of 
securing a well equipped staff, the inability to secure material for needed 
repairs to buildings, and the still more serious concern of how to help meet 
the problems in the ever increasing number of broken homes. 

In spite of these dfficulties, we have had another successful year, es- 
pecially from the standpoint of income. The loyalty and liberality mani- 
fested by friends of the Orphanage continue to challenge the best that is in 
us. Such loyalty is the greatest endowment that can come to any 
institution. 

In view of the increased cost of living, our farm activites have proven to 
be life savers. We have been able to produce commodities for about one- 
third less than they would have cost on the open market. 

The figures below give an idea of the bigness of the Orphanage farm 
enterprise at Mills Home and Kennedy Home: 

Products, Barley, 2,670 bu.; Oats, 5,207 bu.; Corn 7,725 bu.; Hog- 
Meat, 49,018 lbs.; Eggs, 27,740 doz.; Milk, 76,002 gal. 

Vegetables of all kinds sufficient to supply our needs have been pro- 
duced in the gardens. The dairy and beef herds have been greatly improv- 
ed, both at Mills Home and at Kennedy Home. The drainage and improve- 
ment of pasture lands at Kennedy Home have made possible one of the 
best grade beef herds in the state. 

From a financial point of view Charity and Children has had one of 
the best years in its history. There was a big increace in the amount re- 
ceived in subscriptions, and in the amount of the commercial work done in 
the print shop. The total profit amounted to $8,348.63. Charity and 
Children circulation has reached the all time high of 36,000. 

The results accomplished by the Social Service department during the 
past year have been most gratifying. These results cover the services ren- 
dered dependent and neglected children in three types of child welfare; 
namely, institutional care, foster home care and aid in the home. 

A total of 700 children were under care during the year. 598 were 
cared for at both homes — 48 in Foster Homes and 54 through Mothers Aid. 
While the number of children in the institution was reduced by 6, the fos- 
ter home increased 24 and Mothers Aid 16. 



10 



Minutes of the 



Applications for assistance increased 7%. 348 applications for 837 
children received case work services. Of this number 122 new children 
were admitted to the care of the Baptist Orphanage. Through case work 
other plans were made for 18 families containing 503 children, leaving 92 
applications for 212 children awaiting further service. Case work service 
was made available to a total of 1203 children. 

As soon as materials are available we will not only need to overhaul and 
modernize a number of buildings, but make plans to erect some much 
needed new buildings. 

Friends from all over the state have been requesting the privilege of 
clothing children. A much larger number of children than ever before have 
been clothed by various organizations and individuals. Other children have 
been supported in full by individuals, Sunday school classes or other groups. 
Still others have furnished a little money each month to every child in cer- 
tain cottages. These personal attachments have been helpful; not only in 
a financial way, but it does something- to the children when they realize that 
some one is personally interested in them. 

Since it has been possible to secure a full staff of teachers again, the 
schools have been more efficient than for the pa3t few years. The daily at- 
tendance somewhat reflects the health and interests of the children in the 
two homes. According to facts furnished by Mr. Reed and Mr. Skaggs, the 
average attendance on the part of our children as a whole, has been 
slightly above ninety-nine per cent. 

It is rather significant and gratifying to report that we have in each one 
of the homes an ordained minister who has had special training in physi- 
cal education to direct the athletic activities. Rev. Cleveland Wilkie, a 
former Mills Home boy, in addition to serving and serving well, as pastor 
of the Kennedy Home church is also directing a most succssful physical 
education program. Rev. Paul Lovingood, who has had a number of suc- 
cessful years as pastor, school principal, and physical education director, 
was employed this year to teach and direct the physical education activi- 
ties of the Mills Home family. His program has proven to be popular, 
helpful and stimulating. The vocational department, including agriculture 
and home economics has taken high honors wherever it has competed with 
other institutions. 

Perhaps the church life and its various activities at Mills Home is, and 
should rightly be the most positive influence in the lives of our boys and 
girls. Under the leadership of the two pastors, Rev. J. A. Neilson of the 
Mills Home and Rev. Cleveland Wilkie of the Kennedy Home, strength- 
ened by the loyal support of the Orphanage staff these two churches in de- 
votion, contributions, and in Christian Training, compare favorably with 
other churches in the denomination. 

Respectfully submitted, 

H. C. Philpott 

After a motion the report was adopted. 

Report on Christian Literature 

6. The report on Christian Literature was made by J. A. McMil- 
lan, Editor of Charity and Children. On motion this report was left 
open for discussion until Wednesday morning at which time L. L. 
Carpenter, Editor of the Biblical Recorder, is to speak on this subject. 

ALL FOR $7.25 . 

The people of North Carolina have become a reading people. Literally 



Liberty Baptist Association 



11 



millions of them supplement their reading by attending moving picture 
shows and listening to the radio. People who live in deep country places 
get their daily papers but hear the news over their radios before the paper 
arrives. They also read and hear so many things that they become con- 
fused. There are so many strange and contradictory and misleading voices 
that they need something they can rely upon. They need a voice to guide 
them in the murky darkness of the day in which we live. In other words 
they need Christian Literature. 

The Baptist denomination is ready to supply that need. The Foreign 
mission Board publishes a monthly magazine, Commission for only fifty 
cents per year. This magazine not only gives a picture of our world mis- 
sions but also has a wise editorial page that needs to be read during these 
days of uncertainty. 

The Home Mission Board is offering its good services in its monthly 
magazine, Home Missions. This magazine gives a picture of our south-land 
in its spiritual, moral and economic conditions. Here again the editorial 
page makes a good foundation upon which to stand. The price is only 
twenty-five cents per year. 

The Woman's Missionary Union publishes Royal Service, The Window, 
World Comrades, and Ambassador Life. These magazines form a must in 
every Baptist household. The magazines are published from their head- 
quarters in Birmingham, Ala. 

The Sunday School Board located in Nashville, Tennessee, is not only 
ready to supply every need of the Sunday school and training unions with 
monthly and quarterly helps but also publishes a large number of very fine 
and helpful books. 

Coming directly to our state, we have the Biblical Recorder, published 
by the Baptist State Convention and sent out from Raleigh. The Biblical 
Recorder has had a phenomenal growth in subscriptions during the past 
few years, or more definitely, since Dr. L. L. Carpenter has become editor. 
The circulation has reached 36,000 and is still growing. The price is $2.00 
per year for single subscriptions, $1.50 a year in clubs sent in by churches 
or $1.20 per year when the church subscribes for every family. Certainly 
the Biblical Recorder should be in every Baptist home in North Carolina. 

There is also Charity and Children published by the Baptist Orphanage 
in Thomasville. That also has a circulation of 36,000. This paper in no 
way conflicts with the Biblical Recorder or is in no way a substitute for the 
Recorder. The Biblical Recorder is the organ of the denomination and car- 
ries denominational news. Charity and Children is the organ of the Bap- 
tist Orphanage and carries Orphanage news. Apart from Orphanage news 
Charity and Children is a digest of the religious thought of the day. Every 
week the very best editorials from the religious papers of the United States 
of the week before are carried in Charity and Children. Great care is taken 
to give the readers of Charity and Children the advantage of the very best 
religious thoughts of the day. It is recognized that Baptists cannot take all 
the religious papers while Charity and Children does take all and passes on 
the best from every one of them. 

While Charity and Children does not pretend to speak for the denom- 
ination it does support every institution of the denomination. It is a joy 
for Charity and Children to speak a good word for our colleges, hospital, 
and all causes fostered by the Convention. We feel that if every Baptist 



12 



Minutes of the 



home would open its doors to the Commission, Home Missions, Royal Ser~ 
vice, The Window, World Comrades, Ambassador Life, the Biblical Recorder, 
and Charity and Children it would be good for that home and if all the Bap- 
tist homes had those periodicals coming in to them regularly Baptists 
could lead the way to a higher spiritual and moral plane. 

All of the above periodicals can be had for $7.25. When the Biblical 
Recorder and Charity and Children are taken in clubs the amount will only 
be $6.05. We feel that every Baptist family and especially those in which 
children are growing up should have every one of these periodicals in 
the home. 

The best books that can be found anywhere can be found in the Bap- 
tist Book Store, Biblical Recorder Building, Raleigh, North Carolina, Miss 
Mary Askew, Manager. Any worth while book now in publication can be 
had from the Baptist Book Store. Finally and most important of all is the 
Bible. We presume that there are several copies of the Bible in every home 
represented in this audience today. We are convinced, however, that our 
people do not take full advantage of the opportunity to read the Bible. We 
commend the daily use of the Bible in family groups and individual 
devotional reading. 

We would not close this report without commending the study of the 
Minutes of the Liberty Baptist Association and of the Annual of the Bap- 
tist State Convention of North Carolina. No where in the world can so 
much vital information about Baptist affairs be had. We recommend that 
the churches of the Liberty Association use them for study course books. 
Respectfully submitted, 

John Arch McMillan 

Report on Relief and Annuity 

7. Report on Relief and Annuity was prepared and given by C. F. 
Motsinger of New Friendship Church. 

The Relief and Annuity Board of the Southern Baptist Convention was 
organized in 1918 with Dr. William Lunsford as the first executive secre- 
tary. Upon his death in 1927, he was succeeded by Thomas J. Watts, who 
is still serving, and under whose leadership the Board has been brought to 
its present high level. No agency fostered by the Convention, has made 
such progress during the last few years as has this board. It is filling a 
long felt need for a plan whereby our ministers may come down to old age 
without the dread and fear of financial insecurity. 

The Board has worked out apian with each one of the State Conven- 
tions, composing the Southern Baptist Convention whereby each pastor 
and the church he is serving can cooperate together. The plan provides 
that each minister pay 4% of his salary and the church 4%. This, with the 
amount thru the Cooperative Program, is building up a substantial retire- 
ment fund for our pastors. No church is too small to cooperate in this plan. 
The plan not only provides for the ministers, but for every salaried em- 
ployee of our denominational working force. 

In 1945 the Widows Supplemental Annuity Plan was inaugurated and 
has been approved by practically all of the State Conventions. This plan 
provides protection for widows of members of the Ministers Retirement 
Plan whose's husbands die before retiring under the Minister's Plan. In 
order to partisipate in this plan 1 Yq % of the pastors' salary must be paid. 

The number of members participating in all the different plans are ap- 
proximately 15,000. The dues paid in 1945; together with contributions 



Liberty Baptist Association 



IS 



from the churches, boards and other agencies amounted to $2,044,131.00. 
The. benefits paid in 1946 amounted to $862,272.00. 

So far as we can learn only 19 of our churches and pastors, in the Lib- 
erty Association, are participating in this plan. We hope the time will 
soon come when every church and pastor in the Association will be partici- 
pating in this plan. 

Respectfully submitted, 
C. F. Motsinger 

This report was discussed by Rev. E. F. Baker, pastor of New 
Friendship Church. The report was adopted. 

Visitors Recognized 

8. At this time the following visitors were recognized : 

Rev. Dan S. Brinkley, Rev. & Mrs. G. A. Martin, Rev. G. W. Davis, 
Rev. L. J. Matthews, pastor of Union Grove, a recently organized church. 

New Pastors Present 

9. Rev. Charles F. Leek, pastor 1st Church, Thomasville; Rev. E. F. 
Baker, pastor New Friendship. 

10. There were 17 pastors present at this time. 

11. Roll of Churches was made at this time. All Churches except 
Pleasant Plains and Taylors Grove were present. They were repre- 
sented by letter. 



12. Treasurers Report 

Money on hand from last year $ 25.22 

Minute Fund, 1946__ 298.80 

Special Collection.. _ 29.47 

$353.49 

DISBURSEMENTS 

Printing Minutes (1000) _._$200.00 

Guest Speaker, Nolan Benfield __ 10.00 

Mimeograph Paper 2.00 

Programs, etc 7.00 

Postage 6.28 

Typing __ 12.00 

Clerk's Salary __ _ __ 75.00 

Total Disbursements , $312.28 

Balance in Treasury, Sept. 1st, 1946 41.21 

$353.49 



Respectfully Submitted, 

A. L. Snider, Treas. 

Report was adopted. 

13. The song "There is a Fountain Filled With Blood" was sung at 
this time and led by Carey Davis. While singing, an offering was 
taken for miscellaneous expenses which amounted to $46.51. 

Report on Sunday School 

14. This report was to have been made on Wednesday but was moved 
up to this hour. The report was prepared by Marvin Hedrick, Asso- 
ciational Supt., of Wallburg Church and read by B. A. Mitchell, 
pastor of Wallburg Church. 

We wish to present the following for your consideration. Never before 
in the history of the world do we need to promote and urge every one to go 
to Sunday school. Let every one call on all churches and friends of the Sab- 
bath to reduce all labor as much as possible on this sacred day. The best 



Minutes of the 



way to do this is to see that every one go to Sunday school. In Nehemiah 
13:17 it is written, "what evil thing is this which you do, and profane the 
Sabbath day." But when we go to Sunday school we learn to keep the Sab- 
bath day holy. We believe that the Christian Sabbath observed and pro- 
tected by law, is the bulwark of the church, the government's greatest 
asset, and man's best friend. 

May we apologize for not holding but one associational Sunday school 
meeting this year. But we feel that this meeting was a success from the 
standpoint of attendance and the inspiration we got from it to carry on the 
Sunday school work. This meeting was held in the Mills Home Baptist 
Church. We had 22 churches represented out of the 31, and 166 present. 

From this meeting 5 teams of 3 members each were selected to visit 
every church in the Association. The purpose of these meetings were four- 
fold. Help the officers and teachers plan the Sunday school work for 1946. 
Encourage the officers and teachers to make the largest possible plans 
for 1946 and the future years. Acquaint the Sunday school officers 
and teachers with helps which are available to them. Help the Sunday 
school officers and teachers to realize the importance of Sunday school 
work. We want to thank each one that helped in this visitation. We know 
that it was worthwhile, but we are sorry that we do not have the gains in 
our Sunday schools for 1946 at this time. We do however, have the report 
for the years of 1944-45. In 1944 we had an enrollment of 6,272; in 1945 
the enrollment was 6,709, a gain of 13.2 pupils per Sunday school. We know 
that we have made some gains in our Sunday schools this year. But we 
also know that we have only scratched the surface as to what can be done. 
If every church member in the Southern Baptist Convention territory 
would go and help in the Sunday schools, their mission would be more fully 
realized. But we have 3,000,000 Southern Baptists church members not 
enrolled in Sunday school, which may become a menace to our churches. 
The efficiency of our Christian army is seriously handicapped because we 
have at least 3,000,000 unenlisted, unused, untrained church members. 
There are at least 25,000,000 unsaved people in our Southern Baptist Con- 
vention territory. 10,000 unchurched communities are still waiting for 
Southern Baptists to provide them with branch Sunday schools. It took 
an average of 22.8 church members all of 1945 to win one person to Christ. 
With this situation before us we know something is wrong. What is it? 
May we as Southern Baptists ask God to help us find out what is wrong. 
And then may we work to put every person in our reach in some Sunday 
school. Three million veterans have already returned to Southern Baptist 
Convention territory. If they are properly placed they will add new life 
and vigor to our Sunday school program. 

May I urge that the Liberty Baptist Association put on a full time 
Sunday school associational superintendent so that more time can be given 
to this great work; that every person within reach of our Sunday schools 
may be enrolled. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Marvin Hedrick 

15. Appointment of Committees 

On Finance'. C. B. Atkinson, Chm., Sam J. Smith, Paul Lovingood, 

W. H. Lomax, E. F. Baker, L. E. Lookabill. 
On Time, Place and Preacher: U. L. Andrews, Chm., Miss Katherine 

Feezor, C. S. Young, Mrs. C. S. Haynes, L. C. Carrick, W. L. Roach. 



Liberty Baptist Association 



15 



To Nominate Officers for Next Year: V. W. Sears, Chm., T. B. Flowe, 

Mrs. Austin Sink, Miss Roxie Sheets, M. C. Haislip. 
On Obituaries: E. C. Roach, Chm., T. W. McGee, R. B. Sheets, J. W. 

Byars, W. H. Conner. 
On Resolutions: C. C. Eddinger, Chm., R. L. Kiger, C. V. Talbert, 

Miss Louise Garrison, Mrs. C. F. Finch. 
On Program: Chas. F. Leek, Chm., N. C, Teague, A. L. Snider, B. A. 

Mitchell, E. F. Baker, J. Roy Clifford. 
To Name Persons to Bring Reports Next Year: G. C. Palmer, Chm., 

J. Roy Clifford, C. F. Motsinger. 
On Reception of New Churches: E. F. Baker, Chm., B. A. Mitchell, 

J. W. Dickens, Sam J. Smith, S. B. Laws, E. L. Davis. 

16. On motion afternoon meeting time moved up fifteen minutes. 

17. Announcements regarding the noon hour were made at this 
time by the host pastor, Rev. E. C. Roach. 

18. The Congregation united in singing "Jesus Saves", led by 
Carey Davis. 

19. Services were then turned over to Rev. J. Roy Clifford, pastor of 
First Church, Lexington, who brought the annual message. He read 
from Col. 3rd chapter. The Subject was, "Baptist Responsibilities 
in Meeting World Needs." 

At the close of this message the meeting adjourned to meet back 
at 1:15. Benediction by Rev. J. Roy Clifford. 

TUESDAY AFTERNOON 

20. The Devotion was led by Rev. Chas. F. Leek, pastor of First 
Church, Thomasville. He read John 1:36,37, as the basis of his mes- 
sage. The song used at this time "At the Cross" was led by Rev. E. C. 
Roach, in the absence of Carey Davis. 

21. Report on Baptist Hospital of N. C. 

The report on Baptist Hospital was prepared by G. W. Miller of 
First Church, Lexington, and was read by Rev. E. C. Roach of Denton 
Church in the absence of Bro. Miller. 

Our Baptist Hospital has had another full and fruitful year. In the 
past few years its facilities to care for the sick have been greatly increased. 
This is true for both those who do not have the money to pay for complete 
hospital care and those who have complicated afflictions which the hospitals 
and doctors in most communities are not prepared to care for. 

The Out-Patient Clinic is now working in its enlarged and better 
equipped quarters. It is prepared to do the highest type of work of exam- 
ining the sick, prescribing treatment for their ills, and giving some special- 
ized treatments. After the examination, most of these can be treated back 
home by a local doctor or in a local hospital. There is now being added to 
the clinic additional services in psychiatry and in eye and dental diseases. 
The cost for an examination in the Out-Patient Clinic is $5.00, not includ- 
ing X-ray pictures and special laboratory tests, for all who are able to pay. 
This just about covers the actual cost to the hospital for the examination. 
The charges for the X-ray picture and special tests are estimated at actual 
cost. Most people are able to pay these fees, the balance is paid out of 
the Mother's Day Offering. 

Along with the Out-Patient Clinic, there is operated a Private Clinic 
for those who are able to pay the regular standard fees for medical care. 



16 



Minnies of the 



The sick who come to these clinics and need to enter the Baptist Hos- 
pital for treatment are then admitted as bed patients, in so far as room 
permits. Due to lack of space, it is impossible for the hospital to take care 
of all who need to be admitted. Because of this lack of space, our hospital 
has available a great deal of the finest medical skill which it is not able to 
use to reieve suffering. 

The Mother's Day Offering enables our hospital to care for those who 
do not have the money to pay their full bills. Those who are able to pay 
in full are expected to do so, because, if they fail it will take help from 
those who are in actual need. No person who is examined in the Out-Pa- 
tient Clinic and no service patient who is admitted to the hospital is charged 
any doctor's bill at all, whether or not he pays his hospital bill. More than 
half of those who are cared for by our hospital are such service patients, 
and many of them are unable to pay any thing at all. Our hospital does 
far more free service for the poor than any other denominational hospital 
in the South and stands among the first in America in the amount it does. 
Last year this free service cost the hospital over $167,000. We are happy 
that the churches of our association had a large share through our Mother's 
Day Offering in this great service. 

Our Baptist Hospital operates one of the best schools of nursing in the 
South. It seeks the finest young women, mentally, physically, and spirit- 
ually, to train for a Christian ministry of healing. It invites young women 
from our Baptist homes and churcher who are interested in giving their 
lives to this important profession to consider going there for their training. 
The need for nurses is urgent. Any girl 18 years of age or over, with high 
school education or better, is eligible to apply. She should write the Direc- 
tor, Nursing Department, North Carolina Baptist Hospital, Winston- 
Salem, N. C. 

The new Department of Religion at our Baptist Hospital is being 
organized to render an effective spiritual ministry. This includes visitation 
and council among the sick and burdened in the hospital, Bible instruction 
and a religious program for students, the effort to help create a Christian 
spirit thru all the work of the hospital, and carrying to our churches the 
information concerning the work of our hospital. The ministry of this de- 
partment is recognized by all connected with the hospital as an important 
part of the work. ( 

The urgent and outstanding need of our Baptist Hospital is the construc- 
tion of a new south wing. This would provide 140 new beds, which we so great- 
ly need, especially to care for the more seriouly ill who need private rooms. 
Additional operating and delivery rooms and X-ray facilities would be in- 
cluded. It would provide adequate kitchen and storage room, where the 
hospital is now handicapped for lack of space. Also, it would provide for a 
laundry. It now costs the hospital over $50,000 a year to get its laundry 
done outside. The new wing would greatly increase the service of our hos- 
pital to the sick and would enable it to increase its income. 

The cost of the new south wing would be close to a million dollars. 
One gift of $200,000 already has been offered toward this, provided the 
construction is approved this year. Many who have been to our hospital 
as patients, or to take patients, know how badly this additional room is 
needed. The advisability of permitting the hospital to construct this build- 
ing will be considered by our Baptist State Convention in its sessions at 
Asheville in November. The messengers from our Association to the State 



Liberty Baptist Association 



17 



Convention will have opportunity to vote their approval of this addition. 
Respectfully Submitted, 

G. W. Miller 

On motion the report was adopted and discussed by Rev. W. K. 
McGee of the Baptist Hospital, who gave a wonderful report on "This 
Our Baptist Hospital." 

22. At this time L. P. Beck from Wingate Jr. College was recognized. 

23. The report on the Woman's Missionary Union was prepared and 
given by Mrs. C. C. Wall of First Church, Lexington. 

Report of Woman's Missionary Union 

The past year has been one of unprecedented challenges. Southern Bap- 
tists have closed the first hundred years of their history and begun a new 
century; World War II has ended; countries closed to our Missionaries have 
been opened; the calls from starving, sin-sick people — have brought ap- 
peal and challenge to our hearts. North Carolina Woman's Missionary 
Union has been swift to respond to the call for World Relief. 

Our own Liberty Woman's Missionary Union rejoices to have had a part 
in the work of relief and in the promotion of missions to the ends of the earth. 

Reports for the year 1945 show that, as an Association we have made 
a steady increase in every phase of our work. We did not reach the 20% 
Centennial Goal, tho our financial increase was more than 15%. Twenty 
two societies maintained the A-l grade during the year. We lacked only 
one point being an A-l Association. Honorable mention is given to New 
Friendship for the 12th year, maintaining the A-l grade, Mills Home and 
New Friendship for having received a missionary gift from every resident 
woman member of their church. 

The 1945 gifts to Special Offerings were: 

Annie Armstrong Home Mission Offering $ 848.65 



Heck Memorial Offering „ 436.85 

State Mission Offering 271.35 

Lottie Moon Foreign Mission Offering 1,482.95 

TOTAL ..$3,339.80 

Gifts to Co-operative Program $ 6,719.21 

Gifts to World Relief 333.24 

Centennial Offering ._. 229.45 

Other Objects 2,472.41 

GRAND TOTAL $13,094.11 



In July 1945 Miss Beatrice Council, our efficient Young People's Lea- 
der, held a Camp Rally at Rich Fork church. Mission Study, inspirational 
talks, and fellowship were enjoyed by a large group of young people and 
their counselors. These young people are our leaders of tomorrow and chal- 
lenge us to give them our best in consecrated leadership and Missionary 
Education. We need to pray that they may hear and answer God's call. 

"A great door and effectual is open unto us, and there are many adver- 
saries" — Depending upon our heavenly Father for guidance to meet every 
need, let us dedicate our selves to the furtherance of the Gospel. 
Respectfully submitted, 

Mrs. C. C. Wall 

This report was discussed by Mrs. C. B. Atkinson of Erlanger 
Church, Associational W. M. U. Superintendent. 

24. At this time the Association stood and was led in prayer by Rev. 
H. M. Stroupe of Franklin Heights Baptist Church, Kannapolis, a 
former pastor of Denton, thanking God for the progress made in the 
Denton Baptist Church in the last 50 years, having met with the 
Denton Church then (1896) for the first time. 



18 



Minutes of the 



25. The report on the Training Union was prepared and given by 
Mrs. Austin Sink of Liberty Church. 

Report of Training Union 

The goal we have been striving to reach in the past year's work in the 
Liberty Association Training Union are as follows: 

1. Organize new Training Unions; 2. Promote better weeky programs; 
3. Better train our people by promoting study courses; 4. To make Jesus 
Christ the center of every Training Union activity. 

Since our last report New Friendship and Summerville have organized 
active Training Unions with directors and all departments of the work. 
Training Unions are functioning each Sunday night in 19 of our churches 
with a total of 94 Unions, including 14 Adult, 15 Young People's, 29 Inter- 
mediate, 25 Junior Unions, and 13 Story Hour Groups. 

Our goals for the year were 2 new Training Unions; 3 adult, 2 young peo- 
people's, 2 intermediate, 4 junior unions, and 3 story hours; 700 study 
course awards with the association being standard for the year. 

Executive committee meetings were held and well attended. Very 
helpful and inspiring programs were presented through-out the year. 

The week of July 14, an enlargement campaign was held in 13 of our 
churches with an average attendance of 786. The week's work was direct- 
ed by our state director, Harvey T. Gibson, and by 20 outside assistants. 

On March 24, at Rich Fork church, the elimination contest were held 
with the following contestants as winners: 

Junior Memory Work Drill— Raymond Ball, Mary Ann Johnson, Jojr 
Marshall, Gail Ball, and Frances King, Mills Home 

Intermediate Sword Drill— Mary Alice Wilson, 1st Church, Lexington. 

Better Speakers Tourament— Catherine Greer, 1st Church, Lexington. 

Adult Scripture Reading— Miss Hazel Grady, 1st Church, Lexington. 

Hymn Festival— Junior Choir, 1st Church, Lexington. 

The winners of this meeting participated in the regional contest held 
April 25-26 at First Church, Lexington, with Miss Hazel Grady as winner 
in the Scripture Reading, and Raymond Ball, Mary Ann Johnson, Frances 
King, Joy Marshall, and Grail Ball winners in the Junior Memory Work. 
These participated in the state contest at Ridgeorest with Raymond Ball, 
Grail Ball and Frances King as winners there in the Junior Memory Work. 
We thank them for their fine preformances. 

December 7, at Mills Home church we observed South-wide Simultan- 
eous Associational Night with an attendance of 147. A challenging play, 
"Call of the New Baptist Century," was presented by Mills Home church. 

As we go forward in this new year's work, may we see the needs and 
be about them. If we follow His Will then so much will be accomplished. 
Thy will be done in every church Redeemed by Christ our Lord; 
God help us win and teach and train According to Thy Word. 
Thy will be done, dear Father! Almighty God Thou art! 
O let Thy love and beauty reign Supreme in every heart. 

Respectfully Submitted, — B. B. McKinney 
Mrs. Austin Sink 

This report was discussed by Bro. Harvey Gibson of RaJiegh. His 
slogan suggested that every church adopt a church that has no Train- 
ing Union to establish a Union. The report was adopted. 

26. At this time, "Jesus Keep Me Near The Cross/' was sung, led 
by Rev. E. C. Roach. 



Liberty Baptist Association 



19 



27. The report on Public Morals was prepared and presented by 
Sam J. Smith, First Church, Lexington. 

Report on Public Morals 

The evil forces them selves and the people aligned with evil can not be 
expected to eradicate evil from our society, or mend our public morals. 

The liquor industry and those connected with it and those drinking it 
can not be expected to banish it from our state. 

The liquor industry will only be satisfied: 

"When every boy is so engulfed in the drink habit, that he cares for 
little else; when every girl is a debauched harlot, who will sell her self for 
another drink; when every husband cares for the bottle more he does for 
his wife; when every wife forsakes her home for the cocktail lounge or beer 
parlor; when every home has alcohol in the refrigerator and on the table; 
when children are taught to drink from their youth up; when they control 
government and bend it to their own uses; when all the churches have com- 
promised and the preachers are afraid to speak the truth ; when schools are 
used to teach children that drinking is a smart trait; when every thing and 
every body in this country have come under their influence, then and only 
then will the liquor industry be satisfied." 

If liquor with all its evil forces and crimes as a result of it, are to be 
removed from the borders of our state and nation, who must do it? It 
must be done by the preachers and church members of our state and nation. 
Already too many churches have compromised, and too many preachers are 
afraid to speak the truth. The preachers and we church members are sup- 
posed to be the salt of the earth "But if the salt has lost its savour where 
with shall it (the earth) be salted?" 

In our state and nation liquor is evil No. 1. Do we treat it as such? 
We do not. We could banish it and most all the evils caused by it from 
our state, if we were not afraid we might offend some of our fellow church 
members. This responsibility belongs to all churches and denominations. 

But let us think about the responsibility that is ours as Baptists. 
Baptists alone, with out the help of other denominations should free our 
state from the curse of liquor. The responsibility lies at our feet as church 
members and preachers. I say this because Baptists alone are so numerous 
in the state that they could easily elect dry men in every county and to the 
state legislature, who would see that liquor stores were driven from the state. 

I do not say it in a spirit of criticism, but if every Baptist preacher 
would expose fearlessly and unafraid the liquor industry and its damnable 
results for the next three months, I dare say the next legislature would 
give the people of the state a cluince to vote the State dry. 

The officials of our orphanage at Thomasville tell me that more than 
half the children in that institution are there as a result of liquor. 

Through the whole catalog of crime we find liquor cause No. 1. For 
neglect of our duty in failing to remove this cause; I say we as Baptists are 
guilty as an accessory before the fact of all the crimes caused by it and as 
a result of it. 

William McKinley once said, "By legalizing this traffic we agree to share 
with the liquor seller the responsibilities and evils of his business. Every 
one who votes for license, becomes of necessity a pardner of the liquor 
traffic and all its consequences." 

We are responsible for our acts of commission as well as acts of omis- 
sion. We are commanded to care for our widows and orphans, but no where 



20 



Minutes of the 



in the Bible are we told to be a party to making widows and orphans. We 
have not done anything for God in taking care of orphans that have been 
caused by our acts of commission or omission. 

The laws of our state say it is lawful to sell a man liquor. With it 
he becomes drunk. Because he is drunk he kills his wife, or commits some 
other serious crime. The laws of our state say he had no right to kill his 
wife. For this the law sends him to the Pen. for life, this leaves five orph- 
aned children. The state says it is not its duty to take care of the orph- 
ans. That is the duty of the churches. What caused all this? The law 
permitting the sale of the liquor caused it. 

Who made the law permiting sale of the liquor? The members of the 
state legislature. Who elected these men? The Baptists of our state cast 
nearly one-half of the votes that elected them. We are therefore, respon- 
sible as an accessory before the fact for crimes resulting from legal liquor. 

We are not only guilty as a denomination but as individuals also, both 
layman and preacher. Our skirts are stained with blood, grief, sorrow and 
shame. 

In my dreams I stood as one in a great host of 500,000 North Carolina 
Baptists. In front of this great host stood the pastors of the 3,000 Baptist 
churches in the state. As we stood I heard a loud voice coming from on 
High, saying; "You have failed me." Then I heard one of the pastors cry 
out; "Wherein have we failed Thee." Then the voice from on High replied, 
"In that your acts of commission and omission are responsible for the 
crimes and suffering caused by liquor in your state. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Sam J. Smith 

The report was discussed by L. A. Martin, head of the Allied 
League of North Carolina, who also introduced the speaker, Rev. 
W. A, Rollings of the First Methodist Church, Lexington, who gave 
us some very interesting facts on Public Morals and Temperance. 

28. Rev. E. F. Baker, chairman of committee on Reception of New 
Churches, makes report at this time. 

Committee Report on Reception of Churches 

The committee upon investigation found that the members of the pro- 
posed church, Union Grove, have complied with the proper requirements 
for admission as a new church into the Association. The committee unan- 
imously recommends that Union Grove be received into full fellowship with 
the Liberty Baptist Association. 

This report was adopted. Union Grove messengers were extend- 
ed the right hand of fellowship welcoming them into the Association. 

29. At this time a Mission was asked for in East Lexington. This 
is to be left to the Promotion Executive Committee. 

30. Benediction by Rev. V. L. Andrews. 

The meeting was adjourned to meet Wednesday, 9:45 a. m, 
N. C. Teague, Moderator. A. L. Snider, Clerk 



SECOND DAY Wednesday Morning 

31. Carey Davis was in charge of the Devotional Song Service. The 
song used was "Come Thou Fount." Rev. E. C. Roach conducted the 
morning devotion, reading some verfves from Phil. 4, useing as his sub- 
ject, "The Need of Christ." Rev. D. S. Brinkley, a retired minister, 
led in prayer. 



Liberty Baptist Association 



21 



32, Christian Education. This report was prepared and given by 
J. C. Reed of Lick Creek Church. 

Christian Education 

No one will deny that the Christian colleges operated by our Baptist 
convention have rendered a great service in training young men and women 
for Christian leadership, not only as ministers and teachers but Christian 
leaders in every walk of life. The opportunity for still greater service is 
open to these colleges and to be able to render this service, they must con- 
tinue to have the loyal support of our Baptist people. 

One of the needs of all these colleges is more buildings. At the out- 
break of the war, most construction work was stopped due to restrictions 
on materials. A college must have something other than buildings. It must 
have an operating fund. The cost of operating a college has advanced much 
during the past few years. One of the aims of our Christian colleges is to 
hold the cost within the reach of the average student. A Christian college 
should also offer a high standard of academic work. Most students prefer a 
college that is recognized for its excellency of work and our Baptist colleges 
are anxious to offer work equal to other colleges. Many faculty members who 
have been in the armed forces have returned this year, and their presence 
will add strength to the colleges. The Baptist churches throughout N. C. 
fcy their generous contributions to the co<-operative program have greatly in- 
creased the operating funds of our colleges. The colleges will receive around 
$300,000.00 this year from this source. The Baptists of N. C. have a won- 
derful opportunity in contributing to this program, and by doing so they 
help maintain a high standard of Christian work in our colleges 

This year more students want to enroll in our Christian colleges than 
in any previous year and our colleges would like to care for every worthy 
student but hundreds will be turned away because of the lack of facilities 
for taking care of them. Our Baptist people are coming to realize more and 
more the apportunities they have in making Christian education possible. 

The enrollment in the various colleges for the year 1946-47 will be 
about as follows: Wake Forest, 1400; Meridith, 600; Mars Hill, 900; Camp- 
bell, 500; Wingate, 300. These figures will be much increased when ma- 
terials and labor become available and the college plants enlarged. In some 
instances the money is already available to start work. 

Crowded conditions also exist in all our seminaries. During the past 
year, the enrollment was the largest in history. If these Baptist institu- 
tion are to continue to grow and meet all demands, additional facilities must 
be provided for. Many of our colleges and seminaries are now in the midst 
of a campaign to raise funds to meet these needs. 

There is a feeling on the part of some that the spiritual side of educa- 
tion is somewhat neglected in our secular schools. President Hutchins of 
the University of Chicago says materialism has captured our education. 
Ex-Preaident Coolidge once said that "a trained intelligence can do much, 
but there is no substitute for morality, character, and religious convictions." 
By supporting our Baptist schools, we may feel sure that we are support- 
ing an education that cares for the spiritual and moral side as well as the 
academic. Respectfully submitted, 

J. C. Reed 

This report was adopted. It was discussed by Marc H. Lovelace 
of Wake Forest, Pro. Kendall of Mars Hill, J. E. Miller of Meredith 
Colleges and Claud Gaddy of Raleigh. 



Minutes of the 



33. Report of Committee to Name Persons 

to Bring Reports Next Year 

Christian Literature . Rev. L. J. Matthews 

Baptist Hospital Rev. J. W. Dickens 

State Missions F. B. Laws 

Home Missions Mrs. G. C. Lewis 

Foreign Missions Rev. E. C. Roach 

Christian Education Carroll Wall 

Relief and Annuity W. H. Lomax 

Orphanage . Rev. C. C. Eddinger 

Musio W. B. Lord 

Public Morals Rev. C. S. Young 

American Bible Society Rev. T. B. Flowe 

Sunday School . ._ Rev. E. F. Baker 

Training Union J. B. Powell 

W. M. U Mrs. N. C. Teague 

State of Churches __Rev. V. W. Sears 

34. L. L. Carpenter, editor of the Biblical Recorder, spoke on 
Christian Literature. 

35. The congregation united in singing "Keep Me Near the Cross." 

Election of Officers 

36. The committee to nominate officers for 1947 made their report 
at this time, also the following recommendations to the Association 

Moderator Rev. N. C. Teague 

V. Moderator. __Rev. B. A. Mitchell 
Clerk-Treasurer A. L. Snider 



Asso. S. S. Supt.Rev. B. A. Mitchell 
Asso. B.T.U. Dir._Miss Eliza. Crow 



Song Leader Carey Davis 

Pianist Mrs. Austin Sink 

Orphanage Representative _C. C. Wall 
Chm. Pro. Ex. Com._Rev. E. F. Baker 
Recorder Rep 'sent' _Rev. J. A. Neilson 
Executive Committee— N. C. Teague, A. L. Snider, E. F. Baker, J. R. 
Clifford, C. V. Teague, Chas. F. Leek, C. C. Eddinger. 
Recommendations: 1st — That the promotion-executive committee be 
empowered by the Association to fill the offices of Asso. Sunday School 
Supt. and Asso. B. T. U. Director for the year 1946-47. 

2nd — That henceforth the Asso.B. T. U. and Sunday School bring rec- 
ommendations to the regular meeting of the Association for an Asso. Sun- 
day School Supt. and an Associational B. T. U. Director. 
37. Report of Finance Committee 

1. Your committee wishes to praise the Clerk for the splendid manner 
in which he handled the fin an cs of the Association for the past year. 

2. Financial report — (See page 13, item 12, for Treasurer's Report) 

3. Recommendations: (1) After examination of financial reports from 
the churches we find that there were 9 churches which failed to send in 40 
per member the balance of their apportionment would amount to $34.22, 
we recommend that these churches see that this balance reach our Clerk- 
Treasurer within 30 days. 

(2) That due to the increased expenses in printing, etc. that the churches 
send not less than 5^f pea* member in 1947 so there will be no need for 
special offerings only in case of an emergency. 

(3) In reference to the letter from the High Rock Mission asking for an 
offering to be used in completing their church building, we feel that the 
Association in its Annual Session should not be asked for such an offering 
as it might discourage attendance at these meetingr, but we recommend 
that this be refered to the local churches. 

Respectfully submitted, 
C. B. Atkinson, E. F. Baker, 
W. H. Lomax, L. E. Lookabill, Paul Lovingood 



Liberty Baptist Association 



23 



38 The Moderator at this time recognized the Vice Moderator who 
made the report regarding the Associational Missionary. 

Report of Promotion Executive Committee 

In view of pressing needs for an Associational Missionary our Liberty 
Pastors' Conference named a committee of which Bro. C. B. Atkinson, of 
Erlanger, was chairman to study these needs, the cost, help from our State 
General Board, and contact our churches as to definate subscriptions. 
This committee worked diligently. They found that $3,800 to $4,000 per 
year (all things included) would be necessary; that $750 to $900 could be 
expected from the General Board; and that 17 churches had made subscrip- 
tions (a few tentatively) which amounted to $2,310. 

At the request of this committee of pastors, a meeting of the Promo- 
tion Executive Committee was held in Lexington August 27. This was well 
attended and representative. After hearing the report of facts as recorded 
above — also full discussion about a missionary — the following action was 
unanimously taken, "That the Liberty Association employ a missionary as 
soon as it is financially feasible and that we ask all the churches which 
have made subscriptions to increase their pledges (by ]/3 if possible) and 
that all churches be asked to make pledges or contributions, reporting to the 
moderator as soon as action is taken, not later than the meeting at Denton, 
Sept. 24 & 25." This action and request were forwarded to all pastors and 
S. S. Superintendents of our Association at once. 

As of today, Sept. 25, 1946, we have had responses from 23 of our 31 
churches. Of the 8 not responding 2 are without pastors; 2 are not repre- 
sented at this meeting; we do not know about the other 4 churches. The 
total subscribed now is $3,075. A few are tentative, but only a few. We 
have $3,075 fairly definitely in sight for a missionary. 

Respectfully submitted, 

N. C. Teague, Chm. 

A motion to table the report until afternoon was adopted. 

Co-operative Program 

39. The report on State Missions was prepared and given by Rev. 
J. F. Jarrett, teacher at Junior O. U. A. M. Home. 

STATE MISSIONS IN N. C, 1946 
State Missions continues to provide a varied and rich program. Recent 
efforts have been made to provide Associational Missionaries and to provide 
for sending into the churches young people from our colleges during the 
summer. Certain activities which have been carried on for the Kingdom 
work in North Carolina are listed as follows: 

1. Aid is provided for part payment of Missionary Pastors in needy 
places. During the year ending Sept. 1945, we had 66 pastors that were 
being aided. These pastors were serving 107 churches, in which they preach- 
ed 5,868 sermons, made 19,991 visits, conducted 150 revivals, and reported 
1,084 baptisms. Apart from the amount which these churches paid on pas- 
tor's salaries and church buildings, namely $113,050.00, they gave to our 
Convention causes $34,340.00. 

2. The State Mission Program provides for three general missionaries: 
J. C. Pipes, who works in the western part of the state on a part time basis. 
E. L. Spivey, who works out of Charlotte, and E. L. Bradley, who workB 
in the eastern part of the state. These men assist the Secretary in all work 
of the Convention. 



Minutes of the 



3. The State Board continues to have calls for help on church buildings. 
At least $100,000.00 a year is needed in this work. If the Board had such 
an amount, it is believed it could be used to stimulate the raising of up to 
$200,000.00 by the churches them selves. 

4. The Convention also promotes work among the Indians in Roberson 
County. The 26 churches in the Burnt Swamp Association reported 238 
baptisms. Our Board also assists the Negro Baptists in helping to pay the 
salaries of three leading workers of the General Convention, namely, the 
Executive Secretary, the Director of Religious Education and the Training 
Union Secretary. This will mean much in bringing about unity of the 
Baptist forces in North Carolina. 

5. The Convention continues to assist in ministering to the spiritual wel- 
fare of the sick in the Veterans Hospital at Oteen. It also makes possible for 
the gospel to be carried the Tubercular patients at the Sanitorium at Black 
Mountain and the N. C. Sanitorium near Aberdeen. E. M. Harris who 
ministers to the patients of the N. C. Sanitorium also ministers to the 
girls at Samarcand. 

6. As to the Associational Missionaries, we now have about 35. The Con- 
vention through State Missions, provides around $750.00 per year toward 
the salary and expenses and the association provides the rest. 

7. The State Mission program also promotes Christian Education in 
churches. This consists of the S. S., B. T. U. and Student Union Divisions. 

8. Another important work that is being carried on by the State Mission 
Board, is that of sending our college students to work in the churches dur- 
ing the summer. This year we had around 75 young people to work in the 
individual churches and associations. It is estimated that they will have 
touched not less than 600 to 800 churches during the summer. It is diffi- 
cult to tabulate even tangible results, but often the intangible results, that 
do not show up for a long time, are more valuable. 

9. Other items that come under State Missions are the Allied Church 
League, North Carolina Radio Hour, and Pastors' Schools and Conferences. 
At the begining of the year 1946, a six weeks' Seminary Course for pastors 
was held at Boone, N. C, in which 72 pastors enrolled. 

To make it possible for this work to be carried on, the State Mission 
Board received inl945 11% of the Undesignated Funds plus the Special 
Designations for State Missions. The total amount received for this pur- 
pose from these two sourses was $219,741.08, a gain over 1944 of $36,878.86. 
It is hoped that there will be even a greater increase for this year. 
Respectfully submitted, 

John F. Jarratt 

This report was adopted. 
39 A. Home Missions. This report vsas prepared and made by Mrs. 
R. S. Green, of First Church, Thomasville. 

REPORT on HOME MISSIONS 

We have heard much in recent years about the "Good Neighbor Policy", 
and also, because of rapid transportation and communication, that the 
world has become "One World." 

We cannot isolate our selves from others tccjay and it is a time when 
we should put into practice the commandment of our Lord, "Thou shalt 
love thy neighbor as thy self." 

One of our returned missionaries has said that all missions are one to- 
day, since we live in one world and that there should be no distinction be- 



Liberty Baptist Association 



25 



tween Home and Foreign Missions. 

Jesus said to his disciples "Ye shall be witnesses unto me both in Jeru- 
salem and in all Judea, and in Samaria and unto the uttermost part of the 
earth." In harmony with our Southern Baptist program, my interpreta- 
tion of this is that we are to be witnesses in our home town or the com- 
munity about our local church, as our Jerusalem; in our own state as our 
Judea; in our Southern Baptist Convention territory as our Samaria; and 
unto the uttermost part as our foreign mission work. 

In seeking to evaluate the work of the Home Mission Board thru the 
years it is necessary to go back and trace the growth since the time it was 
set up at the organization of the Southern Baptist Convention in 1845. 
A study of this will show a steady growth and expansion — a reaohing out 
to give the gospel to more and more people as means have been provided. 

Secretary J. B. Lawrence reported at a recent meeting that the first 
quarter of this year showed an increase of 14.2% over the same period last 
year. Cooperative program receipts were up 40%, while designations and 
trust fund receipts were off. There were 851 Home Board workers who ser- 
ved ji 1945 — more than 16,000 conversions were reported, 471 new missions 
opened and 123 new churches organized. Work is being done among Mex- 
icans, Indians, Italians, French, Chinese and Negroes. Cuba is an impor- 
tant field, and in Panama, Costa Rica and the Canal Zone are workers 
under the Home Mission Board. 

There is work also among the deaf. City Missions has been carried on 
for 100 years and is a growing work in Home Missions. Under this many 
good will centers have been 6et up and have reached helping hands to 
mothers and children, enlisting and winning many to Christ. Rural evangel- 
ism, camp work, schools of missions, missionary and visual education are 
all included in the work of this important Board. 

Last spring Rev. Jacob Gartenhaus rounded out 25 years of service 
under our Home Board, to his own people — the Jews — truly a labor of love. 
It would be hard to reckon the value of his work. For a while he was our 
lone representative to a great multitude in widely scattered areas, but he 
spared not himself in his efforts to win his people. He has organized groups 
in many churches called "Friends of Israel," and thru them and thru the 
the little magazine, "The Mediator," he has sought to convince the Jews 
that Jesus is the promised Messiah. Today he has others helping him. 

Recently a number of new missionaries have been appointed, some to 
serve the Mexicans and some to minister to the Indians. 

The Womans Missionary Union has provided $18,000.00 for construc- 
tion of a mission building and pastor's home at Cherokee, N. C. Another 
mission building is to be erected on the Cherokee Reservation in N. C. Also 
there is to be a Sunday school annex provided at Jeannette, La. 

A church extention revolving loan fund of $100,000.00 was set aside in 
1944 and the next year $200,000.00 additional making a fund of $300,000.00 
which is being used for the building of new churches in strategic situations 
and already loans have been made to churches in several states, which 
have used most of this fund. 

Dr. Alfred Carpenter, who served as Superintendent of Baptist Chap- 
lains during World War II both in the states and abroad, has been added 
to the staff of the Home Mission Board as Superintendent of Direct Mis- 
sions. This includes all language groups, mission centers, work in western 
states, Cuba and Panama, which work was formerly supervised by 



26 



Minutes of the 



Dr. J. W. Beagle who served so faithfully and well, and was then taken over 
by Dr. Courts Redford in addition to his work as Assistant Secretary of 
the Board. Dr. Carpenter is admirably fitted for this work, having form- 
erly served as Superintendent of Missions in Panama and as Field Represen- 
tative in the States. 

Mr. William E. Young, late of Memphis, Tenn., has been elected 
Assistant to the Secretary of Evangelism. Provision has been made for 
employment of a Baptist Student Union Secretary to promote this work 
among students at Negro colleges. This is an outgrowth of the coopera- 
tive work of the Home Board in Negro colleges, and the success of the 
movement has proved an inspiration and will be of definate assistance to 
these Negro students. 

The little magazine "Southern Baptist Home Missions," only 25^ per 
year, will keep any one informed concerning the well rounded program 
launched by our Home Mission Board which is reaching out the helping 
hand to the foreigner in our midst, to the Jew, to the neglected and unen- 
listed, to the underprivileged, to the needy churches, to the Indian, to the 
Negro, to the "down and out ones"— in fact there are none so lowly and 
none so high but that the Way of Life can be make plain to them thru 
some agency of the Home Mission Board. 

"And I, if I be lifted up from the earth, will draw all men unto me." . 
Respectfully submitted, 

Mrs. R. S. Green 

This report was adopted. 

39 B. Foreign Missions. This report was prepared and made by 
R. D. Covington, Treasurer of Mill Home. 

REPORT on FOREIGN MISSIONS 

During the first 100 years of its existence, the Foreign Mission Board 
of the Southern Baptist Convention appointed 1347 missionaries to foreign 
fields, including 44 appointed at its April meeting this year. These mission- 
aries have wrought in 20 nations. At the close of the century five and a half 
million Baptists were represented by five and a half hundred missionaries. 

As we enter the second century we face open doors and many adver- 
saries. Some of the favorable conditions are accelerated transportation; a 
more compact world; a more intimate acquaintance with the whole world; 
the appeal from various nations for preachers, teachers, medical mission- 
aries, and others who can help rebuild wrecked countries; growing literacy; 
opportunities for giving relief; and the failure of human philosophies and 
religions. 

Some of the adversaries are our own indifference, Roman Catholicism, 
Communism, Mohammedanism, inconsistant living of professed Christians 
in this and other lands, racial and religious tensions, national and inter- 
national conflicts. 

As we return to war stricken lands we enter open doors with courage 
and confidence in the power of the gospel to triumpth over all adversaries. 
We still believe that the name of Christ is the only name given under hea- 
ven among men whereby we must be saved. Our message for the whole 
world is Redemption, Repentance, Regeneration, and Resurrection power 
in living and serving. This gospel is not only to be proclaimed everywhere, 
but it is to be confirmed by godly lives and compassionate hearts. The only 
way to meet the futile and fatuous faiths of a sinning, suffering world is 



Liberty Baptist Association 



27 



not by compromising and diluting the Word committed to us, but by 
preaching, teaohing, and exemplifying the gospel of our holy and loving 
God. Open doors constitute our obligation to obey the command of our 
Savior and Lord and, as speedily as possible, make disciples of all nations, 
baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy 
Spirit, and teaching them to observe all things whatsoever the Lord has 
commanded us. 

We have a three-fold task, Relief, Reconstruction, and Reinforcement. 
Our most urgent task is that of ministering in the name of Jesus to needy 
millions around the world. Multitudes of people are starving and next 
year will be too late to save them. It is estimated that half of the world, 
or more than a billion people lack sufficient food. We must answer to 
Christ at the Judgement for our failure to feed the hungry, clothe the 
naked, shelter the homeless, minister to the sick, visit those in prison. 
The Southrn Baptist Convention in its recent meeting in Miami launched 
a program for $3,500,000 for relief and reconstruction. The response just- 
ifies the belief that this amount and more will be provided this year. 

In war devastated areas there is a tremendous job of rehabilitation, 
providing buildings and equipment for churches, school, hospitals, mission- 
ary homes. We must in every land reinforce our missionary program. 
Instead of 560 we should have 1,000 missionaries on the field within the 
next twelve months. Men and money are greatly needed for this urgent 
task. The Foreign Mission Board joins heartily in the decision of the 
Miami Convention to fortify and enlarge the Cooperative Program. 

We are face to face as never before with the choice — one world or none. 
Life and death have been set before us. The choice is ours between the 
annihilating power of the atomic bomb or the redemptive power of the 
Cross of Christ. Which shall it be? 

Respectfully submitted, 

R. D. Covington 

This report was adopted. 

40. Following these reports M. A. Huggin3, General state secretary, 
brought a message discussing the Co-operative program. 

41. The Association reo&ssed for dinner, to meet back at 1:30p.m. 

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON 

42. The Association was called to order at 1:30 p. m. by the Moder- 
ator, Rev. N. C. Teague. 

43. "Stand up, Stand up for Jesus'* was sung at this time. 

44. The devotion was led by Rev. Paul Lovingood, physical director 
at Mills Home. His subjeot was, "Why am I a Christian?" 

45. The American Bible Society. This report was prepared and 
presented by Rev. C. V. Talbert, pastor of Smith Grove. 

American Bible Society 

Ivan L. Bennett, Chief U. S. Army Chaplain in Japan, recently sent 
the American Bible Society five money orders totalling $426.00 with a let- 
ter reading: 

"I think you and some of the other people in America will be inter- 
ested to know that Chaplain N. A. Lanning, one of the Chaplians on duty 
here in Tokyo, mentioned the gift of Scriptures the Bible Society is mak- 
ing for the people of Japan in a Sunday morning service and told the 



28 



Minutes of the 



soldiers who might desire to have a part in this effort might leave their 
offering in a plate at the entrance of the Chapel. The contributions being 
in yen and amounting to more than 6,000, made a full plate. 

"It strikes me that this gift may have some meaning beyond the value 
of the money at the bank, as it may reveal to other pecple how the sol- 
diers who bore the burden of battle feel about the task ahead." 

Pvt. Park K. Sowash wrote from Germany, "Enclosed are two U. S. 
Postal Orders for $200.00. This money was given by the soldiers and civ- 
ilians in the Frankfurt area to print New Testaments in Germany. The 
German people are wanting these Testaments very much." Scores of sim- 
ilar letters have been received from almost every part of the world, with 
gifts totaling thousands of dollars. 

These men are aware of a single, simple fact; tragic and bewildered 
people all over the world are turning to the Bible and they will not have 
ib unless we give it to them. 

Startling, challenging, and imperative are the emergency needs which 
face the American Bible Society in the post-war period: 

For Japan— 2,500,000 New Testaments in Japanese, 100,000 

Bibles in Japanese, 100,000 New Testaments in English. 
For China— 300,000 Bibles, 1,000,000 New Testaments, 

10,000,000 Gospels: 
For Germany— 900,000 Bibles, 2,800,000 New Testaments, 
2,800,000 Gospels. 

And for the rest of Europe and the Philippines and Korea and other 
areas in the Pacific, additional large orders running into hundreds of thous- 
ands of volumes also have to be met. These are all emergency needs grow- 
ing out of conditions created by the war. The regular work of the Society 
calling for millions of volumes annually must be carried on as well. The 
normal prooesees of Bible distribution have been continued along with the 
emergency requirements. 

For 130 years the American Bible Society has been the official agency 
of the churches for the translation, publication and distribution of the 
Word of God. There is no overlaping or confusion. Each December 
officially appointed representatives of some forty denominations meet with 
the Society to hear its reports and survey its budget for the coming year. 

During 1945 the American Bible Society:— distributed 12,243,353 vol- 
umes of the Scriptures, tiie past ten year average being 8,251,197; reached 
a total of 458,060 Bibles, 4,472,522 Testaments; and 2,560,284 Gospels and 
other Portion, supplied freely to Chaplains and service men and women 
during the war period; shipped for German prisoners of war in the United 
States and abroad 32,512 Bibles, 475,696 Testaments, and 983,426 Gospels; 
toward the desperate need of civilians, pastors and people in liberated areas 
in Europe and Asia sent 18,040 Bibles, 305,775 Testaments, and 1,359,117 
Gospels; shipped 250,000 Gospels in four native Philippine languages for 
distribution before Christmas to liberated Filipinos; received and prepared 
to meet a challenging call for 100,000 Bibles and 2,500,000 Testaments for 
Japan and an even greater estimate of need in Europe; promoted World- 
wide Bible Reading as a successor to Nation-wide Bible Reading, Thanks- 
giving to Christmas, distributing approximately 20,000,000 reading lists in 
15 different countries as widely seperated as China, Egypt and Columbia. 

The theme for 1946 is "The Word of Power for a Power Age." Obser- 
vance should go beyond any previous year and tens-of-thousands of church- 
es throughout the world will observe Dec. 8 as Universal Bible Sunday. 



Liberty Baptist Association 



29 



The men who sent their gift thru Chaplain Bennett, Pvt. Sowash and 
his friends are expecting us to join them in giving the Scriptures. Despite 
all it did last year, the American Bible Society faces opportunities so far in 
excess of any other offered before, that gifts for 1946 should double those 
of 1945, and even then many who are crying out for the Word of God will 
not be supplied. 

During the year 1945 a total of $44,952 was received from 25,965 
churches of the Southern Baptist Convention. 

The following resolutions are, therefore proposed: That the Liberty 
Baptist Association commend the American Bible Society for its accomp- 
lishments in supplying the armed forces during the war with more than 
7 million Bibles, New Testaments, Gospels and other Portions; also for its 
vision and skill in preparing Scriptures in many languages for the civilians 
in devastated areas, and delivery of same at close of hostilities; also that 
we commend the Society for carrying on its normal work in this country 
and abroad to a greater extent than ever before; That it urge each each 
church to give generously to the Society for both its regular budget and its 
world rehabilitation program; That each church be requested to set aside 
Sunday, December 8, 1946, or some other suitable day, on which the place 
of the Bible is really emphasized, and the church's responsibiliey for Bible 
distribution be laid upon the conscience of the people; That the churches 
encourage its members to join in the daily reading of the Bible between 
Thanksgiving and Christmas, selections this year are under the general 
theme "The Word of Power for a Power Age" as made available in suit- 
able form, free of charge, by the American Bible Society. 

Respectfully submitted, 
C. V. Talbert 

This report was adopted. 

46. Report on Music. This report was prepared and presented by 
Bro. Carey Davis of Abbotts Creek Church. 

Report on Music 

Music has been, and continues to be, of the greatest possible service in 
developing the religious nature, and in bringing us to an experience with 
God, and fellowship with Jesus Christ. Great care, as well as prayer should 
be taken before choosing our music for the worship service. The problem 
of leadership in church music is a serions one. Many choir directors, 
pianists and singers are badly in need of training, but most of all we need 
to be consecrated christian men and women with the ability and training 
in music to lead our church in a musical program. When the associatons are 
fully awakened to the need of better churoh music, it will have leaders in 
the field doing for the music of our churches, the same work that it is do- 
ing for our Sunday Schools and Training Unions. 

We have three kinds of musio in our church worship that is acceptable: 
The Anthem; The Gospel Song; The Standard Hymn. 

The Anthem is sung by the choir and is usually taken from the Bible. 

The Gospel Song is a sacred folk song free in form, emotional in charac- 
ter, evangelistic in purpose and spirit. 

The Standard Hymn, as a rule is more Scriptural, more stately and 
devotional in character, more refined in poetic language, more 
worshipful in purpose and spirit. 

Letters were mailed to the pastors, representing 31 churches concern- 
ing church music; of these 19 have answered, from which we have received 



30 



Minutes of the 



the following information: 

11 Churches have Choir Practice regularly. 
9 Churches use the Broadman Hymnal. 
5 Churches use Songs of Faith. 
2 Churches use the Modern Hymnal. 
1 Church uses the Baptist Hymnal. 
1 Church uses the American Hymnal. 
1 Church uses the Service Hymnal 
In these 19 churches, we have a total of 374 Choir members. 

Musac holds a fresh significance in solving the problems of the youth 
of today; there is need for a greater understanding of music in education, 
and a deeper determination that all church people shall have the benefit of 
this rich heritage of music. Indeed there is a big job ahead, but may we 
continue to find the joyous fellowship, and the spiritual uplift that will aid 
us through our musical program in the coming years. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Carey J. Davis 

This report was adopted. 

47. State of the Churches. This report was prepared and presented 
by Rev. B. A. Mitchell, pastor of Abbotts Creek andWallburg Churches. 

State of the Churches 

The reports sent in by the churches this year indicate the most suc- 
cessful year of our Baptist work in the Liberty Association. Incomplete 
data will prevent our giving an accurate report, but we can give one that 
will acquaint you with the trend of the work. 

1. As to membership, a net gain of 75 members was reported, the mem- 
bership now standing at 7871. There were 347 baptisms reported. That is 
175 less than was reported last year. 13 churches reported no baptisms. 
19 churches reported a net gain. 8 reported losses, and 4 showed neither 
gain nor loss. 

2. The Sunday School: An enrollment of 7174 is reported, an increase 
of 789. Average attendance totaled 4031, a rise of 139 above last year. 

3. Baptist Training Union: 80 units, with an enrollment of 1,130, a 
slight gain over last year. 

4. W. M. U.: 113 organizations as over against 99 last year, giving an 
increase of 14 organizations. 

Gifts: (1) For local causes $141,348.64, gain of $3,968.61 

(2) For Missions 44,121.42,. gain of 2,066.31 

(3) For Orphanage 10,020.66, gain of 1,120.65 

(4) TOTAL GIFTS $185,448.06, gain of $5,903.98 

In the financial field, we have made a gain in every cause, though the 
gains for some of these are small. No loss has been noted. 

Some of the churches are negligent of Associational expenses. Only 18 
churches reach the 4^ per member asked of the churches. 14 churches sent 
in much less than that amount, and 1 church sends none at all. 

We urge a continuation of our financial gains; and a renewed effort in 
evangelism in that we have made losses in this field. 

Respectfully submitted, 
B. A. Mitchell 

This report was adopted. 



Liberty Baptist Association 



31 



Report of Committees 

48. Committee report on Time, Place, and Preacher. 

Your Committee on Time, Place, and Preacher recommends as follows: 

TIME— Tuesday and Wednesday after 4 th Sunday in September 1947. 
PLACE— Wallburg Baptist Church, Wallburg. 
PREACHER— E. F. Baker, Pastor New Friendship Church. 
ALTERNATE— Chas. F. Leek, Pastor 1st Church, Thomasville. 

Victor L. Andrews, Chm. 
This report was adopted. 

49. Committee report on RESOLUTIONS. 

We, of the Liberty Baptist Association wish to extend to the Denton 
Baptist Church deep gratitude for the fine hospitality displayed in the 
cordial welcome extended and the abundant and delicious meals, thanks to 
its able pastor and noble women of the church. We also express our appre- 
ciation to the Moderator and Clerk of the Association for the efficient man- 
ner in which they planned and carried on the work of this Association. 
Respectfully submitted, 

C. C. Eddinger, Chm. 
This report was adopted by a standing vote. 

50. Associational Missionary 

This report was carried over from the morning session, as to the em- 
ployment of an Associational Missionary. At this time Rev. E. F. Baker, 
pastor of New Friendship Church, made a motion to employ an Associa- 
tional Missionary. This motion was seconded by Rev. J. W. Dickens, 
pastor of Center Hill Church. In this motion it was stated that the Asso- 
ciational Executive Committee was to select the missionary. 

The Association voted to adopt this report and secure the missionary. 

51. Committee report on OBITUARIES. 

(See page 32 for list of members who have died during the year) 

52. Special music was rendered by a quartet: Carey Davis and D. S. 
Hayworth, of Abbotts Creek Church; Rev. B. A. Mitchell, pastor of 
Abbotts Creek and Wallburg Churches, and Rev. E. C. Roach, pastor 
of Denton Church. 

53. Closing Message 

This message was brought by Dr. J. Clyde Turner, pastor of the 
First Baptist Church, Greensboro, His subject was, "Baptists and 
Missions." This was a soul stiring message to all Christians present. 

54. The Association adjourned to meet with the Wallburg Baptist 
Church, at Wallburg, on Tuesday and Wednesday after the fourth 
Sunday in September, 1947. 

55. Benediction by Rev. Charles F. Leek, pastor of First Baptist 
Church, Thomasville. 



A. L. Snider, Clerk 
Box 96, 
Denton, N. C. 



Rev. N. C. Teague, Moderator 
Route 3, 
Lexington, N. C. 



32 



Minutes of the 



GDur Mom? (&im& 

Who have answered The Roll Call since Our Last Session 

"In my Father's House are Many Mansions, 
I go to prepare a Place for You." John 14:2 

Abbotts Creek— Mt. C. N. Brown, Miss Elsie Orrell, Mr. C. E. 

Spurgeon, Mr. C. H. Teague. 
Carolina Avenue — None. 
Center Hill— None 

Churchland— Mr. C. H. Barnes, Mr. B. R. Berrier, Mrs. H. Clay 

Grubb, Mrs. Sally Lanning, Mrs. A. 0. Grubb. 
Denton — Miss Nell Plummer. 
Erlanger — Mrs. E. M. Hughes. 
Floyd— None. 

Holloway— Mrs. Dolly Palmer, Mrs. Alice Hedrick, Mrs. Sally 

Ann Cross, Mr. Frank Tysinger, Lt. Ray C. Rook. 
High Rock Mission — None. 

Jersey— Mr. W. L. Smith, Mr. Irvin Smith (killed in service)t 

Mr. William Barbee: 
Lexington — James D. Redwine (Deacon), Mr. S. L. Potts, Mr. 

Norman Corn (of Navy), 
Liberty — Miss Hope Helpler. 
Lick Creek — Mrs. Sirona Surratt. 

Mills Home— Mrs. R. D. Covington, Lt. E. Morris Eggers. 
Mountain View — None. 

New Friendship — Mr. A. D. Dease, Mrs. Minnie Sink. 
Oak Hill— Mrs.Clifford R. Hill. 
Pleasant Plains — None 

Reeds— Mr. C. E. Shoaf, Mrs. L. C. Snyder, Mrs. Lorenza Craver, 

Mrs. J. G. Sink. 
Reid Street— Mr. L. J. Pressley 

Rich For k— Mrs. Lillie Sink, Mr. E. K. Myers, Mrs. Frances 

Bradham, Mr. Odell V. Hedrick, Mrs. Ada Lee Darr. 
Sheets Memorial — Mr. Isaac Yarbrough, Mrs. W. E. Dalton. 
Smith Grove — None. 

Southside — Mr. J. M. Roberts, Mrs. Bessie Eanes, Mrs. Naeada 
Long. 

Stoners Grove— Mr. Walter Stoner. 

Summerville — Mrs. Sarah Graig, Mrs. Sally Bean, Mr. Kern Buie. 

Mr. J. A. Gallimore, Mr. J. M. Henderson. 
Taylors Grove— Rev. C. B. Reid (Pastor). 

Thomasville— Mr. L. W. Stone, Mr. B. L. West, Mrs. Paul Craven, 

Mrs. J. W. Huffman, Mrs. L. A. Burton. 
Wallburg— None. 
Walters Grove — None. 

Welcome— Mrs. L. C. Love, Mr. M. L. Craver, Mr. W. L. Hoover. 
West End Mission — None. 

E. C. Roach, R. D. Covington, 
J. W. Byars, T. W. McGee, W. H. Conner 



Liberty Baptist Association 



88 



MINUTES of WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 
Liberty Baptist Association 

In Celebration of the 40th Annual Session of the W. M. U. of the 
Liberty Association, a meeting was held in the Rioh Fork Baptist Church 
on April 10, 1946 with 15 churchs and 24 Societies represented. The meet- 
ing was called to order by the Superintendent, Mrs. N. C. Teague. The 
Theme for the day's program, "We've a Story to Tell to tiie Nation" was 
portrayed in the first hymn sung. The Watchword, "Laborers together 
with God," 1 Cor. 3:9; "Look unto me and be ye saved all ye ends of the 
earth, for I am God and there is none else." Is. 45:22; "For ye serve the 
Lord Christ." 1 Cor. 3:24 were repeated in unison by the congregation. 
The Seasons of Prayer: For God's guidance during the day, Miss Roxie 
Sheets; For those on the prayer Calender, Mrs. E. F. Baker; For "The 
Whole Wide World," Mrs. A. C. McCormick were observed. 

Greetings were brought to the visitors by Mrs. V. W. Sears of the Rich 
Fork Church, and Mrs. S. O. Hinkle of New Friendship Church responded. 
The following visitors were recognized: Rev. A. R. Gallimore, Missionary 
to China; Mrs. R. K. Redwine, State Worker. Pastors: Rev. N. C. Teague, 
C. C. Eddinger, J. W. Dickens and C. V. Talbert. 

Mrs. N. C. Teague with her theme, "Laborers in a World-wide Task" 
submitted the following report as Superintendent: During the year 1945 
our Liberty W. M. U. has gone forward, not in a spetacular way, but with 
a steady increase of most all phases of the work. 

SPECIAL MEETINGS: January 26— Leadership Conference 

March 1 — Executive Committee Meeting 
July 27— Camp Rally at Rich Fork. 

HONOR ROLL 

W. M. S. Y. W. A. G. A. R. A. S. B. 

Erlanger Erlanger Int. Lex. 1st Lex. 1st Lex. 1st 

Lex. 1st Lex. 1st Jr. Lex. 1st Int. New Fr. New Fr. 

New Fr. New Fr. Int., New Fr. Jr., New Fr. Jersey 

Mills Hm. Page, Mills Hm. Jr., Reeds 

T'mosv'le Int., T'mosv'le 

Jr., New Fr. 

FULLY GRADED UNIONS: Abbotts Creek, Erlanger, Holloways, 
Lexington 1st, Mills Home, New Friendship, Reid Street, Thomasville 1st. 

SPECIAL MENTION 

Lexington 1st, A-l Fully Graded Unions 
New Friendship, A-l Fully Graded Union for the 12th year 
Mills Home and New Friendship receive a Missionary gift from 
every resident church member. 

FINANCIAL REPORT for the YEAR 1945 

Women Young People Total 

1st Quarter $ 2,204.50 $ 665.91 $ 2,770.11 

2nd Quarter 2,203.50 576.18 2,779.68 

3rd Quarter 3,348.98 591.60 4,040.58 

4th Quarter 3,616.19 763.63 4,379.82 

Year's Totals $11,472.87 $2,497.32 $13,970.19 

Comparative figures for the past two years: 

1944. —$ 9,384.78 $2,670.91 $12,055.69 

1945. $11,472.87 $2,497.32 $13,970.19 



Minutes of the 



We reached all points in the Standard of Excellence Chart with the 
exception of number 5; As an Association we did not reach the 20% Cen- 
tennial Goal though our financial increase was more than 15%. We rejoice 
that some of our organisations did make the worthy centennial goal. 

SOME WORTHY AIMS FOR 1946 

1. More organizations begun. (We need 11 new ones to make the goal.) 

2. More consecrated leaders for Young People's Organizations. 

3. A greater realization that there are multitudes yet without Christ. 

Let us pray that the Lord of the harvest will send forth laborers into 
His harvest; 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mrs. N. C. Teague 
The report was unaimously ad oped. 

REPORT of Mrs. C. B. Atkinson, Mission Study Chm. 
1 Mission Study Institute Total Seals 761 

13 Schools of Missions Official Seals 6 

Total number Mission Study Classes 142 Honor Certificates 5 

Total number in classes 1293 Centinuation Certificates 3 

Reading Stamps 146 
REPORT on COMMUNITY MISSIONS 
As summed up in Poem by Mrs. Reid Smith 

"I'd rather see a sermon Than to hear one any day; 
I'd rather one would walk with me Than merely tell the way. 
The best of all the preachers Are the men who live their creed, 
For to see good put in action Is what every body needs. 

Mrs. P. M. Hendricks, Stewardship Chairman, stressed the importance 
of the giving of our time and talents as well as our means. 

Mrs. J. A. Shookey, Literature Chairman, made an interesting and 
lively appeal for subscriptions to the different magazines and peroidicals. 

Mrs. R. K. Redwine, State Represenative, brought an inspiring mes- 
sage on the subject, "The Urgency of Making Him Known." 

Rev. A. R. Gallimore's message, "The World for Christ", was most 
challenging and came as a fitting climax to an inspiring morning session. 

After a closing prayer by Rev. V. W. Sears the meeting was adjourned 
for lunch. 

AFTERNOON SESSION 

The afternoon session was opened by singing the hymn, "Thy King- 
dom is Coming." The Memorial Meditation was led by Mrs. W. O. Pocle 
of Thomasville for those of our dead, as follows: Mrs. M. E. Lanning, 
Mrs. Spurgeon Ayers, Mrs. R. I. Palmer. 

Reportof the Margaret Fund was brought by Mrs. R. G. Jennings, Chm. 
who stated that the 19 girls in our Training School from North Carolina 
were remembered this year by a gift of a box of stationary. They are like- 
wise benefitted by gifts from the Burney Fund. 

Mrs. Victor L. Andrews, Chairman of Training School, presented an 
enjoyable original playlet on the benefits of Training School education. 

The Young People's Hour under the direction of Miss Beatrice Council 
proved a most interesting period with Panel Discussion by a number of 
young people of the needs and challenges of W. M. U. activities. 



Liberty Baptist Association 



35 



Special Music by the Mills Home Choir thrilled everyone present. 

Miss Daphne Penny of the Baptist Hospital brought a very interesting 
account on "Work with our young people." 

"The Task and Opportunity" was the title of Mrs. R. K. Redwine's 
closing address. 

Report of NOMINATING COMMITTEE, Mrs. R. L. Palmer, Chm. 

Superintendent Mrs. C. B. Atkinson 

Associate Supt Mrs. P. M. Hendricks 

Secretary and Treasurer Mrs. F. H. Wall 

Young People's Leader Miss Beatrice Council 

Mission Study Chairman Mrs. N. C. Teague 

Community Mission Chairman Mrs. Victor L. Andrews 

Literature Chairman Mrs. J. N. Shockey 

Training School and Margaret Fund Mrs. R. G. Jennings 

Stewardship Chairman Mrs. Beamer Barnes 

Interracial Chairman Mrs. C. C. Wall 

R. A. Leader Rev. N. C. Teague 

The Pagent "O Zion Haste" under the direction of Miss Council and 
featuring a number of students from Mills Home was a beautiful finale to 
a day spent in plans for forwarding God's Kingdom Work. 

The Spirit of the entire meeting can best be summed up in the report 
of the Resolution Committee: "Will the members of this church please 
stand? I want to see your hortesses. We love this church. You who make 
up its membership are so generous with your beautiful building. You are 
constantly opening your doors to meetings of this type. If you were not 
so generous and gracious with your hospitality the Liberty Association 
Organizations that meet here from time to time, might feel that they were 
imposing upon your good nature. 

But this is not at all our feeling today. When we reached the door your 
beautiful flowers welcomed us. Then your comfortable building warmed us. 
Your service and food at the noon hour refreshed us. And in the hands of 
your pastor's charming wife, even the cloudy, threatening skies which un- 
der ordinary conditions would have depressed us, were turned into a very 
special greeting for this particular group. 

We feel that it is in order to express our thanks to the Associational 
Officers who have brought such splendid reports of work done. 

The possibilities that might be bound up in that group of 81 potential 
teachers to Mission Study classes who attended the Institute at Erlanger, 
challenge us. 

The report of your Community Mission Chm. showing in such a force- 
ful manner the hosts of unsaved about, makes us humbly realize how far 
short some of v us have fallen in this field of service. 

The presentation of the Seven Fold plan by your Stewardship Chm. 
inspires us to incorporate the principles in our daily living. 

The challenge of Christian Literature as presented not only made us 
want to subscribe to the peroidioals, but also tended to soften our hearts 
even toward the proverbical book agent. 

To our efficient Secretary we extend our thanks. 

To Mrs. Teague for her untiring efforts in accomplishing a most difi- 
oult task we give our gratitude and deepest appreciation. Her report stands 
on its merits and portrays better than any words of ours — a work well done. 

The reports on the Margaret Fund and Training School have given us 



36 



Minutes of the 



a more comprehensive view of our educational progress. 

The visiting speakers have laid upon our hearts anew our opportuni- 
ties and responsibilities as Christian Women in the home, with our young 
people in our communities and in the world — for this we thank Rev. Galli- 
more, Mrs. Redwine, Miss Penny and Miss Council with her large group of 
young people who have cooperated and speak for her is the evidence of the 
outstanding piece of work done by our Young People's Leader. 

These friends have all come aside from busy lives to inspire us to be 
better servants in the Master's Vineyard. We thank you." 

Mrs. I. G. Greer, Chm. 
Mrs. R. S. Green, Mrs. D. L. Morgan 

The Committee on Time and Place announce Churchland our next 
place of meeting in April, 1947. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Mrs. N. C. Teague, Supt. 

Mrs. F. H. Wall, Sec. 

W. M. U. FINANCIAL REPORT 



Receipts for 1944— Jan. 1, Balance in bank $11.18 

April, For World Relief 26.46 

Associational Expense Fund__ 24.55 

Gifts .77 

$62.96 

Disbursements for 1944 — 

April 26, Check to Mr. Huggins (World Relief) $26.46 

April 26, For Programs 1.50 

May, Miss Olive Lauton 5.00 

June, Mrs. N. C. Teague (Expenses) 15.00 

June, Mrs. Frank Houser 5.00 

Sept. 30, Mrs. N. C. Teague __ 5.00 

Jan., Miss Beatrice Council — 5.00 

$62.96 

Receipts for 1945— Associational Expense Fund $86.21 

Disbursements for 1945— - - 75.75 

Balance $10.46 

April, Miss Hattie Gardner $ 5.00 

" Mrs. N. C. Teague (Expenses) 15.00 

" Miss Beatrice Council 5.00 

For Programs . 1.75 

Oct. 5, Miss Council (For Y. P. Conference) 10.00 

Oct. 18, Mrs. Frank Hauser__ — 5.00 

Oct. 18, Gift for Mrs. Mason 5.00 

Feb. 18, Mrs. C. B. Atkinson 10.00 

Feb. 22, Miss Council 4.00 

April 10, Mrs. Teague (Love Gi?t)____ - 15.00 

$75.75 



Liberty Baptist Association 



37 



MINUTES of Training Union 

The quarterly mass meeting of the Liberty Associational Training 
Union met Sept. 23, 1945 with the First Church, Lexington; Mrs. Austin 
Sink presiding. 

The meeting opened with quiet music and song service led by Miss 
Wanna Faye Laws. Rev. V. W. Sears conducted the devotional. 

There were 219 present with 13 churches represented. Reid Street 
won the attendance banner with Reeds tying for second place. 

A nominating committee composed of Rev. V. W. Sears, Chm., J. B. 
Powel and Mrs. Beamer Barnes submitted the following report: 

Director Mrs. Austin Sink 

Associate Director H. L. Banks, Jr 

Secretary-Treasurer Miss Patty McCaskill 

Chorister Carey J. Davis 

Pianist Miss Wanna Faye Lav/s 

Adult Leader F. B. Edwards 

Young People's Leader Miss Dorcus Clinard 

Intermediate Leader Mrs. C. B. Atkinson 

Junior Leader Miss Pauline Gilliam 

Story Hour Leader Mrs. J. W. Byars 

Special music was furnished by Mr. Bob Bruton and a duet from 
Erlanger church. The inspirational message was delivered by Miss Mar- 
garet Sparks, State Intermediate Leader. 

The meeting adjourned; next meeting to be with Mills Home Church. 
Mrs. Austin Sink, Director 
Miss Patty McCaskill, Secretary 

The Associational simultaneous Training Union mass meeting was held 
Dec. 7, 1945 with the Mills Home Church; Mrs. Austin Sink, presiding. 

The meeting was opened with the playing of selected Christmas Car- 
ols and group singing led by W. B. Lord. 

There were 147 present with 7 churches represented. The theme was 
"Launching Our Associational Program for 1946." Mrs. Austin Sink pre- 
sented the Associational goals, the departmental goals were given by the 
following: 

Adults — F. B. Edwards Junior — Miss Pauline Gilliam 

Young People — Miss Dorcus Clinard Story Hour — Mrs. J. W. Byars 
Intermediate — Miss Mabel Hepler 
A playlet entitled "The Call of the New Baptist Century" was pre- 
sented by the following from Mills Home: John Benfield, Betty Gurly, 
Iola Batts, Robert Beach, Louise Snead, Lalah Downing, Myrtle Huffman, 
Goldie Walsh, Edith Mauney, and Donald Myers; with aocompaniment at 
the organ by Mre. W. B. Lord. 

The meeting was adjourned with benediction by Rev. J. Roy Clifford. 
Mrs. Austin Sink, Director 
Miss Patty McCaskill, Secretary 

The quarterly mass meeting of the Liberty Associational Training 
Union met at Churohland, Jan. 27, 1946. The meeting was opened with 
the singing of two old favorite hymns; "Trust and Obey," and "All Hail 
the Power of Jesus' Name." After a good response of singing, Rev. V. L. 
Andrews led our devotional period. 

There was 183 present with 11 churches represented. Churchland won 
the attendance banner with Reid Street second. 



38 



Minutes of the 



Department conferences were held on the subject "Promotion of Better 
Programs at Weekly Meetings" with the following Associational officers in 
charge: Mrs. Austin Sink, F. B. Edwards, Dorcus Clinard, Mrs. C. B. Atkin- 
son, Pauline Gilliam and Verna Mae Kanoy. 

The Nominating Committee submitted this list of additional officers: 

Group directors: 

Secretary— Miss Kathryn Miller # 1— James Honeycutt 

Pastor-Advisor — Rev. J. A. Neilson # 2 — H. W. Buchanon 

# 3— Mrs. Ben Carroll 
The benediction was pronounced by Rev. J. Roy Clifford, and the 
meeting adjourned. 

Mrs. Austin Sink, Director 
Miss Kathryn Miller, Secretary 

The quarterly mass meeting of the Liberty Associational Training 
Union met with Rich Fork, March 24, 1946. The meeting was opened with 
the singing of "All Hail the Power of Jesus' Name" with Rev. R. L. Kiser 
conducting the devotionals. 

There was 205 present with 16 churches represented. Churchland won 
the attendance banner. 

"Lead on O King Eternal" was sung by the congregation while the 
contestants were getting ready for the elimination contest. The following 
churches were represented in the contest: Lexington 1st, Mills Home and 
Churchland. The winners were as follows: 
Adult Scripture Reading— Miss Hazel Grady, 1st Church, Lexington. 
Better Speakers' Tournament — Catherine Greer, 1st Church, Lexington. 
Intermediate Sword Drill — Mary Alice Wilson, 1st Church, Lexington. 
Junior Memory Work— Raymond Ball, Mary Ann Johnson, Joy Marshall, 

Gail Ball, and Frances King, of Mills Home, Thomasville. 
Hymn Festival— 1st Church, Lexington. 
These winners will participate in the Regional Contest to be held 
with the First Church, Lexington, April 26-27. 

Benediction was pronounced by Rev. E. F. Baker. 

Mrs. Austin Sink, Director 
Miss Kathryn Miller, Secretary 

The quarterly mass meeting of the Liberty Associational Traicing 
Union met with Reeds Church June 30, 1946. The meeting opened with 
the singing of the hymn "Blessed Assurance" led by H. L. Banks, Jr. 
Rev. J. W. Dickens led the devotionals. 

There was 80 present with 6 churches represented. Liberty won the 
attendance banner with Churchland second. 

Department conferences were held and led by the following officers: 
Mrs. Austin Sink, H. L. Banks, Jr., Rev. C. B. Atkinson, Miss Pearl York, 
Mrs. C. B. Atkinson. 

A general discussion of the enlargement campaign to be conducted 
July 14-20 followed the conference period. 

The announcement was made that the following contestants won in 
the state Junior memory work: Raymond Ball, Gail Ball, and Frances 
King of Mills Home. 

The meeting adjourned with prajer by Rev. Chas. F. Leek. 
Mrs. Austin Sink, Director 
Miss Kathryn Miller, Secretary 



Liberty Baptist Association 



39 



Historical Table of the Association 

Year WHERE HELD PREACHER MODERATOR CLERK 

1832... 1 Jamestown Geo. W. Purefoy Wm. Bureh Peter Owen 

1833... Hollowaya Joeiah Wiseman Eli Carroll Peter Owen 

1834... Abbotts Creek Eli Carroll Eli Carroll Peter Owen 

1835... Liberty John Culpepper Eli Carroll Peter Owen 

1836... Jersey Eli Carroll Eli Carroll Peter Owen 

1837... Lick Creek Peter Owen Eli Carroll Peter Owen 

1838... Abbotts Creek Benjamin Lanier Eli Carroll Peter Owen 

1839. ..2 Pine Meeting H ...Eli Carroll Eli Carroll Peter Owen 

1840... Hollowaya Joeiah Wiseman Eli Carroll Peter Owen 

1841... New Friendship Benjamin Lanier Gershom Tussey Peter Owen 

1842... Reeds X Roads Barton Roby Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

1843... Lick Creek Benjamin Lanier Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

1844... Abbotts Creek Wm. Turner Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

1845... Jersey Alfred Kinney Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

1846... Lick Creek Wm. Turner Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

1847... Abbotts Creek Wm. Turner Banjamin Lanier Azariah Williame 

1848... Reeds X Roads Benjamin Lanier Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

1849. ..3 Big Creek Azariah Williams Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

1850. ..1 Jamestown Benjamin Lanier Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

1851... Liberty Wm. Turner Wm. Turner Azariah Williams 

1852... Holloways Z. Minor Wm. Turner Azariah Williams 

1853... Abbotts Creek Benjamin Lanier Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

1854... Reeds X Roads Alfred Kinney Joseph Spurgeon Azariah Williams 

1855... Lick Creek Benjamin Lanier Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

1856... Abbotts Creek (Unknown) Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

1857... Reeds X Roads Wm. Lambeth Amos Weaver Azariah Williams 

1858... Holloways Amos Weaver Amos Weaver Azariah Williams 

1859... New Friendship Benjamin Lanier Benjamin Lanier J. H. Owen 

1860... Abbotts Creek Wm. Turner Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

1861... Jersey J. B. Jackson J. B. Jackson Azariah Williams 

1862... Lick Creek F. H.. Jones J. B. Jackson Azariah Williams 

1863... Abbotts Creek T. W. Tobey J. B. Jackson Azariah Williams 

1864... Thomasville W. H. Hammer Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

1865... (No Session Held ...On Account of Conditions Caused ...By Civil War) 

1866... Lick Creek W. T. Waters Benjamin Lanier J. H. Owen 

1867... Abbotts Creek Benjamin Lanier Benjamin Lanier J. H. Owen 

1868... Jersey W. H. Hammer Benjamin Lanier J. H. Owen 

1869... Abbotts Creek A. P. Stokes Wm. Turner J. H. Owen 

1870. ..3 Big Creek Wm. Turner Wm. Turner J. H. Owen 

1871. .2 Pine Meeting H W. H. Wingate Wm. Turner J. H. Owen 

1872... New Friendship H. Morton J. H. Brooks J. L. Pleasant 

1873... Holloways Thomas Carrick H.Morton Thomas Carrick 

1874... Lick Creek A. F. Reid Win. Turner Thomas Carrick 

1875.. .4 Muddy Creek C. T. Bailey Wm. Turner Thomas Carrick 

1876... Reeds X Roads H. W. Reinhart Wm. Turner Thomas Carrick 

1877... High Point J. B. Richardson Wm. Turner Henry Sheets 

1878... 3 Big Creek H. W. Reinhart H. W. Reinhart Henry Sheets 

1879... Liberty Harvey Hatcher H. W. Reinhart Henry Sheets 

1880... Holloways S. F. Conrad H. W. Reinhart Henry Sheets 

1881... Jersey Henry Sheets H. W. Reinhart Henry Sheets 

1882... 4 Muddy Creek S.H.Thompson H. W. Reinhart Henry Sheets 

1883... 2 Pine Meeting H O. F. Gregory H. W. Reinhart Henry Sheets 

1884... Summerville S.H.Thompson Wm. Turner Henry Sheets 

1885... Lexington J. B. Richardson Wm. Turner Henry Sheets 

1886... Abbotts Creek J.B.Richardson Wm. Turner Henry Sheets 

1887... Lick Creek Henry Sheets James Smith Henry Sheets 

1888... Reeds X Roads C. Durham Wm. Turner Henry Sheets 

1889... New Friendship W. F. Watson James Smith Henry Sheets 

1890... Jersey..... J.M.Bennett James Smith Henry Sheets 

1891... 2 Pine Meeting H J. K. Fant James Smith Henry Sheets 



Minutes of the 



Year WHERE HELD PREACHER MODERATOR CLERK 

1892... High Point Henry Sheets James Smith Henry Sheets 

1893... Kernersville R. T. Byran James Smith Henry Sheets 

1894... Holloways R. Vandeventer James Smith Henry Sheets 

1895... Pleasant Grove J. H. Hilliard James Smith Henry Sheets 

1896... Denton Henry Sheets James Smith Henry Sheets 

1897. ..5 Piney Grove W. H. Rich James Smith Henry Sheets 

1898... Rich Fork J. H. Lambeth James Smith Henry Sheets 

1899... Abbotts Creek S. B. Wilson James Smith Henry Sheets 

1900... Reeds X Roads W. H. Rich James Smith Henry Sheets 

1901... Lexington C. A. G. Thomas James Smith Henry Sheets 

1902... Lick Creek Henry Sheets James Smith Henry Sheets 

1903... Jersey W. A. Smith James Smith Henry Sheets 

1904.. .2 Pine Meeting H ...Geo. P. Harrill James Smith Henry Sheets 

1905... New Friendship John R. Miller James Smith Henry Sheets 

1906... Thomasville.. J. S. Farmer James Smith Henry Sheets 

1907... Wallburg Dr. R. T. Vann J. W. Nowell P. S. Vann 

1908... Denton M. L. Kesler J. W. Nowell P. S. Vann 

1909... Liberty S. D. Swaim Henry Sheets P. S. Vann 

1910... Orphanage O. A. Keller Henry Sheets P. S. Vann 

1911... Abbotts Creek G. A. Martin Henry Sheets P. S. Vann 

1912... Stoners Grove O. A. Keller Henry Sheets P. S. Vann 

1913... Rich Fork M. L. Kesler Henrp Sheets P. S. Vann 

1914... Holloways G. A. Martin G. A. Martin Henry Sheets 

1915... Center Hill O. A. Keller O. A. Keller Henry Sheets 

1916... Wallburg I. M. Mercer O. A. Keller Henry Sheets 

1917... Smith Grove Fred D. Hale R.S.Green Henry Sheets 

1918... Lexington M. L. Kesler R.S.Green Archibald Johnson 

1919... Denton R. E. White R. S. Green Archibald Johnson 

1920... New Friendship J. S. Hardaway R. S. Green Archibald Johnson 

1921... Churchland M. L. Kesler R. S. Green Archibald Johnson 

1922... Summerville W. A. Hough R.S.Green Paul C. Newton 

1923... Abbotts Creek W. L. Barrs Archibald Johnson ...Paul C. Newton 

1924... Reeds C. H. Trueblood ....Archibald Johnson ...Sam J. Smith 

1925... Liberty C. A. Owens Archibald Johnson ...Sam J. Smith 

1926... Rich Fork ...E. N. Gardner Archibald Johnson ...Sam J. Smith 

1927... Thomasville H. T. Penry Archibald Johnson ...Sam J. Smith 

1928... Holloways M. L. Kesler Archibald JohnBon ...Sam J. Smith 

1929... Stoners Grove J. M. Hays Archibald Johnson ...Sam J. Smith 

1930... Abbotts Creek M. L. Kesler Archibald Johnson ...Sam J. Smith 

1931... Denton M. O. Alexander G. Wilson Miller Sam J. Smith 

1932... Lexington..... G. A. Martin G. Wilson Miller Sam J. Smith 

1933... Lick Creek E. F. Mumford G. Wilson Miller Sam J. Smith 

1934... Jersey W. L. Warfford G. Wilson Miller Sam J. Smith 

1935... Mills Home E. C. Roach R. D. Covington Sam J. Smith 

1936... Reeds J. A. Neilson .R. D. Covington Sam J. Smith 

1937... Churchland W. K. McGee R. D. Covingtoa Sam J. Smith 

1938... Denibon John A. McMillian G. Wilson Miller Sam J. Smith 

1939... Wallburg H. M. Stroup R. D. Covington Sam J. Smith 

1940... Center Hill L. S. Gaines R. D. Covington Sam J. Smith 

1941... New Friendship N. C. Teague R. D. Covington Sam J. Smith 

1942... Abbotts Creek R. A. Herring H. M. Stroup Sam J. Smith 

1943... Lexington B. A. Mitchell H. M. Stroup Sam J. Smith 

1944... Thomasville... C. B. Atkinson H. M. Stroup A. L. Snider 

1945... Jersey V. W. Sears N. C. Teague A. L. Snider 

1946... Denton J. Roy Clifford N. C. Teague A. L. Snider 

1. Now is High Point 4. Now is Clemmonsville 

2. Now is Churchland 5. Now is Wallburg 

3. Now is Eldorado 



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Liberty Baptist Association 



Map of Liberty Baptist Association 




4 



t> . ——J 



1 



Liberty Baptist Association f 



The next Session will be held September 28 th and 29 th, 2948 
With the Smith's Grove Baptist Church 
Rt. 1, Linwood, N. C. 




8 



North Carolina 



1947 



6 
I 

One Hundred and Fifteenth Annual Session 5 

a 

Held With g 

WALLBURG BAPTIST CHURCH !5 

I 

Wallburg, N. C. 8 

j 

September 30th and October 1st, 1947 g 



8 



Liberty Baptist Association 

North Carolina 

1947 

* ft * 

One Hundred and Fifteenth Annual Session 

Held With 

WALLBURG BAPTIST CHURCH 

Wallburg, N. G 
September 30 th and October 1st, 1947 

* ft * 



- The next Session will be held September 28 th and 29 th, 1948 
With the Smith's Grove Baptist Church 
Rt. 1, Linwood, N. C. 



Minutes ef the 



INDEX 

Addresses 11-33 

Annual Sermon 12 

Contitution and By-Laws 3 

Committee Reports— Finance 20 

New Churches 13 

Next Year's Reporters 19 

Nominating 20 

Program 9 

Resolutions 19 

Time, Place and Preacher 19 

Dedication of Minutes 30, 35 

Directories — Asssciational 5 

Auxiliaries 5 

Choir 6 

Church — _6 

State Institutions 6 

Historical Table 50 

Map of Association 52 

Messengers to Association 7 

Minutes— Baptist Training Union 42 

Woman's Missionary Union 36 

Proceedings Begin 9 

Reports — American Bible Society 26 

Baptist Training Union 20 

Christian Education 13 

Christian Literature 21 

Church Music 10 

Home Missions 27 

Hospital 14 

Foreign Missions 31 

Mills Home 15 

Obituaries 29 

Radio and Baptist Hour 30 

Relief and Annuity 25 

Public Morals 24 

State of Churches 12 

State Missions 16 

Sunday Shool 17 

Treasurer 18 

Woman's Missionary Union 23 

Statistical Tables 44-49 



Liberty Baptist Association 



3 



Constitution and By-Laws 

NAME 

Article 1. The name of the body shall be "The Liberty Baptist 
Association." 

OBJECT 

Article 2. It shall be the object of this Association to furnish the 
Gospel (as we hold it) to the people within the bounds of tie Association, 
and to co-operate with the Baptist State Convention. 

MEMBERSHIP 

Article 3. The Association shall consist of the officers of the Associa- 
tion, pastors of the churches of the Association, and messengers from the 
churches. Each shall be entitled to 3 messengers and one additional messen- 
ger for every 50 members or fraction thereof over and above 100 members. 

OFFICERS 

Article 4. The officers of this Association shall be a moderator, vice- 
moderator, a treasurer and a clerk, all of whom shall be elected each year 
by the Associotion at its annual meeting and shall hold office until their 
successors are elected. The duties of the officers shall correspond to the 
duties of the same officers in like organizations, or as denned by the Asso- 
ciation from time to time. 

BOARD and COMMITTEES 

Articles 5. The Association shall elect an Executive Committee each 
year whose duties shall be to look after having the gospel preached in all 
parts of the Association, and to attend to all business in the Association 
between the session and to make such reports as they deem advisable at 
the annual meeting of the Association. The Association may appoint or 
elect such other boards or committees from time to time as circumstances 
may require: 

TIME of MEETING 

Article 6. The Asssociation shall meet annually on Tuesday after the 
fourth Sunday in September. The Moderator may at the request of the 
Executive Committee change the time and place of meeting of this Asso- 
ciation when it may be deemed by him not expedient to meet at the time 
or place appointed. (Article 6 amended as above Sept. 6, 1944,) 

VACANCIES 

Article 7. The Moderator in concurrence with the Executive Com- 
mittee may fill any vacancy occuring between meeting of the Association. 

AMENDMENTS 

Article 8. This Constitution may be amended at any regular session 
of the Association by a two-thirds vote of the number present. 

BY-LAWS 

No By-Laws adopted. This Association follows Kerfoot's Rules of 
Order for Parliamentary Authority. 

STANDING RESOLUTIONS 

ORDINATION OF NEW MINISTERS 
(As recommended by the Executive Committee and Adopted by the Association) 
See Page 27, 1939 Minutes. 

1. That when a church desires to put forth a candidate for examin- 
ation and approval for ordination to the full work of the Gospel Ministry, 
an Examining Council be summoned by written invitation of at least one 
week in advance from the church nominating the candidate, the Council to 
include the pastor and one member-at-large from each Baptist Church in 
the fellowship of the Association. 



4 Minutes of the 



2. That the examination of the candidate be conducted publicly in the 
auditorium of the nominating church, and prior announcement given in good 
time so that all the brethren who wish to do so may attend the examination- 

3. That we ordain only those who have received definate call to be- 
come pastor of a Baptist Church in regular standing in its Association 
which church shall have requested his ordination. 

Organization and Admission of New Churches 
It is recommended that any group of individuals desiring to organize 
themselves into a new church with the purpose of seeking the recognition 
of and the fellowship and co-operation with this Association, be requested 
to fulfill the following requirements: 

1. Notice shall be given to the Moderator cf the Association of the 
desire to organize a church before any such organization takes place. The 
Moderator will then ask the Promotion Executive Committee to study and 
pass upon the need of and the practicability for such an organization. 

2. The location of said church shall be sufficiently removed so as not 
to interfere with the work or encroach upon the territory of the churches 
already affiliated with the Association. This will be determined by the 
Promotion Executive Committee. 

3. Upon being approved by the Promotion Executive Committee the 
group will then request a council to examine the church covenant and the 
articles of faith of the proposed church. It is recommended that this coun- 
cil consist of three pastors and three laymen of the Association appointed by 
the Moderator. Should this council approve the covenant and articles of 
faith, the group will then proceed to be constituted into a Baptist Church 
of the same faith and order. 

4. The new church, having been duly organized and constituted, may 
at the next annual Association present a letter to the Assomtion askmg 
for recognition and seeking fellowship with the Association, including with 
th s lettS a copy of the Articles of Faith and the Church Covenant ^ adopt- 
ed by the bodyf as wall as a report of the work since time of organization 
as it regards all phases of our Baptist Program of Misssons, Evangelism. 
Education, Social Service, Training and Worship. 

5. The previously appointed council of three pastors and three lay- 
men will examine the letter and reports of the newly organized church, and 
will recommend to the Association its acceptance or rejection as the case 
may be. (See page 20, 1941 Minutes.) 

Resolution in Regard to Program Committee 
The following resolution was offered and adopted: 

That the Program Committee consist of the officers of the Asso ciation, 
pastors of the entertaining churches 

Moderator during the session of the Association. (See pg. 31, 1941 Minutes; 
Resolution in Regard to Messengers 
The following resolution was offered and adopted: 

That the names of messengers printed in the minutes include > only 
those actually attending the Association from the delegations elected by 
the churches. (See page 31, 1941 Minutes.) 

Associational Executive Committee 

(The following was adopted. See page 38, 1942 Minutes) 

Your committee recommends that: An executive committee oi ^the AmoJ 
ciation be formed of 7 members, including the Moderator and Clerk of the 
Association the Chairman of the Executive-Promotion Committee and 4 
o\he^^ by the Association along with the other officers of 

?hrASociSf the Committee to attend to Associational business be- 
tween the annual meeting, their actions to be reported to and reviewed by 
the Association annually (This Executive Committee will transact Amo- 
^I^iuM the Promotion-Executive Committee will promote the 
Association and Co-operative Program as formely.) 



Liberty Baptist Association 



5 



[All Addresses herein are in North Carolina unless otherwise indicated] 

Directory of Association 

Officers 

Rev. N. C. Teague, Moderator Rt. 3, Lexington 

J. O. Walton, Vice-Moderator Thomasville 

A. L. Snider, Clerk and Treasurer Box 96, Denton. 

Promotion Executive Committee 
NAME CHURCH ADDRESS 

Rev. E. F. Baker, Chm New Friendship Rt. 5, Winston-Salem 

Dan S. Hay worth Abbotts Creek Rt. 2, High Point 

Willie Gillam ...Carolina Avenue Thomasville 

D. L. Tysinger Center Hill Rt. 6, Lexington 

L. E. Rickard Churchland Rt. 1, Lin wood 

A. L. Snider Denton Box 96, Denton 

E. C. Haynes Erlanger Erlanger 

D. L. Owen Floyd Rt. 6, Lexington 

W. H. Hilton Greenwood Thomasville 

G. C. Palmer Holloways Rt. 6. Lexington 

H. L. Palmer Jersey Rt. 1, Linwood 

Charles Sigmon Lake View „ Rt. 1, Linwood 

Sam J. Smith Lexington Lexington 

O. F. Hughes Liberty Rt. 2, Thomasville 

B. C. Cole Lick Creek High Rock 

C. F. Motsinger New Friendship Rt. 5, Winston-Salem 

I. G. Greer Mills Home .„ Thomasville 

Jeff L. Carrick Mountain View Rt. 6. Lexington 

K. C. Lambeth Oak Hill Memorial Rt. 2, Thomasville 

None Pleasant Plains 

J. C. Leonard ....Reeds Rt. 3, Lexington 

Millard Wilson ...Reid Street 206 June St.. Thomasville 

Willie Bowers Rich Fork Rt. 1, Thomasville 

J. W. Byars Sheets Memorial Lexington 

G. E. Moorefield Smith Grove Rt. 4, Thomaevil'e 

Edd Epps South Side Thomasville 

L. E. Lookabill Stoners Grove Southmont 

L. C. Carrick Summerviile Rt. 1, Denton 

None Taylors Grove 

S. R. Laws Thomasville Thomasville 

None Wallburg 

Joe Pierce Walters Grove Rt. 2, Lexington 

M. L. Craver - Welcome Welcome 

The Moderator, Clerk, and all Pastor3 of the Association Ex-Officio Members. 
(See page 13, 1933 Minutes) 

Associations! Executive Committee 

Rev. N. C. Teagae Rt. 3, Lexington C. V. Teague Wallburg 

A. L. Snider Box 96, Denton Rev. Chas. F. Leek Thomasville 

Rev. E. F. Baker Rt. 5, Winston-Salem W. H. Lomax Rt. 1, Linwood 

Rev. C. C. Matheny Erlanger 

Associational Missionary or other paid employee None 

Standing Committees None 

Associational Auxiliaries 

W. M. U. Convention 

Mrs. P. M. Hendricks, Supt Lexington 

Mrs. Fletcher H. Wall, Sec.-Treas Lexington 

Miss Betrice Council, Y. P. Director Thomasville 

Sunday School Convention 

J. D, Fraley, Supt Mill Home, Thomasville 

Clay Vann Teague, Asst. Supt Wallburg 

Sam Smith, Sec.-Treas Lexington 

Rex Sprinkle, Choister Rt. 5, Winston-Salem 

Miss Wanna Fay Laws, Pianist.,. Thomasville 

B. T. U. Convention 

J. H. Honeycutt, President Mills Home, Thomasville 

Secretary , 

Baptist Brotherhood 

Associational Representative No Church has a Brotherhood 



6 



Minutes of the 



State Institutions * 

(Located Within the Bounds of the Association) 

Mills Home, Thomasville, N. C. 

Dr. I. G. Greer. General Superintendent Thomasville 

Dr. Zeno Wall, Chm. Board of Directors Shelby 

J. D. Fraley, Treasurer „ Thomasville 

Officers, Baptist Schools, State Boards and Institutions 

(Residing Within the Association) 

Loyd Philpott, Jr., Trustee Mills Home _ Lexington 

L. A. Martin, Trustee Meredith College Lexington 

C. C. Wall, Trustee Wake Forest College Lexington 

J. A. McMillian, Editor Charity and Children „ „ Thomasville 

Rev. J. Roy Clifford, Member General Board r Lexington 

Church Directory 

(Ordained Ministers holding Membership in the Liberty Baptist Association) 

NAME WORK CHURCH ADDRESS 

Andrews, V. L Pastor Churchland Rt. 1, Linwood 

Baker, S. D Pastor South Side Thomasville 

Baker, E. F Pastor New Friendship Rt. 5, Winston-Salem 

Broadway, J. V Pastor High Rock Mission Rt. 1, Thomasville 

Clifford, J. Roy Pastor Lexington lsb Lexington 

Combs, J. A Retired Thomasville Thomasville 

Dickens, J. W Pastor Cen ter Hill & Smith Grove... Rt. 6, Lexington 

Digh, D. W Pastor Sheets Memorial Lexington 

Dunn, J. V Pastor Lake View Box 95, Spencer 

Eddinger, C. C Pastnr Stoners Grove -....Southmont 

Gallimore, A. R Missionary Lexington Wake Forest 

Hopkins, W. B , Pastor Walters Grove,' China Grove 

Hartman, O. M Pastor Welcome Rt. 2, Winston-Salem 

Jarrett, J. F Teacher Center Hill Rt. 6, Lexington 

Kiser, R. L Pastor Reid Street Thomasville 

Kinkade, Bill Pastor Glennanna Thomasville 

Leek, Charles F Pastor Thomasville Thomasville 

Lanning, Conrad Not Stated Churchland Rt. 1, Linwood 

Maier, F. A Retired Thomasville Thomasville 

Martin, G. A Retired Thomasville Thomasville 

Mathney, C. C Pastor Erlanger Erlanger 

McMillian, J. A Editor Mills Home Thomasville 

Mitchell, B. A Pastor Abbotts Creek „..Rt. 1, Kernersville 

Oldham, Dave Pastor Greenwood Rt. 2, High Point 

Oates, C. M .. Pastor Carolina Avenue Thomasville 

Philpott, Harry M Teacher Lexington Gainsville, Florida 

Roach, E. C Pastor Denton Denton 

Tally, Carl A Pastor Summerville ... 1414 E. 21st, Winston-Salem 

Teague, N. C Pastor Reeds Rt. 3, Lexington 

Walton, J. O Pastor Mills Home Thomasville 

Wilson, S. B Pastor Union Grove... 1005 Franklin St. Winston-S. 

Young, Charles, Jr Pastor Mountain View Lexington 

Ministerial Students Ministers Ordained this Year 

Baker, Furney New Friendship Church ., , , . , , 

Everhart, Bill. Lexington 1st Church Andrews, Edward Churchland Church 

Helpler, Stewart Liberty Church Young, Chas. Jr Sheets Memo. Church 

Lanning, E. R Lexington 1st Church 

Morefield, G. E Smith Grove Church Missionary 

Rodgers, Ralph Lexington 1st Church 

Yarbrough, Ray Sheets Memo. Church Gallimore, Rev. A. R. ...Lexington Church 

Carlton, Howard Sheets Memo. Cnurcn 

Assistants to Pastors or Educational Directors 
Miss Dorthy Loftin First Church Lexington 

Choir Directors 

CHURCH NAME ADDRESS 

Abbotts Creek Carey J. Davis Rt. 2, High Point 

Carolina Avenue Hugh Chisholm Thomasville 

Center Hill Wade Jarrett Rt. 6, Lexington 

Churhhland Peggy Barnes Rt. 5, Lexington 

Denton Mrs. Bob Carroll Rt. 2, Lexington 



Liberty Baptist Association 



7 



CHURCH NAME ADDRESS 

Erlanger E. T. McDade Erlanger 

Floyd Miss Maggie Floyd Rt. 6, Lexington 

Greenwood Miss Mildred Lackey Thomasville 

High Rock Mission Mrs. Z. Morgan High Rock 

Holloways G. C. Palmer Rt. 6, Lexington 

Jersey R. L. Palmer Linwood 

Lake View Mrs. Charles Sigmon Rt. 1, Linwood 

Lexington Mrs. L. A. Martin Lexington 

Liberty Miss Ruby Wray Rt. 2, Thomasville 

Lick Creek Mis Ruth Cole High Rock 

Mills Home W. B. Lord Thomasville 

Mountain View Mallary Carrick Rt. 6, Lexington 

New Friendship Reed Hartman Rt. 5, Winston-Salem 

Oak Hill Richard Jarrett Thomasville 

Pleasant Plains None Reported R ~. 

Reeds Homer Craver Rt. 3, Lexington 

Ried Street E. L. Byerly Thomasville 

Rich Fork Joyce Conrad Thomasville 

Sheets Memorial Finley Carlton Lexington 

Smith Grove L. R. Swmson Rt. 5, Lexington 

South Side Johnny Creed Thomasville 

Stoners Grove H. T. Penry Southmont 

Summerville Mrs. Emma Carrick Rt. 1, Denton 

Taylors Grove None Reported 

Thomasville Mrs. C. F. Finch Thomasville 

Union Grove None Reported 

Wallburg Mrs. Ben King Wallburg 

Walters Grove Everett Pierce ~ Rt. 2, Lexington 

Welcome Mrs. W. W. Brinkley Welcome 

Glennanna Mission None Reported _.. 

Messengers to the Association 

ABBOTTS CREEK: John Welborn, Jr., W. P. Davis, Mrs. W. P. Davis, Ray Hay worth, 
D. S. Hayworth, Maggie Welborn. Grace Welborn, Mrs. Chas. Carmichael, Clyde Boden- 
heimer, Mrs. Charlie Bodenheimer, Sharyn Bodenheimer, Mrs. Willie Bodenheimer, Mrs. 
Richard Rothrock, Bess Wheeler, C. B. Davis, Minnie Hayworth, Clarence F. Moore, W. A. 
McCuistoti, Laura Moore, Frances Davis, Mr. & Mrs. John Spurgeon, Mrs. Clyde Spurgeon, 
Billie Ann Welborn, Betty Rose Welborn, Mrs. Walter McCuiston, Betty Clinard, Maxine 
Hayworth, Betty Honeycutt, Mary Hudson, Carley Bodenheimer, Mrs. J. W. Welborn, 
Carey DaviB. 

CAROLINA AVENUE: Nat Buckner, C. M. Oates, Gaye Lanier, Mrs. Nat Buckner, Mrs. 

C. M. Oates, George Poole, Mrs. Hugh Crisholm, Mrs. Willie Gilliam. 
CENTER HILL: Mrs. D. B. Hunt, Rev. & Mrs. J. W. Dickens, Annie Owens, Mrs. Howard 

Park, Mrs. Clinton Mabry Mr. & Mrs. Wade Jarrett, S. E. Jarrett, Mrs. H. W. Brown. 
CHURCHLAND: V. L. Andrews. 

DENTON: W. R. Snider, Mrs. Commodore Johnson, Mr. & Mrs. H. C. Keever, R. C. Wall, 
Mrs. Hoke Morris, Mrs. J. R. Smith, Mrs. C. E. Clayett, Mrs. R. C. Wall, Rev. & Mrs. E. C 
Roach, Mrs.E. L. Gallimore, J. J. Snider, Robert C. Carroll, Mrs. Ben Carroll, C. E. Clyatt. 

ERLANGER: Elizabeth^Crow, Mrs. W. F. Humphrey, C. C. Matheny, Mrs. Smith Crow, 
Mrs. E. T. McDade, Mrs. Rosa Everhart, Mrs. B. L. Homes, Mrs. Ellis Rodgers. 

FLOYD: Charles Young. 

GREENWOOD: Mrs. Walter Byerly, Mrs. Ethel Maley, Mrs. Jesse Miller, Mrs. Curtis 
Lackey, Mr. & Mrs. W. C. Parker, Mr. & Mrs. Wilbur Hilton, Mildred Lackey. 

HIGH ROCK MISSION: Mrs. W. L. Bradshaw, Mrs. C. A. Aycock, Mrs. Wade Barker, 
Mrs. Z. L. Morgan 

HOLLOWAYS: George C. Workman, G. C. Palmer. 

JERSEY: Mr. & Mre. I. A. Sharp, Mr. & Mrs. W. L. Roach, Mr. & Mrs. J. N. Penninger. 
LAKE VIEW: Mrs. Raymond Wilson, Mrs. B. H. West, Mrs. Paul Leonard, Floyd Gullett, 

H. P. Leonard. J. O. Dunn, B. H. West, Fay M. Wilson. 
LEXINGTON 1st: Rev. & Mrs. J. Roy Clifford, Miss Roxie Sheete, Mrs. P. M. Hendricks, 

Sam J. Smith, Mr. & Mrs. G. W. Miller, Mrs. E. L. Morgan, Mrs. L. A. Martin, Dot Loftin, 

Mr. & Mrs. O. F. Lee, Mrs. S. E. Miller, Mr. & Mrs. C. C. Wall. 
LIBERTY: V. Miller, Mr. & Mrs. J. Lacie Buie, Mrs. Clifford Lambeth, Mrs. Lacy Helpler, 

Clifford Lambeth. 

LICK CREEK: J. C. Reed, Mr. & Mrs. W. A. Jarvis, Katherine Feezor, Mrs. J. A. Kenney. 
MILLS HOME: Louise McMillan, Rev. & Mrs. J. O. Walton, Velva Taughtry, W. B. Lord, 

Mrs. Mary B. Davis, Dr. & Mrs. I. G. Greer, J. D. Fraley, W. P. Eddinger. 
MOUNTAIN VIEW: Charles S. Young, Mrs. Harris Wall, Lucy M. Carriek, J. M. Carrick, 

Mrs. Julie Carrick. 

NEW FRIENDSHSP: Mrs. G. C. Lewis, Mrs. Allen Parker, Mrs. Burton C. Swaim, Mrs. 
Farris Swaim, Mr. & Mrs. C. F. Motsinger, Rev. E. F. Baker. 



8 



Minutes of the 



OAK HILL MEMORIAL: Mrs. Richard Jarrett, Mrs. Dewey Wilson, Mrs. Brad Sechrist, 
Mrs. David Oldham. 

REEDS: Rev. & Mrs. N. C. Teague, Mrs. A. Oaver, Mrs. R. E. Hill, Mrs. G. F. Koontz. 

REID STREET: Mrs. Virgil Myers, Mr. & Mrs. R. L. Kiser. 

RICH FORK: Howard Parker, Hoyle F. Tate, Thelma Parker, T. H. Small. 

SHEETS MEMORIAL: D. W. Digh, R. P. Cassidy, J. W. Ryan, Mrs. Marvin Smith, Odis 
Frank, Mrs. Irving Cocper, Billy Parson, Edd Anderson. 

SMITH GROVE: Mrs. Hermon Grubb, Mrs. Grady Clement, Mrs. Roy C. Orrell. 

SOUTH SIDE: Mr. & Mrs. J. C. Creed, Mrs. J. K. Reeves, Mr. & Mrs. S. D. Baker. 

STONERS GROVE : Mrs. Raymond Monsees, Mrs. Fred Wafford, Mrs. Joe Long, Mr. & 
Mrs. C. C. Eddinger, Mr. & Mrs. O. L. Stoner, Mrs. H. R. Wafford, Mrs. L. E. LookabiO. 

SUMMERVILLE : Mrs. Shelton Surratfe, Mr3. Essie Davis, Mrs. Nina Daniel, Carl A. Talley, 
Mrs. A. E. Henderson, Mrs. Reuben Carrick, Mrs. Robbins Bean, Mrs. E. L. Newsom, Mrs. 
Luther Buie, Mrs. Henry Parker, Jr. Mrs. L. C, Carritk. 

THOMASVILLE 1st: J. A. Combs, G. A. Martin, F. A. Maier, Mrs. J. Leonard Ward, Mrs. 
R. S. Green, Mrs. R. G. Jennings, Rev. & Mrs. Chas. F. Leek. 

UNION GROVE: Mrs. Grace Huffman, Evie Huffman, Veola Evans, C. L. Evans, Mrs. 
Edna Hester, Mrs. Avery White. 

WALLBURG: Mrs. J. H. Sapp, Allen Bull, Dorthy Rothrock, Grace Cook, Louise Garrison, 
Earslie Hines, Mrs. C. Hines, B. E. King, Jimmy Wall, Peggy Welch, Elaine Garrison, O. H. 
Rothrock, Jacqueline Welch, Mrs. D. R. Yokeley, Mrs. J. F. Yokeley, Mrs. J. B, Clinard, 
Mrs. Ruth McGee, Mr. & Mrs. A. W. Clinard, Mrs. J. A Yokeley. Polly Swaim, Robert W. 
Clinard, Cleveland Wilkins, John Ben King, Rev. B. A. Mitchell, Mrs. O. H. Rothrock, J.H. 
Yokeley, Josephine Sink, Sarah King, Mr. & Mrs. Devoe Clinard, Betty King, Bib Yokeley, 
Ruth Yokeley, Helen Clinard. 

WALTERS GROVE: Mrs. David Surratt, Mrs. J. A. Galiimore, Mrs. John Yates Mrs. Paul 
Gallimore. 

WELCOME: W. W. Brinkley, W. H. Boner, E. S. Craver, O. M. Hartman, Mrs. C. S. Hay- 
nes, Mrs. Henry Wilkes. 

GLENNANNA MISSION: Mrs. G. W. McCasklll, Mrs. Roy Jarvis. 

VISITORS: Ruth Miller, Claude White, G. W. Bullard, M. H. Kendall, Guy E. Johnson, 
Martha Jane Mitchell, Nannie Phelps, Mrs. R. O. Hedrick, W. K. MoGee, Carlyle Cambbell, 
Claud F. Gaddy, L. Blanton, Mr. & Mrs. Grover H. Jones, Alma V. Clodfelter, Mrs. H. O. 
Miller, A. W. Feezor, J. W. Tuttle, Mr. & Mrs. Maskey M. Smith. 




Liberty Baptist Association 



9 



Proceedings 

Of the One Hundred and Fifteenth Annual Meeting 
Of the 

Liberty Baptist Association 

Tuesday and Wednesday, September 30 and October 1, 1947 
Held with 
Wallburg Baptist Church 
Wallburg, N. C. 
THEME— "MAGNIFYING OUR LOCAL CHURCHES" 

TUESDAY 

MORNING SESSION— SEPT. 30, 1947 

1. On Tuesday morning, Sept. 30, 1947, at 9:45 a. m., The Liberty 
Baptist Association assembled in its One Hundred and Fifteenth An- 
nual Session with the Wallburg Baptist Church, Wallburg, N. C. 

2. Rev. N. C. Teague, the Moderator, called the Body to order for 
the transaction of business. 

3. The opening Devotion was conducted by Rev. C. M. Oates, Pas- 
tor of Carolina Avenue Church. His Scripture lesson waa taken from 
2nd Timothy. The song service was led by Carey Davis, Director of 
Associational Music. Opening song, "Come Thou Almighty King." 

Report of Program Committee 

4. Rev. Chas. F. Leek read the report of the Program Committee. 
The report was adopted, subject to any change deemed advisable as 
the meeting proceeds. 

Tuesday Morning 



9:45 Devotional Rev. C. M. Oates 

10:00 Report of Program Committee Rev. Chas. F. Feek 

10:05 Roll Call and Appointment of Committees 
10:25 Reception of Petitonary Letters 

10:35 Report on Church Music . W. B. Lord 

10:50 Report and Address of the Deacons Grover H. Jones 

11:05 Report on the State of the Churches A. L. Snider 

11:25 Worship Period : Led by Carey Davis 

11:35 Annual Sermon , Rev. E. F. Baker 

Tuesday Afternoon 

"Focusing on Our State" 

1:30 Devotional Rev. D. M. Digh 

1:45 Report on Christian Education C. C. Wall 

1:50 Address, "Our State Baptist Colleges" Claude Gaddy 

2:05 Address, "Convention Program for Wake Forest"_Rev. Horace Easom 

2:25 Report on Training Union Miss Elizabeth Crow 

2:50 The Orphanage Rev. C. C. Eddinger 



10 



Minutes of the 



3:15 Report on State Missions Sherman B. Laws 

Address; _._M. A. Huggins, Sec. Baptist State Convention of N. C. 
4:00 Adjournment 

Wednesday Morning 
"Concentrating on Our Association" 



9:45 Devotional Rev O. M. Hartman 

10:00 Report on Sunday School Work Rev. E. F. Baker 

10:20 Report on Special Committees: 
Finances 



Naming those to Report in 1948 
Nominating Officers of the Association 
Reception of New Churches 
Resolutions 

Time, Place and Preacher 
10:50 Song Service 

10:55 Report of Committee on Asso. Missionary Rev. J. Roy Clifford 

11:10 The Baptist Hospital Rev. J. W. Dickens 

11:35 Report on Christian Literature Rev. Dave Oldham 

11:50 Report on Woman's Missionary Union Mrs. N. C. Teague 

12:15 Adjournment for Dinner 

Wednesday Afternoon 
"Looking Beyond Our Borders" 

1:30 Devotional Rev. S. D. Baker 

1:45 Report on Public Morals Rev. J. O. Walton 

Address, Dr. L. A. Martin, Executive Director, Allied League 

2:05 Report on Ministers Retirement Plan Dr. F. A. Maier 

2:15 Report on American Bible Society Rev. V. L. Andrews 

3:25 Report on Home Missions : Mrs. G. C. Lewis 

2:30 Miscellaneous Business 

2:45 Report on Radio and Baptist Hour Rev. R. L. Kiser 

2:55 Report on Foreign Missions Rev. E. C. Roach 

3:00 Address on World Conditions and World Baptist Alliance 

By Rev. Julian Hopkins, High Point 

3:45 Final Adjournment 

5. Roll call was made by Clerk, A. L. Snider. Two Churches were 
not represented at roll call. 

6. Appointment of Committees was read at this time. 

Report on Church Music 

7. This report was prepared and presented Bro. W. B. Lord of Mills 
Home Church. The report was adopted. 

The test of any people is whether or not they are able to sense the 
trends of their present in the bearing of these trends on their future destiny, 
and if they are willing to change for the better any course which they are 
following about which there may be;reasonable question or doubt. No gen- 
eration can cope with the problems of its day unless it is true to the moral 
standards upon which real progress must be based. This applies to church 
music as well as to international affairs and the like. 

There are a number of religious organizations who have never used any 
type of music except hymns and anthems that have stood the test through 
the ages in spiritual values. 

Christianity and religion go hand in hand with good church music. 
The type of preaching is always on a level with the type of music used in 
the church, whether used by the choir or permitted to be used by the church 
from any outside group. Church music will rise step by step with the 
musical education of the pastor and the people. Every church choir is 



Liberty Baptist Association 



11 



handicapped if the pastor does not recognize and appreciate good music 
and if the congregation does not require the same. 

There is too much emotional singing which tends toward hoiy-rollerism 
in some of our churches. This is probably due to limited musical education of 
the church leaders. No church musically or otherwise will ever rise higher 
than its leadership is willing to set the standards. 

There are three types of music that appeal to men: to the mind, the 
classical; to the heart, the sacred; and to the feet and lower emotions, such 
as a type of modern jazz or "boogie-woogie" music alarmingly on the in- 
crease in some of our churches. 

There must be in music as in many other things a vast differance be- 
tween the world's jazz and the music of the churches. 

Let us give more attention to our churches who claim to be Baptist but 
are bordering mostly on an emotional religion. 

Addison concurs in the high recognition of the value of good music in 
religious education: 

It wakes the soul, and lifts it high 

And wings it with sublime desires 

And fits it to bespeak the Deity. 
We therefore recommend that our churches first, examine their music 
programs in the light of the judgment of those who are qualified to advise 
them in this matter; second, that our churches seek to organize a graded 
Christian singing program of the highest type for all ages under their in- 
fluence; and third, that our churches replace any and all song books that 
may be delapidated with fresh new copies and all song books of the jazz 
type with approved hymn books which include both strong Christian mes- 
sages and strong Christian music. 

And this leads us to observe in conclusion; that the production of hymn 
books and song books must be put on a different basis from the present. 
The wise man who wrote the book of Ecclesiastes under the direction of the 
Spirit of God was correct when he listed among the vanity of vanities the 
"making of many books." If that were true back in his day, how much 
more is it true today. And if it is true regarding other books, how much 
more is it true concerning the production of hymn and song books. We 
might very well paraphrase on Ecclesiastes 12:12 as follows: "Of making 
many song books there is no end; and much singing of many of their songs 
is a weariness of the soul." We offer therefore as of paramount importance, 
the preparation by a most qualified and representative cross-section of our 
Baptist hosts, of a series of graded and co-ordinated hymn books for grades 
from beginners department thru the worship service. If we are to preserve 
a noble grade of church music and save our churches from the shallow ef- 
fects of shallow songs, we must bring our boys and girls and youths up 
through approved church music programs and participation. 

Respectfully submitted, 
W. B. Lord 

8. A Song, "My Faith Looks Up to Thee." 

9. New pastors present introduced, and all visitors were recognized 
at this time. 

10. An address was brought at this time by Bro. Grover H. Jones 
of High Point. Subject, "The Deacon, and how he may best Serve 
His Church." This was a very interesting and helpful message to all 
who heard it. 



12 



Minutes of the 



Report on State of Churches 

11. This report was prepared and brought by A. L. Snider, Clerk 
of the Association from Denton Church. The report was adopted. 

The report sent in by the Churches this year indicate a very success- 
ful year This report, though not complete in all phases of our work, will 
give a general idea of the progress made the past year by the Churches and 
various organizations. 

There are 16 Churches which have no B. T. U. 

Enrolled in B. T.U., 1,224; a loss of 83 from last year and 5 Churches 
less with Training Unions than reported last year. 

W. M. U. has 114 organizations against 113 last year, with a gain in 
membership of 91 members. Our women gave this year $13,839.46, a gain 
of $3,211.98 over last year's report. 

The Sunday School had a gain of 375 in enrollment with an average at- 
tendance of only 51 more. 15 Churches have an enrollment in Sunday 
School of more than their church membership. 19 Churches do not have 
as many enrolled in Sunday School as they report Church members 

Of our Churches, 18 have preaching every Sunday. Two Churches re- 
ported no revival last year. Three Churches reported no baptisms. One 
Church reported no additions. Nineteen Churches reported mid-week 
prayer service, and fifteen no mid-week prayer service. 

Our Churches had 323 baptisms and 214 other additions— making a gain 
of 537. We had a total in losses of 333 making a net gain of 204. Only one 
Church gave more for missions than for local work. This was Mills Home. 

Gifts for Local Causes $154,114.84 gain of $12,483.12 

" " Missions 46,039.30- gain of 1,917.88 

" " Orphanage 9,322.47 ..loss of 722.19 

Total Gifts $200,154.14. ___Total Gain_$14,515.08 

We have a total of only 8 Churches that sent in the 50 Associational 
expense fund. Four Churches sent from 2 to 2]^^ per member for Associa- 
tional expenses. Four Churches sent in about 2^4^ per member for Asso- 
ciational expenses while the remaining 18 sent in about 40 per member. 

While we have made gains in most all financial causes, our gains in 
winning people for Christ has been very limited. 

In this, our Liberty Association, according to the letters sent in it has 
taken, on the average, two hundred persons to win five people to Christ. 

Should not this be a challenge for each of us to wake up and do some- 
thing toward winning souls to Christ. 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. L. Snider 

12. Worship period. Music led by Bro. Carey Davis and furnished 
by Wallburg and Abbotts Creek Choirs. 

13. The Annual Sermon was brought by Bro. E. F. Baker, Pastor of 
New Friendship Church. Also the congregation sang, "There is a 
Fountain Filled With Blood." Scripture used as basis for message 
was Acts 2:1-11, read by Rev. Chas. Leek of Thomasville Church. 
Subject used was "Penticost" for the basis of the message of the hour. 

Adjournment for noon hour at 12:15 p. m., to reassemble at 1:15. 



Liberty Baptist Association 



13 



TUESDAY AFTERNOON 

14. Meeting opened by singing "Amazing Grace/* The Devotional 
was led by Rev. D. W. Digh, Pastor Sheets Memorial Church. The Sub- 
ject was "Faith" and the Scripture was taken from Hebrews. 

15. Dr. Horace Easom, of Shelby, and Dr. Carlyle Campbell, of 
Meredith College, were visitors and were recognized at this time. 

16. The report on the reception of new Churches was made at this 
time, by Chairman of the Committee, E. C. Roach, Pastor of Denton 
Church. Greenwood and Lake View Churches were accepted into the 
Association and the Right Hand of welcome extended to them at 
this time 

Report on Christian Education 

17. This report was prepared and presented by C. C. Wall, of Lex- 
ington 1st Church. It was discussed by Claud Gaddy of Raleigh, Dr. 
Sanky Blanton, and Dr. Carlyle Campbell, President of Meredith Col- 
lege, Raleigh. The report was adopted. 

Christian Education is a real challenge to our Baptist Denomination 
and must be emphasized, encouraged, strengthened and adequately sup- 
ported. Four years after the North Carolina Baptist State Convention was 
organized, our forefathers had the wisdom and courage to establish our first 
school — Wake Forest College, which has now been in existance around 114 
years. Down thru the years we have experienced many dark days, and at 
times it appeared we would have to close the doors of many of our schools, 
but we are thankful this did not happen. 

When Wake Forest College was first organized it was with the idea of 
preparing our ministers, but it was not long until this viewpoint was changed 
and all of our Baptist schools in the State have been established not only 
for the training of our ministers and workers, but for all our boys and girls, 
in order that we may be able to give them a Christian Education so that 
when they return from schools they may assume the proper Christian 
leadership in their Church and community. 

For the past 25 years we have made greater progress than possibly dur- 
ing the past 75 years, in seeing to it that our two senior colleges, Wake 
Forest and Meredith, as well as our junior colleges, Mars Hill; Gardner- 
Webb; Wingate and Campbell are recognized as outstanding Christian 
schools of our State, and these schools are paying rich dividends. 

Our Baptist Churches over the State have a great privilege and chal- 
lenge to raise the sum of $1,500,000 in the next three years for Wake Forest 
College. The suggested amount for our Liberty Association is $50,000. 
It is very encouraging the way our Churches over the Association are re- 
sponding to their suggested proportionate part of this amount. We are sure 
with the Lord's guidance our Association will not fall short and will rise 
the amount suggested. 

Our pastors should emphasize and encourage our boys and girls, when- 
ever possible, to attend one of our denominational schools. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. C. WaU 

18. Song, "At the Cross." 

19. On motion, Rev. J. Roy Clifford of First Church, Lexington, 
brought to us our goal in the Liberty Association for Wake Forest 
College removal Campaign. 



u 



Minutes of the 



Report on Baptist Hospital 

20. This report was prepared and brought by Rev. J. W. Dickens, 
Pastor of Center Hill and Smiths Grove Churches. 

The North Carolina Baptist Hospital was incorporated in 1922 and. re- 
ceived its first patient May 28, 1923. First planned as a 100 bed institution, 
it was enlarged in 1942 to a capacity of 247 beds and 55 bassinets. The 
Out-Patient building was opened July 1, 1946. 

The underlying purpose of the Baptist Hospital has always been medical 
care for the poor. Since the day it received its first patient it has offered a high 
type of hospital care on a state- wide basis. This caliber of service has been 
enhanced by the establishment of Wake Forest Medical School located ad- 
jacent to the Hospital. When the Baptist Hospital became a teaching hos- 
pital, its purpose became twofold — teaching and healing, the twin 
endeavors of Christ. 

Our Out-Patient Diagnostic Clinics: Because the hospital had access to 
the doctors in the medical school, and because it had tremendous invest- 
ments in laboratory and X-ray facilities, it was decided to enlarge the ser- 
vice beyond the limited number of in-patients it could care for. It could 
take from all over the State those who could not be admitted to the hos- 
pital. These clinics are operated for those patients who are not able to pay 
a specialist's fee, and the only charge made is a $5.00 registration plus re- 
duced charges for special X-ray and laboratory work. During 1946 the hos- 
pital gave exhaustive diognostic examinations to more than 18,000 patients. 
In many cases when the diagnosis has been made, many of these patients 
return to their homes and are treated by their local doctors. Therefore this 
department is very helpful to the doctors throughout the State. July 1, 
1946 the Hospital opened a $250,000 out-patient building to accommodate 
the increased demands for these services. 

Medical School: As referred to above, in 1941 the Wake Forest Medi- 
cal School was expanded from a two year school into a fully approved four 
year medical school This school was moved to Winston-Salem and a 
modern building constructed adjacent to the hospital. This expansion of 
the medical school was made possible through the generosity of the heirs of 
the late Mr. Bowman Gray. The combination of the Baptist owned hos- 
pital-medical school is the only combination in the United States, and for 
that reason is the only hospital-medical school for the training of medical 
missionaries 

School of Nursing: The Baptist Hospital operates a fully approved 
school of nursing and at present has an enrollment of about 120 young 
ladies receiving training under Christian auspices. These students are select- 
ed under very high standards. They come from all over North Carolina, 
and represent the highest type of momanhocd— mentally, physically, and 
morally. These students are not only given scientific training, but the 
hospital seek to develop the Christian and humane attitudes in these girls. 
Their course of study includes Bible taught by the Chaplain, and religious 
exercises are held in the Nurses' Home. We recommend this School most 
highly to all young women who are interested in a nursing career. 

Other Schools of the Hospital: The Hospital also operates a School of 
Graduate Dietetics for the training of hospital dietitians, a School of Lab- 
oratory' Technology, a School of Anesthesia, and a School of X-ray Tech- 
nology. To many who are interested in the hospital the educational work 
done by the hospital is considered a great service. 



Liberty Baptist Association 



15 



Number of Patients: The hospital is able to admit yearly approxmately 
8,000 in as bed patients. In addition the out-patient facilities accommodate 
about 20,000 who are given complete diagnostic examinations and are not 
admitted as bed patients. Also the medical school operates a private clinic 
for those who are able to pay for this service, and this clinic examines about 
20,000 patients each year. Altogather this totals 48,000 people who depend 
each year upon the Baptist Hospital for relief from pain. 

Charity Work: Of the 8,000 patients who are admitted each year as 
bed patients, slightly over half are service patients who pay no doctor's fee 
and who pay reduced hopital expenses. During 1946 many of these patients 
paid absolutely nothing toward their hospital bill. It is toward the expen- 
ses of these patients that our Mother's Day offering each year is used. The 
cost to the hospital of free service during 1946 was $159,115.47 This was 
made possible through Baptist contributions, the Duke Endowment which 
gave $17,000, various individuals and welfare agencies, the earnings from 
the soda shop and other avenues. Our hospital was the largest dispenser 
of charity medical care in 1946 of any otJ^er denominationally controlled 
hospital in the South. 

Spiritual Atmosphere of the Hospital: The religious program of the hos- 
pital is under the direction of a full time director, Dr. W. K. McGee, a 
chaplain, Rev. Richard Young, and a student secretary, Miss Edith Arring- 
ton. These workers teach Bible and promote religious programs for the 
students, visit and council with patients, keep in contact with relatives of 
the patients and minister to the bereaved. Due to this close touch with 
the patients, these workers have many rededications and conversions. 

North Carolina Baptists have voted to enlarge our Hospital. Interes- 
ted friends are ready to help in this. Now we are looking forward to a much 
larger and more modern plant on the beautiful 100-acre Gray estate in 
Winston-Salem where this ministry of healing in Christ's name can be multi- 
plied. Surely, all the Baptists in North Carolina will rally to the support 
of this institution which is doing such a wonderful service to the sick of 
our State in the name of our Christ. 

Respectfully Submitted, 
J. W. Dickens 

Report on Mills Home 

21. This report was prepared and presented by Bro. C. C. Eddinger, 
Pastor of Stoners Grove, Holloways and Jersey Churches. It was dis- 
cussed by I. G. Greer, Superintendent, and J. D. Fraley, Treasurer of 
Mills Home. The report was adoped. 

There are certain reasons why orphanages and other child caring agen- 
cies are necessary. Among these are poverty, poor health, illiteracy, and 
instability in the home. 

The Baptist Orphanage was founded for the purpose of caring for orphan 
children and yet one of the chief concerns of welfare agencies of the pres- 
ent time is the wrecked home. There are over 1,000 children in the orphan- 
ages of North Carolina who have both parents living. 

The chief function of the home is to bring children into the world and 
rear them. No other institution in all Christian civilization has a legal 
moral right to bring children into the world. In all our progress no substi- 
tute has yet been found for a Christian home. 

The Baptist Orphanage has rarely ever been able to accept all the 



16 



Minutes of the 



children for whom application have been made and yet it has probably been 
too much on the receiving end of the line. A great surgeon does not oper- 
ate until he has made a thorough diagnosis. Institutions should analyze 
and get the back-ground of each case before a child is admitted. Provid- 
ing food, clothing and shelter is not the full answer. Many children for 
whom applications are made should never come to the orphanage. Peter 
at the Gate Beautiful would have done the begger grave injustice if he had 
given him money. Instead he said: "Silver and gold have I none; but such 
as I have give I thee: in the name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth rise up and 
walk." 

We believe that one of the greatest services the orphanage can render 
is to make it possible for parents and children to help themselves. In ad- 
dition to the service we are rendering children in the orphanage, we should 
help to preserve and improve homes that are in danger of breaking down. 
Last year the orphanage, through its case work helped to make adjustments 
for more than 400 children where application had been made to enter the 
orphanage. Perhaps this was one of the best services the orphanage rendered. 

In order to care for more children during these days when it is so ex- 
pensive to build, the orphanage authorities are developing a program of board- 
ing home care. This enables them to place children in good homes under 
the supervision of the orphanage and thus give many children the privilege 
of having a good home without placing them in the institution. 

Last year the orphanage cared for 700 children; 60 of these were cared 
for in boarding homes and 50 by Mothers Aid. Case work service was made 
available to 1,107 children. This was made possible through the loyalty of 
the Baptist denomination and other friends who month by month and at 
Thanksgiving time give to the support of these children in keeping 
with the will of the Master. Year after year we are more conscious 
that the method of supporting the orphanage through once a month 
and Thanksgiving offering is a wise Christian policy. In addition to cash 
offerings, the orphanage at all times can use canned goods and other com- 
modities needed for the daily support of a large family. 

Once more we pledge our support to this institution that is dedicated 
to the one task of making strong, clean, Christian men and women out of 
our boys and girls under our care. 

22. Song "When I Survey the Wondrous Cross." 

Report on State Missions 

23. This report was not read but was to be presented at a later 
date. This report follows: 

Once more let it be reaffirmed that Missionary Baptists in North Car- 
olina in 1947 are what they are because during the years they have pursued 
a fairly aggressive STATE MISSION PROGRAM. There is scarcely a 
church in the State that has not been aided directly or indirectly by State 
Missions. In some instances it has been through the support of the pastor, 
in others, aid on the building or the purchase of the lot. Moreover, State 
Missions has been an indirect aid to the colleges and to our benevolent 
institutions. For example, the General Board of the Convention is now ex- 
pending on missionary pastor's salaries some $35,000 a year. These churches 
will in return give about tnat amount to the objects supported by the Con- 
vention; only a small part of what they give goes into State Mission funds. 

As the years have passed State Missions has, from time to time assum- 



Liberty Baptist Association 



17 



ed new activities. At the present time much attention is being given to the 
training of ministers already in service, far more than heretofore; the 
Department of Visual Education is being added, and much attention is be- 
ing given to the developing of our rural churches. Lots in strategic places 
are being purchased and country churches are being stimulated to relocate 
when such a move appears advisable for the growth of the church. All in all 
there are about a dozen activities in which State Missions now has a part, 
all designed to aid in the building of a Christian commonwealth. 

The present budget for State Missions is about $225,000. There is ur- 
gent need for an adtional $100,000 each year. We rejoice to applaud the 
increased interest on the part of the W. M. U. in the State Mission task. 
Last year the offering was larger than heretofore, and it is earnestly hoped 
that in 1947 the women will give the larger part of the $100,000 yet needed. 

For more than a century the Convention's program of State Missions 
has given attention to the training of ministers. Until fairly recently such 
training has been thought of in terms of those who go to college or semin- 
ary. Now, attention has been given to those men who have been unable 
to go either to college or seminary. Some 18 years ago the program for the 
training of ministers was enlarged by providing for a school in summer at 
Wake Forest and Meredith Colleges. These schools last about 10 days. 

About 12 years ago a school of one week was begun at Mars Hill. At 
this time the program of one week schools in summer are held at Wake 
Forest, Mars Hill, Gardner- Webb and Wingate. Besides these summer 
schools which stimulate the desire for futher training, some associations, 
singly or in combination continue this program in the winter and spring. 
Altogether these one week schools reach upward of 1,000. 

Beginning 1946 there was held at Boone the first school operating for 
six weeks under the leadership of J. C. Canipe. Many of the ministers com- 
ingirom 100 miles away yet returning home each week-end to serve their 
church. The Fruitland property, near Hendersonville, and now owned by 
the Convention, is being conditioned for use in this teaching program. 

Thus it will be seen that the Convention's program for the training of 
the ministry includes not only those men who are in college or seminary 
but those already in service. Perhaps the Board is making no better ex- 
penditure of State Mission money. 

Bro. M. A. Huggins, State Secretary, spoke on State Missions and 
the great need of Europe and our Denomination at home. 

Adjourned at 4:05 to meet back Wedneday. Benediction by Bro. 
Miller, of Hilliard Memoral Church, High Point. 

SECOND DAY — Wednesday Morning 

24. Mr. Carey Davis was in charge of the Devotional Song Service. 
The song used was "Sweet Hour of Prayer." Rev. O. M. Hartman, 
Pastor of Welcome Church conducted the morning Devotional, use- 
ing as his subject, "Prayer." 

Report on Sunday School 

25. This report was prepared and brought by Rev. E. F. Baker, 
Pastor New Friendship Church. The report was adopted. It was dis- 
cussed by Mr. Baker. 

During the past year the Liberty Association has had no Associational 
Sunday School Organization. However, at the request of the Executive 
Committee, Brother B. A. Mitchell assumed the responsibilities of promot- 



18 



Minutes of the 



ing the Sunday School work among the churches for the remainder of the 
Aasociational Year, with the understanding that such an organization 
would be perfected at this session of the Association. He reports the fol- 
lowing activities during the past year. 

1. Three meetings held in preparation for laying the Southern Baptist 
Sunday School Program for 1947 before every church in the Association. 

2. Organized seven teams, of three members each, to visit every church. 
Each team functioned, and reports were received from all but four churches, 
which churches did not receive the visiting workers. 

3. Two meetings held for planning for a training school for Vacation 
Bible School workers. 

4. The Vacation Bible Training School, organized under the direction of 
Mrs. H. C. Hobbs, was held at Mills Home Church May 20, and offered 
one day of training for the complete organization, including the general and 
department workers. Representatives from 20 churches attended that one 
day training. However, only six churches reported their Schools to Mr. 
Mitchell. There were doubtless others that failed to get their report in. 

The benefits and possibilities of Sunday School work has ben pro- 
claimed and demonstrated until little or no doubt has been left in the 
minds of Southern Baptists as to its worth. Surely we have no other agency 
that contributes as much toward evangelism, dissemination of information 
concerning our changing programs, enlistment through visitation, in- 
creased church attendance, inculcating of the doctrines of our faith, instill- 
ing of reverence in worship and godliness in living, arousing the interest 
and participation in our missionary enterprise and a clearer understanding 
of the "Message of the Book." This varied ministry of the Sunday School 
can be realized in any church regardless of size or location; and no pastor 
or church can afford to be witeout it. 

"We recommend the completion of the associational organization a^this 
session of the Association; the early securing of an Associational Missionary. 
That the two working together, may promote the Sunday School work 
generally, and enlarge its usefulness in the local churches. 

Respectfully submitted, 

E. F. Baker 

Report of Nominating Committee for Aeso. Sunday School Officers'. 



Associational Supt. J. D. Fraley, Mills Home 

Assistant Supt. Clay Vann Teague, Wallburg 

Secretary-Treasurer Sam Smith, Lexington 

Chorister Rex Sprinkle, New Friendship 

Pianist Wanna Fay Laws, Thomasville 1st 



The committe recommends that the General Officers with the Moderator 
and chairman of the nominating committe select the departmental officers. 

Respectfully, 
E. F. Baker, Chm., C. C. Wall, V. L. Andrews 
26. Treasurer's Report, 1947 



Balance in Treasury Sept. 1, 1946 $ 41.21 

Minute Fund paid in last year 302.97 

Special Collection 46.51 

Minute Fund sent in Nov. 1946 by Liberty Church 1.96 

$392.65 

Disbursements 

Printing Minutes (1.C00) $175.00 

Guest Speaker, Dr. J. Clyde Turner 10.00 



Liberty Baptist Association 



19 



Promotion Executive Committee 3.00 

, A. A. Walker, prospective Asso. Missionary expense ___ 7.50 

Printing Programs, etc. 8.25 

Paper for Statistical sheets 2.00 

Postage 10.09 

Typing. 12.00 

Clerk-Treasurer ___, 75.00 

Total Disbursements .$302.84 

Balance in Treasury Sept. 1947 89.81 

Respectfully submitted, , $392.65 
A. L. Snider 

27. Report of Committee to Name Persons 

To Bring Reports Next Year 

Christian Literature . ______Rev. B. A. Mitchell 

Baptist Hospital Dr. David C. Smith 

State Missions ;____ _G. W. Miller 

Home Missions _Miss Katherine Feezor 

Foreign Missions ; ___Rev. C. M. Oates 

Christian Education _i_; __Rev. J. Roy Clifford 

Relief and Annuity Dan S. Hay worth 

Orphanage „ , Rev. J. 0. Walton 

Music :_: : Carey Davis 

Public Morals Rev. E. F. Baker 

American Bible Society '_ Miss Roxie Sheets 

Sunday Schools Odis Frank 

Training Union Miss Dorthy Loftin 

W..M. U __Mrs. V. L. Andrews 

State of Churches A. L. Snider 

Sam J. Smith, Chm., Mrs. Lacy E. Hepler 
J. O. Walton, Floyd Lookabill 

28. Committee Report on Resolutions 

We, of the Liberty Baptist Association, wish to extend to the Wallburg 
Baptist Church deep gratitude for the fine hospitality displayed in the cor- 
dial welcome extended, and the abundant and delicious meals. Thanks to 
its able Pastor and noble women of the Church. 

We also express our appreciation to the Moderator and Clerk of the 
Association for the efficient manner in which they planned and carried on 
the work of this Association. 

Respectfully Submitted, 
David Oldham, Chm., Carl A. Talley 

29. Rev. Charles F. Leek of Thomasville 1st Church, brought a 
recommendation as to change of alphabetical order of Churches, 
grouping all Churches in Lexington, under Lexington; all Churches 
in Thomasville under Thomasville. After much discussion, the mat- 
ter was voted to be made effective as of our Associational year 1948. 

30. Song "All Hail the Power of Jesus Name." 

31. Report of Associational Missionary was made by Bro. J. Roy 
Clifford, Pastor 1st Church, Lexington. No written report for this. 

32. Time, Place and Preacher 

Your Committee on Time, Place and Preacher recommends as follows: 
TIME— Tuesday and Wednesday after 4th Sunday in September, 1948. 
PLACE— Smith Grove Baptist Church, Rt. 1, Linwood. 
PREACHER— Rev. Chas. F. Leek, Pastor 1st Church, Thomasville. 
ALTERNATE— Rev. J. O. Walton, Pastor Mills Home Church. 
Respectfully submitted, 
J. W. Dickens Chm. 



20 



Minutes of the 



33. Committee on Finance 

(1) We desire to praise our Clerk for the business-like manner in which 
he handled the finances of the Association during the past year and to 
commend him for the splendid Minutes of last years meeting. 

(2) Due to the increased expenses in printing and material; and from 
the fact it is estimated we will need 100 more copies of the Minutes this 
year; we therefore recommend that each Church pay at least 5j£ per total 
membership. 

C. F. Moteinger, Chm., Victor L. Andrews 
G. W. Miller, W. L. Roach 

Election of Officers 

34. Report on Nomination of Officers for year of 1947-1948. The 
following were unanimously elected. 

Moderator N. C. Teague 

Vice Moderator J. O. Walton 

Clerk-Treasurer A. L. Snider 

Asso. S. S. Supt J. D. Fraley 

Asso. B. T. U. Director J. H. Honeycutt 

Song Leader Carey Davis 

Pianist Miss Shirley Davis 

Orphanage Representative C. C. Wall 

Chm. Promotion-Exeeutive Committee E. F. Baker 

Recorder Representative Miss Dorcas Clinard 

Executive j N. C. Teague, A. L. Snider, E. F. Baker, C. F. Leek, 
Committee ( W. H. Lomax, C. C. Matheny, C. V. Teague. 

Signed: M. 0. Hartman, C. J. Davis, G. C. Palmer, 
Mrs. R. S. Green, J. R. Clifford. 

Report on B. T. U. 

35. This report was prepared and presented by Miss Elizabeth Crow, 
of Erlanger Church. The report was discussed by Miss Miller and 
Miss Mitchell of Raleigh. 

The goal we have been striving to reach in the past year's work in the 
Liberty Association Training Union are as follows: 

(1) Organize new Training Unions; (2) Promote better programs; (3) Pro- 
motion of study courses; (4) To make the Bible the center of everyday life. 

During the year Thomasville 1st has organized a Training Union at 
Greenwood and Churchland. Center Hill organized one at Smith Grove. 
There have been reports sent in during the year to the Director of B.T.U.'s 
functioning in 18 of our Churches with a total of 96 Unions, including 16 
Adult, 15 Young People, 23 Intermediate, 24 Junior Unions and 18 Story 
Hour groups. 

On March 30, at Center Hill Church, the elimination contest was held 
with the following contestants as winners: 

Junior Memory Work Drill— James Garris, Harry Smith, Peggy Malloy, 
Paul Garrison, Maruorie Carroll, and Hattie Putnam from Mills 
Home, and Betty Stranger, 1st Church, Lexington. 

Intermediate Sword Drill— Rullah Nell Beck of Sheets Memorial. 

Better Speakers Tourament— Ruby Hall, Thomasville 1st. 

Adult Scripture Reading— Miss Hazel Grady, Lexington 1st 

The winners of this meeting participated in the regional contest held 
May 16-17 at Ashboro Street Church, in Greensboro, with all the Juniors 
winning. These participated in the State contest at Ridgecrest with four 



Liberty Baptist Association 



21 



winning there. The Hymn Festival was also held with the Mills Home 
Girls Choir going to Rid gecrest. 

December 6, at Erlanger Church we observed South-wide Simultanous 
Associational Night with an attendance of 208. "The Challenge of 1947" 
was given by the Associational Officers, and an address by Dr I. G. Greer. 

Executive Committee, and Officers and Leaders meetings were held and 
well attended. Very helpful and inspiring programs were presented 
throughout the year. The Association is A-l. 
36. List of B. T. U. Officers. 



Director J. H. Honeycutt, Mills Home 

Asst. Director Mrs. Kepler, Churchland 

Pastor Advisor Rev. Digh, Sheets Memorial 

Chorister . Miss Loftin, Lexington 1st 

Pianist Mrs. Mock Hedrick, Erlanger 

Group Directors Rev. Andrews, Churchland 

Mrs. Ngal Yarbrough, Center Hill 
Wilson Culp, Ried Street 

Adult M. F. Brown, New Friendship 

Young People Gene Smith, Oak Hill Memorial 

Intermediate Miss Troy Garrett, Center Hill 

Junior Miss Velva Daughtery, Mills Home 

Story Hour Mrs. King, Wallburg 



Respectfully, 
Elizabeth Crow 

37. Song, led by Carey Davis, of Abbotts Creek Church. 

Report on Christian Literature 

38. This report was prepared and brought by Bro. Dave Oldham, 
Pastor of Greenwood and Oak Hill Churches. 

Baptists have compelling reasons for giving major attention to religious 
literature. We believe in personal responsibility and voluntary action. This 
makes imperative spiritual knowledge, an enlightened conscience, moral 
convictions, and intellegent comprehension of the issues of our times. Again, 
we are inevitably involved in a raging war, the war of ideas. There is cease- 
less struggle between the ideas of totalitarianism and democracy, extreme 
nationalism and sane internationalism, militaristic domination and harmon- 
ious co-operation, secularism and spiritual values, indulgence and self con- 
trol, formalism and faith, works and grace, the kingdom of Satan and the 
kingdom of Christ, 

The printed page is the chief medium of this warfare of ideas. And the 
welfare of humanity depends on the ideas which control the world. Finally, 
the forces of evil are exploiting the field of literature with ingenious, organ- 
ized, and concentrated power. The antidote for this peril is the propaga- 
tion of truth, the truth of Christianity. Baptists must awake to the urgent 
values of religious literature in the fulfilment of their mission. 

The Sunday School Board publishes 60 periodicals. They are designed 
to encourage Bible study, to lead to personal faith in Christ, to cultivate 
Christian character and consecration, to develop faithful workers and skill- 
ful leaders in our churches, and to motivate worthy participation in the 
cause of world redemption. The combined circulation of these peroidicals 
in 1946 was 28,986,851. 

Our literature reflects a position, namely: that the Bible is an inspired 
revelation of God which is designed to bring about the spiritual redemption 
of individuals and righteousness in every area of the personal and social 



22 



Minutes of the 



living of the redeemed. The Bible is accepted as God's supernatural and 
authoritative Word, an adequate guide for the life of man. 

Again, our literature is dedicated to a high purpose. The first aim is the 
exposition of great Bible doctrines and instruction in righteousness. To this 
end major emphasis is given to the following great doctrines of the gospel: 
God is personal, infinite, holy, righteous, friendly and approachable; Christ 
is the divine Redeemer and living Lord; the Bible is the authoritative guide 
for the moral and spiritual life of man; sin is universal and its ultimate con- 
sequence is eternal death; crucifixion of Christ is the only atonement for 
sin; personal regeneration through faith in Christ is imperative to entrance 
into the Kingdom of God; holiness of character is the imperative obligation 
of the Christian; the attitudes of the Christian toward people must conform 
to the mind and spirit of Christ; the church is a divine institution, com- 
posed of regenerated people, and commissioned to carry on all that Jesus 
began both to do and to teach; Christian missions is the supreme task of 
every church, and winning the lost should be the supreme undertaking of 
every Christian; life is a sacred stewardship and the Christian's living and 
serving aught to represent his maximum capacity for growth and usefulness. 

The second aim is the interpretation or evaluation of Bible truth as it 
relates to life now. The Bible is the Book for all the ages. Our literature 
seeks to interpret its message for the world. Sin appears in different forms 
today. Faith must overcome new obstacles. New dicoveries of knowledge 
must be related to eternal truth. To love one's neighbor must express it- 
self through new channels. The church must render its ministry to a chang- 
ing world. The kingdom of God faces new opposition and its citizens must 
apply its principles to a changing social order. 

The third aim is to give guidance in the methods and skills of Christian 
witnessing and work. To this end our promotional literature is dedicated. 
Kingdom workers must not only know the truth, they must be skilled in 
presenting the truth to others. They must not only appreciate the mission 
of the church, they must know how to build churches. They must not only 
believe in Christ as the one way of salvation, they must be skilled in lead- 
ing others to believe in him. It is not enough to be willing to die for Christ; 
Christians must know how to work for Him. 

The fourth aim is to give conviction and inspiration, motive and dy- 
namic, for faithful service in Christ's name. Our people must be stirred to 
action. All the forces of evil combine to dissipate spiritual conviction and 
purpose. Personal obligations of every sort tend to monopolize energy and 
effort. Timidity, laziness and inefficiency undermine the Christian's service. 
Hence our literature seeks to persuade, to convince, to arouse, to impel our 
people with reference to the life and death issues of the kingeom of God. 

To sumarize, the purpose of our literature is to present Christ in the 
breadth, radiance, magnetism, and majesty of his divine personality; to 
lead our people to know the truth, practice the truth, propagate the truth; 
and to meet the needs of the people in the churches, all the needs so far as 
literature is concerned, so that together we may work for the fulfilment of 
Christ's kingdom on the earth. 

Respectfully submitted, 

David Oldham 

39. Claud White, representing Campbell College, was recognized 
at this time. 

40. Bro. Kendall of Mars Hill College was recognized at this time. 



Liberty Baptist Association 



28 



Report on W. M. U. 

41. This report was prepared and presented by Mrs. N. C. Teague, 
of Reeds Church. 

This report was discussed by Mrs. P. M. Hendrix, of 1st Church, 
Lexington. The report was adopted. 

As Southern Baptists have launched well into their second century, 
Woman's Missionary Union feels more keenly than ever the challenges and 
opportunities that come its way. 

It is a far cry since the day nearly 60 years ago that a band of conse- 
crated women organized Woman's Missionary Union. The voice that then 
was just beginning to be heard, is now heard wherever the gospel has been 
proclaimed. The W. M. U., through its definitely mission training for the 
youth of our churches, through its maintainance of the Training School for 
young women, has seen consecrated men and women go to every nation 
that has opened its doors to the gospel. Working as "Laborers together 
with God" Woman's Missionary Union through the years has sought to 
carry out the Great Commission "Go ye." 

Liberty Association W. M. U. rejoices that it has played a vital part 
in the "Furtherance of the Gospel" through prayer, gifts, mission study, 
and community missions. 

It was a distinct loss to us that Mrs. C. B. Atkinson tendered her 
resignation as Superintendent, due to moving out of the state where her 
husband accepted a new pastorate. The clearly defined Christian character 
of Mr. and Mrs. Atkinson was an inspiration to each of us, and we feel the 
richer for having experienced the joy of Christian fellowship with them. 

When Mrs. Atkinson gave up the work, Mrs. P. M. Hendrix, our Asso- 
ciate Superintendent ably took ever the task and in April at our Annual 
Meeting we were happy to elect her our Superintendent. 

Reports for 1946 reveal an effective year of work — some of the high- 
lights being, the Mission Study Institute in February, Young People's Rally, 
one day camp for Juniors, G. A. and R. A's, in July, New Friendship, a 
fully graded A-l Union for the 13th consecutive year, Churchland, Liberty 
and Mills Home receiving a missionary gift from every resident woman 
member of their churches. 



The 1946 gifts to special offerings were: 

State Mission Offering $ 870.28 

Annie Armstrong Home Mission Offering 843.60 

Heck-Jones Memorial Offering 403.72 

Lottie Moon Foreign Mission Offering 1,731.39 

TOTAL $3,848.89 

Gifts to Co-operative Program $ 7,701.62 

Gifts to World Relief 1,329.25 

Other Objects 1,066.40 

GRAND TOTAL $13,94~6X6 



Truly all the years of its life have been full of challenges for Woman's 
Missionary Union, and 1947 offers more than ever. Again we must prove 
ourselves Stewards as we pledge to an all-out effort to secure one-third of 
the million tithers Southern Baptists seek to enlist. 

The watch words of each of our Young Peoples' organizations proclaim 
Christ the Light of the world. Let us dedicate our selves anew to the Great 
Commission of Him who said "Go ye — make disciples of all the nations." 
Respectfully submitted, 

Mrs. N. C. Teague 



Minutes of the 



42. Benediction by J. W. Dickens, Pastor of Center Hill and 
Smith's Grove Churches. 

12:15 P. M. Adjourned for Dinner. 

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON 

43. The Association was called to order at 1:30 p. m. by the 
Moderator, N. C. Teague. 

44. Song, "Work for the Night is Coming." 

45. Devotional by Rev. S. D. Baker, Pastor of South Side Church, 
his subject was "Work." 

Report on Public Morals 

46. This report was prepared and brought by Rev. J. O. Walton, 
Pastor of Mills Home Church. It was Discussed by Hon. L. A. Mar- 
tin, member 1st Church, Lexington. 

When we come to this report, I always think of the Irishman whose 
wife was sick. He was not permitted to see her, but was told each day she 
was improving. One day when he inquired, he was told that his wife was 
dead. In relating his wife's sickness to a friend, he said, "And she died of 
improvements." 

As long as I can remember these reports, each year has been pictured 
a bit darker than the other. There has never been more deploring done 
over any subject than over this one. When we read just before World 
War 1 that there was one divorce for every nine marriages, it looked like 
we had reached the bottom. When we read just before World War 2 that 
there was one divorce for every six marriages, we were sure we had reached 
bottom. But now we read of one divorce for every three marriages, an we 
can see that, at such rate, in a short time there will be one in every two. 
Another will tell you the cause for much of this; I am trying to put facts 
before you. We are told that two out of every three adults in the United 
States drink intoxicating beverages — and that accounts just for the ones we 
have records of; it, of course, does not include the deacon who drinks be- 
hind the door, etc. 

We have in the orphanages of North Carolina thousands of children 
who are depending on worthy citizens to give them a home, an education, 
and fit them for a competitive life and work. Among these orphans, there 
are 1,522 who have both parents living. Of three D's that make up the 
rolls for the orphanages, divorce stands at the top. The other two are 
disease and death. In our Baptist Orphanage, about half of our children 
have both parents living. With the great increase in population and star- 
vation over so much of the world, it is almost impossible to get an increase 
in church and Bible School attendance. 

V/ith the passing of war, for which we prayed so earnestly, we find, 
no doubt, fewer people in religious meetings than before. Judges, one 
after another, repeat that they have found almost no boys and girls in their 
courts who were brought up in church and Sunday school. While the world 
is crying for missionaries and the Bible; while young men and women are 
heeding the call, we as a great host of Southern Baptists are having to re- 
fuse 25 volunteers this year. It is estimated that we will have to refuse 50 
next year. These have answered the call, they have prepared themselves 
for the task. We have, still are doing so, handled lots of money, but the 
Lord has not been honored with His part. 

But a doctor is a poor diagnostician who only diagnoses and does not 



Liberty Baptist Association 



25 



prescribe. So let me prescribe a bit: 

1. Let each consider himself his brother's keeper. 

2. Let each of us become devout Christians at home. 

3. Let each magnify the Christ, present, working with us. 

4. Let each bring his tithes and offerings — stop robbing God. 

5. Let each one major in secret prayer, which is most needed. 

6. When we go for Him, let us leave nothing behind that He can use. 

7. Let each offer himself for dedication, saying, "Here am I; send me." 

J. 0. Walton 

Report on Relief and Annuity 

47. This report was prepared and brought by Dr. F. Maier, First 
Church, Thomasville. It was discussed by Bro. Maier and adopted. 

In the Virginia Baptist Annual of 1944, James R. Bryant says, "It is 
only natural for us to want food when we are hungry. We want fire when 
we are cold. We want shelter when it rains, and we want sympathy when 
we are burdened with grief and sorrow. We want a doctor when we are 
sick. We want friends when we are friendless. The Ministers' Retirement 
Plan is built and designed to provide the necessities of life at the time 
when we need them." 

For many years Southern Baptists have been aware of the needs of the 
aged and disabled ministers. In 1916 Dr. Wm. Lunsford, at a Pastors' 
Conference in Nashville, Tenn.,made an impassioned appeal, at which time 
the Relief and Annuity Board became a recognized possibility. 

Two years later, this Board, by action of the Southern Baptist Conven- 
tion became a corporate reality. Through this plan as put into operation, 
not only the necessities, but some of the comforts of life, as well as provid- 
ed for aged and retired ministers, their widows and eertain others who be- 
cause of their service to Christ and the Denomination are eligible. 

The Government does not make provision for such support. It must 
come from the Churches, It should be considered a priviledge and not a 
burden, to gladden the last days of those who have given their lives to the 
promotion of the Gospel and service to mankind. And there has been a 
magnificent cooperation on the part of many of our churches. It must be 
remembered, however, that the success or failure of the plan depends on 
the interest of the minister and the attitude of the church. Every church, 
whether city or country, must cooperate in order to share in the blessings 
of the plan. In fact the Convention, the church and the minister must 
work unitedly to reap the full benefits as outlined by the Southern Baptist 
Convention. The Associan should help in this also. 

The Board has worked out carefully and fully all details necessary for 
success. The plan provides that each minister shall pay 4% of his salary 
and the church a like amount for building up a substantial retirement 
fund for those eligible 

In 1945 the Widows' Supplemental Annuity Plan was inaugurated and 
has been approved by practically all the State Conventions. The churches 
do not pay toward this plan, but the minister pays V/z^o of his salary and 
the Convention a like amount. 

According to last year's report of the Liberty Association, 19 of our 
churches and pastors were participating in the Retirement Plan. It has 
been suggested that the Executive Committee of the Association be author- 
ized to try to enlist every church and pastor in the plan. 

Respectfully submitted, 

F. A. Maier 



26 



Minutes of the 



Report on American Bible Society 

48. This report was prepared and made by Rev. V. L. Andrews, 
Pastor of Churchland Baptist Church. The report was adopted. 

Imminent doom threatens men and their institutions. The supporting 
evidence scientists furnish in argument and in demonstration convinces 
intelligent people that this is true. Hiroshima, Nagasaki and Bikini have 
"a thousand several tongues" and each tongue testified that civilization 
faces possible extinction. Therefore, the time is at hand when God's Book 
should be put into the hands of all men "of every kindred and tongue and 
people and nation." 

Those who believe the Bible to be the Word of God to guide men in 
their faith, behavior and beliefs, also that the peoples of this earth have 
lost their way and are now facing possible destruction at the hands of their 
own scientific competency, should testify and not argue that the Bible 
points "the way, the truth, and the life." The sense of urgency is laid up- 
on us by the fact that we have on our hands One "World which obviously 
is doomed without the truth of One Book. Neither the world nor the book 
is new, but the imminent danger now facing the world is new. 

A certain Christian leader, in deploring the pitiable if not criminal in- 
difference of the people toward the great danger we face, said, "I do not 
find within the churches even yet a galvanic perception of the nature and 
imminence of the crisis." He reflects his own sense of urgency by adding 
that he would like to see churches spend less time in celebrating their cen- 
tennials and spend more time 'on the prospect that they have only 10 or 20 
or 50 years to go.' 

Just 423 years after Magellan circumnavigated the earth, Wendell Wil- 
kie completed his 49 day flight around the earth, spending only 160 hours 
of that time in the air, and announced One World. What a difference in 
Magellan's One Earth and Wilkie's One World! In Wilkie's One World, 
science had leveled the mountains, reduced the width of the oceans to that 
of a rivulet by eliminating both horizontal and perpendicular distances. 
Nations now found themselves sitting in one another's laps. 

Still little or nothing has been done to make the races color-blind, to 
blend the nationalisms into a community spirit, to level standards of living, 
to weave the ideaoligies into a sound and trustworthy philosopy of life, and 
to make all nations one in Christ Jesus. Reduced to its simplest analysis, 
this means that the peoples of the world are forced to live geographically 
in close proximity to one another where economic, social, racial governmen- 
tal and religio differences make it impossible for them to live together in 
peace like good neighbors. Consequently, our 'one world' is like one big 
cage filled with wild animals whose nature is to prey upon each other, but 
with one striking and significant difference: the animals in our 'one world' 
are human beings who are morally capable of gluttony, greed and cruelty 
not even possible among jungle beast3. 

But this is not all. In addition to moving all the peoples of the world 
with all their differences into one community, as it were, science has placed 
into their hands implements of destruction and death-radar, robot planes, 
chemicals, disease germs, flame throwers and many others. As a result the 
only hope for the human race is in a power which can transform men by 
the renewing of their minds, which can make them new creations who will 
love what they once hated and hate what they once loved. If life and peace 
are to supplant death and discord, minds of flesh must become minds of 



Liberty Baptist Association 



27 



the spirit. This means that the safety of the human family rests absolute- 
ly in a world brotherhood of kindred mind and natures on the high plane 
of Christian equity, justice and righteousness. These things should lead us 
to see that the Bible is God's "must" for the world. 

Since the Bible is the One Book to give us the one thing we need for 
our One World, it is imperative that Evengelical Christians of all creeds and 
colors cooperate to the limit of their ability with the Bible Society in print- 
ing literally millions of Bibles in all languages for distribution among the 
people of all nations. Let them give money in whatever amount may be 
necessary to see that there is a Bible in every home on earth. What Gen- 
eral McArthur said recently concerning the challenge and opportunity that 
Japan offers to Christians may be said of many nations. Said he, "Due to 
the vacuum which events have left in the spiritual phase of Japanese life, 
there now exists an opportunity without counterpart, since the birth of 
Christ, for the spread of Christianity among the peoples of the Far East." 

Let the evangelical churcher take the lead in organizing Bible study 
groups in addition to their Sunday school classes. Let them encourage 
their members, boys and girls too, to own their Bibles and read them daily. 

During the past year the American Bible Society distributed at home 
and abroad 879,616 Bibles, 2,314,900 Testaments and over 8 millian por- 
tions, a total of more than 11 million volumns. During the past year the 
Society donated to prisoners of war and to liberated areas over 224,000 
Bibles, and nearly 3 million New Testaments and Gospels. The Society 
shipped to Germany alone over 1,000,000 volums in whole Bibles, Testa- 
ments and Gospels. It also shipped to Germany sufficient raw material to 
begin printing a million Bibles there. To Japan the Society has shipped 
383,000 New Testaments and 360,356 Gospels. 

The Society has distributed over 16,000,000 reading lists and other 
pieces of reading literature in connection with World-wide Bible Reading, 
Thanksgiving to Christmas. 

It behooves every pastor, Sunday school superintendent, and Christian 
worker to cooperate with the American Bible Seciety in the publishing and 
distributing the Word of God which is the only solution to the world 
problems which face us today. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Victor L. Andreivs, Sr. 

Report on Home Missions 

49. This report was prepared by Mrs. G. C. Lewis, of New Friend- 
ship Church, and was read by Rev. E. F. Baker. 

When Jesus said, "Lift up your eyes, and look on the fields, for they 
are white already to harvest." He might have easily been speaking of 
Southern Baptist territory. There is no greater evangelistic field in the 
world than that of the South. The opportunities are great, for there are about 
56,000,000 people in the Southland, and only about 45% of the population 
in this territory belong to any church. This means that here in our own 
Southland there are millions of lost souls for whom Christ died. Some of 
them may be found in any community, villiage, or city in any section of 
the South. They are LOST souls, lost to God, lost to service, lost to vic- 
torious living, and possibly lost for a godless eternity. Yet these unsaved 
souls in the Southland are more easily won to Christ than the unsaved peo- 
ple in any other place on the earth. Then what are we doing, as Southern 



28 



Minutes of the 



Baptists, to win these people to Christ? Through the HOME MISSION 
BOARD Baptists are trying to meet the needs of evangelization of the South. 

The report of the Board for 1946 shows that we have 720 full time 
Home Missionaries and 200 summer workers from colleges and seminaries 
who served for ten weeks on the various fields, giving us a total of 920 
missionaries. During the past year 87 new missionaries were added. As a 
result of the ministry of these missionaries 44,873 new members were added 
to the churches. 27,474 were reported as conversions. There were conduct- 
ed 7,317 revivals, 381 new missions opened, 131 new churches organized, 
and thousands of mission study classes were taught. 

Work is being carried on among the INDIANS, CHINESE, ITAL- 
IANS, MEXICANS, NEGROES and FRENCH. Also in PANAMA, 
CUBA, COSTA RICA, and CANAL ZONE, as well as among the JEWS. 

Through direct missions the Home Mission Board is teaching those of 
other races in different ways. Some of the ways are through scholarships 
and Institutes. There are scholarships for the Mexican student, most of 
these being helped by the Board receive scholarships of $100.00 per year 
and each choose the college he wishes to attend. 

For the Indians, there are Indian Insitutes designed to give training to 
the Indian leaders and to encourage them in their work. Also the Home 
Mission Board is helping to educate a number of them through scholarships. 

Concerning our educational work among the Negroes, there are Insti- 
tutes and Extension classes. Also $2,500.00 is given annually in scholar- 
ships to help educate Negro youth. 

In Cuba there is need of additional theological training for our mission- 
ary volunteers and preachers. Now we have only ten men and eight women 
in specialized training for the ministry or missionary service in Cuba. 
Through the Annie Armstrong offering last year, the W. M. U. provided 
one-half of the $100,000 needed for the first unit of a Baptist College there. 
College training is an imperative need in advancing our work in Cuba. 

The Home Mission Board carries on much work through city missions, 
camp work, visual education, vacation Bible schools and schools of mis- 
sions. There is also work among the deaf. Through the Co-operative Rural 
Mission Program the Board is helping the rural churches. It is said the 
strength of Baptists lies in their rural churches. 

There has been a rapid growth in Kindergarten work during the past 
four years. The Kindergartens offer one of the best points of contacts for 
christian visitation in homes of non-christian families that we have found. 

Literature played an important part in the ministry of Home Missions. 
Bibles, tracts, and Gospels were distributed. The magizine "SOUTHERN 
BAPTIST HOME MISSION" reached a peak circulation of 121,800. In 
the first five months of 1947 over 80,000 home mission books have been 
sold by our Baptist Book Stores. 

"The harvest truly is plenteous, but the laborers are few; Pray ye there- 
fore the Lord of the Harvest, that he will send forth laborers into his 
harvest." 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mrs. G. C. Lewis 



Liberty Baptist Association 



29 



— ai^MWMMmmaiiMnnii MMMwnmiMMiMMtM— — mmmm iii 1 — m 1 

Report en Obituaries 

50. This report was prepared and made by Rev. B. A. Mit- 
chell, Pastor of Abbotts Creek and Wallburg Churches. The 
report was adopted. 

©ttr Horn? (&azt& 

Who have answered The Call since our Last Session 

"In my Father's House are many Mansions, 
I go to prepare a Place for You." John 14:2 

Abbotts Creek—Mrs. Cora Welborn, Miss Flora Raper, Mrs. 

Saphrona Tedder, 
Carolina Avenue — Mrs. Ira Bailey. 
Center Hill— Mr. H. W. Jones, Mrs. John Palmer. 
Churchland— Mrs. P. C.Shoaf, Mrs. R. A. Shoaf, Deacon R. K. 

Williams, Mrs. Mattie J. Wilson. 
Denton — Mr. 0. D. Carroll, Mr. Aaron Morris, Mr. A. W. Lanning. 
Erlanger— Mrs. J. E. Walker. 
Floyd— Miss Cora Shipton. 
Greenwood — None. 
High Rock Mission — None. 

Holloways — Mr. Jacob W. Lookabill, Mrs. Crissie Owens, Mrs. 

Ada Parker. 
Jersey — None. 

Lake View — None. ; 
Lexington First— Mr. N. A. Hinshaw, Deacon W. L. Tate, Mrs. 

C. R. Leonard, Mrs. L. B. Shugart, Mr. Archie Miller, 

Mrs. R. S. Yarbrough, Mrs. A. A. Gilbert. 
Liberty — None 

Lick Creek — Mr. W. R. Cross, Mrs. Frances Carrick. 

Mills Home — Deacon R. D. Covington, Deacon C. C. McCoin Sr. 

Mountain View — None. 

New Friendship — Deacon Erastus Swaim, Mr. Lincoln Pope, 

Mrs. Lavoda Swaim. 
Oak Hill— None. 
Plesant Plains — None. 

Reeds— Mrs. H. T. Massey, Mrs. C. A. Snider. j 
Reid Street — None. 

Rich Fork—Mr. 0. L. Myers, Mrs. Sallie Arnder, Mrs. Walter \ 
Clinard. ' 

Sheets Memorial — Pastor, Rev. C. S.Young, Mr. Lindsey Hed- 
rick, Mrs. Martha Eppley. 

Smith Grove — None. 

South Side— None 

Stoners Grove— Mr. J. F. Smith. 

Summerville — None. 

Taylors Grove — None. | 
Thomasville— Mrs. Hannah Hamilton, Mrs. R. L. Harville, Mrs. 

C. M. Howell, Mrs. Jim Perry, Mrs. L. A. Bruton. 
Union Grove — None. 
Wallburg— Mr. Levi Yokley. 
Walters Grove — Mrs. E. P. Pierce. 
Welcome — Mrs. W. L. Hoover; Mr. H. H. Lanier. 



so 



Minutes of the 



51. Bro. Wilson Miller made a motion that we dedicate the min- 
utes to Bro. C. M. Wall, deceased, and put his picture in our minutes. 
This was unanimously adopted. 

Report on Radio and Baptist Hour 

52. This report was prepared and made by Rev. R. L. Kiger, Pas- 
tor of Reid Street Church. The report was adopted. 

The youngest agency of the Southern Baptist Convention is the Radio 
Commission, S. F. Lowe, Director, with headquarters at 427]/£ Moreland 
Avenue N. E., Atlanta, Georgia. 

Since 1941 the Radio Commission has broadcast the Baptist Hour for 
at least three months every year, with two three-months periods in 1946. 
The Baptist Hour programs the first quarter of 1947 were evangelistic and 
were designed to promote all that Southern Baptists are doing in the field 
of evangelism. These programs also supported Dr. C. E. Matthews, Secre- 
tary of Evangelism. The Home Mission Board, in launching his program 
to enlist 1,000,000 Baptists to pray daily for a spiritual awakening. 

The Radio Commission has launched two new services during the past 
year. First a special transcribed program is being provided for use in 
Government hospitals. It is a daily devotional designed to meet the spirit- 
ual needs of sick service men. Forty seven hospitals are useing them and 
others are asking for them. The Commission is seeking to meet this grow- 
ing opportunity. 

Second, the Radio Commission is launching a transcription service to 
local churches through which plan a good two-speed record player that can 
play both phonograph and radio records and which retails for $150.00 is 
offered to churches for $100.00. The radio records are made available to 
Churches in 4-record packages on a rental basis of $4.00 per package which 
includes cost of express, packing, processing and programming. Churches 
are already useing these in B. T. U., Sunday school, prayer meeting, in 
church after Sunday school on days other than "preaching day," and in 
hospitals and other institutions in the community. This promises to be 
one of the best services of the Commission. 

The record library of the Commission is available for use over local 
radio stations. Hundreds of stations broadcast some of these programs 
during the current year, with 93 stations airing a series of programs on the 
Christian home during Christian Home Week of this year. These records 
are available free for broadcast over local stations, though there is a modest 
rental when the records are used in the local churches. 

The Commission cooperates with other agencies in the Convention in 
their broadcasting programs. During the current year in response to the 
Y. W. A. Department of the Woman's Missionary Union, the Commission 
arranged for the broadcasting of the series entitled "All Aboard for Adven- 
ture," over 27 stations. Currently it is cooperating with the Home Mission 
Board in airing the Good News Hour over 67 stations, and with the Execu- 
tive Committee, S. B. C, in broadcasting "The Prove Me Hour" over ap- 
proximately 150 stations, and with the Baptist Brotherhood in arranging 
for the broadcasting of a special program over 100 stations on Layman's 
Day, October 12. 

During the meeting of the Southern Baptist Convention in St. Louis, 
the Commission broadcast two television programs. 

The forcast of able radio leadership is that by 1950 television will be 



Liberty Baptist Association 



31 



broadcast on a national scale. What will Southern Baptists enable their 
Radio Commission to do about preparing to use this new and most effec- 
tive medium of mass communication? 

Radio — this modern method of communicating the gospel to the mas- 
ses of people in this critical period of world history offers Baptists an un- 
precedented challenge. What will be their response. 

Respectfully submitted, 

R. L. Kizer 

Report on Foreign Missions 

53. This report was prepared and made by Rev. E. C. Roach. Pastor 
of Denton, Liberty, and Lick Creek Churches. The report was adopted. 

The Foreign Mission Board of the Southern Baptist Convention, in its 
102nd year, faces the most significant opportunities of its history. Appall- 
ing world needs, material and spiritual, constitute a tremendous challenge 
to Southern Baptists. 

In the order of occupation, Southern Baptists have entered China, Ni- 
geria, Italy, Mexico, Brazil, Japan, Argentina, Uruguay, Chile, Palestine- 
Syria, Spain, Romania, Hungary, Yugoslavia, Manchuria, Hawaii, Colum- 
bia, Paraguay, and, early this year, the Gold Coast, West Africa. They 
have also arranged to enter Guatemala and Honduras, which for a time 
to be a part of our Mexico work, directed by national Baptist leaders. 

The Foreign Mission Board has already designated the Hadhramaut in 
South Arabia as a field to be occupied when a medical missionary couple can 
be secured. There are vast possibilities in that area, especially in the field 
of medical missions. 

We have 624 missionaries in active service. Of this number 56 were ap- 
pointed at the April semi-annual meeting of the Board and two more in 
May. 60 missionaries were appointed last year. Even with these additional 
recruits, we have only one foreign missionary to approximately 10,000 
Southern Baptists. 

An encouraging feature of the missionary effort is the development of 
national leadership in practically all mission fields. Messages have been 
recieved in recent weeks concerning bountiful evangelistic harvests. In 
Romania, for instance; hundreds are confessing Christ and following him 
in baptism and Baptists in that land have more freedom in worship and in 
propagating their faith than was ever accorded them before the recogni- 
tion of Baptists as a historic cult. 

From Spain Missionary John Hughey writes that evangelical Christians 
are manifesting unusual interest and enthusiasm. From all of our mission 
fields come gratifying reports of evangelistic zeal, although our comrades 
in service in those lands are beset on every side by adversaries. Within re- 
cent days the way has been opened for the representatives of our Board to 
re-enter Japan. 

The appropriations of the Foreign Mission Board for current mission- 
ary work this year total $2,276,000, an increase of approximately $600,000 
over last year. This increase was due largely to inflation in most areas of 
the Board's work. We must not overlook the fact, too, that with a net in- 
crease of approximately 62 missionaries, long range provision must be made 
not only for their salaries year by year, but for hospitals and equipment, 
training schools, and missionary residences. 

For this reason the Board is to be commended for its wisdom in pro- 



32 



Minutes of the 



viding the reserve fund with which to stabilize our work and maintain 
missionary personnel in any time of financial recessions. We must not re- 
peat our experiences in the dark days of the depression of the early 30's 
when missionaries were recalled, missionary volunteers equipped for service 
were kept at home, and the terribly embarrassing debt amounting at one 
time to $1,800,000 was jeopardizing the existence of the Board. 

Because of the action of the Convention in providing large amounts of 
capital funds for other Southwide agencies, especially our seminaries which 
are indispensable in preparing missionaries for effective service, the two 
general mission boards will face a possible reduction for 1948 in operating 
budgets made available by the Co-operative Program. For this reason the 
Foreign Mission Board is considering a 10% reduction in current appropria- 
tions to all foreign mission fields in 1948. 

There are two ways by which thia calamity in our time of greatest op- 
portunity may be averted. The first is by enlisting Southern Baptists in 
tithing with a minimum goal of 1,000,000 tithers, with a larger percentage 
of increased local church gifts being made available for Southwide purposes. 
The second way is through the Lottie Moon Christmas Offering, which is 
increasing year by year at a gratifying rate. For years this offering has pro- 
vided the funds for practically all buildings and equipment of our Board in 
all our mission fields. Homes for missionaries, school plants, seminary and 
training school buildings, hospitals and their equipment have been made 
available largely by the Christmas offering. As of May 1 this year, the 
1946 Lottie Moon Offering received by the Foreign Mission Board had 
reached the high mark of $1,381,098.76. 

Undesignated receipts for foreign missions last year through the Co- 
operative Program amounted to $2,033,872. For the first four months this 
year Co-operative Program receipts were $778,194.95, an increase of 
$54,091.35 over the corresponding period last year. 

What are we doing for foreign missions? Here are some startling figures. 

Last year Southern Baptists gave for all purposes $115,226,949 both State 

and Southwide. Of this amount less than one-forth, $27,240,704 was given 

for missions and benevolences. For foreign missions the Board received 

last year, not counting relief and rehabilitation funds, $3,884,991.41, an 

average of 64^ per capita. 

We gave $14.47 for local purposes and 64^ for foreign missions! For 

every 22]^ spent on our selves, we gave only 10 to world missions outside 

of our own country. In 1945, of 20 evangelical denominations, Southern 

Baptists ranked 18th, toward the bottom of the list in gifts to foreign 

missions. 

Here are other startling facts. It is estimated that last year American 
people spent $8 billion for alcoholic drinks, $31/2 billion for tobacco, $3 bil- 
lion in gambling, $21/2 billion for schools, and $1 billion for churches. It has 
been estimated that the annual overall cost of crime is $18 billion. 

Isn't it time we were getting a conscience on Scriptural stewardship 
and measure our giving in terms of God's world purposes and program and 
not in terms of selfish desire and personal comfort. 



Liberty Baptist Association 



33 



Our people responded last year in a gratifying way to the appeal of 
relief and rehabilitation. The goal was $3,500,000; the eash receipts totaled 
almost $4,000,000- From every mission field devastated by war have come 
messages of grateful appreciation. Thousands of lives have already been j 
saved and our mission work set forward in a great way. Chinese Baptist ! 
leaders tell us that their churches and missions have been strengthened 
immeasurably by the aid received from Southern Baptists. 

It is heartening to know that during the war not one church, so far as . 
we have learned, discontinued its work and worship even though church 
buildings were destroyed. Relief must be continued as multitudes in war 
devastated lands will die this year of starvation unless relief is sent 
continually. 

The world mission journal, THE COMMISSION, published by the 
Foreign Mission Board, continues to grow in circulation. Already the 
90,000 mark has been reaohed, with every indication that the goal of 
100,000 will be attained within the next year. Every Baptist home should 
have first the Baptist state paper, and after that, the two Southwide mis- 
sionary periodicals, The COMMISSION and HOME MISSIONS. 



54. Address on World Conditions and the Baptist Church, was 
made by Rev. Julian Hopkins, Pastor of Green Street Baptist Church, 
High Point. Bro. Hopkins gave us a brief view of the distress and 
need of Europe at this time and that the war had helped to spread 
the Gospel in foreign countries, stating that Europe seemed to be in 
darkness and that "America is the Light of the World and their 
only hope." 

Adjourned 3:35 p: m. 

Benediction by Rev. Julian Hopkins. Pastor Green St. Church. 



Respectfully Submitted, 

E. C. Roach 



N. C. Teague, Moderator 
A. L. Snider, Clerk 




Baptist Association 



Liberty Baptist Association 



35 



1947 Minutes Dedicated to the Memory of C. M. Wall. 

C. M. Wall was born January 12, 1867, and on May 2nd, 1944 entered 
into that fuller life that he now enjoys. 

During the seventy-seven years of his active life, he at all times reflected 
in a most worthy manner the heritage of a good birth and family back T 
ground. He must have sensed early in life the significance of what Christ 
meant when he said: "I am come that they might have life and that they 
might have it more abundantly." He not only lived abundantly, but he 
made it possible and inspired others to live well. 

He loved children and contemplated their possibilities. He saw in ed- 
ucation the only hope for the fulness of these possibilities. With this in 
mind, he not only gave the members of his immediate family a liberal 
education, but as one of the chief founders and supporters of Liberty-Pied- 
mont Institute, he made it possible for hundreds of young people to succeed 
who otherwise never could have received an education. 

Although he never went to college, he year after year, quietly selected 
worthy boys and girls who wanted to continue their education and financed 
their college course. Some of the most worthy of these came from the 
Baptist Orphanage. Through these he has received a degree more lasting 
and more worthy than any college or university could ever have conferred, 

Mr. Wall was at all times, from his early manhood, a power, a factor 
and a vital force in the life of his church and the progress of his community 
and state. He was a citadel of strength. All turned to him for help when 
a worthy cause was at stake, and he never failed any one. It was always 
safe to follow his judgement. Those who knew him generally, respected 
him highly. Those who knew him intimately loved him. 

For many years Mr. Wall was a valuable member of the Board of 
Trustees of Mars Hill College. There stands on the beautiful campus of 
this mountain institution a building named in his honor. 

One of the most generous of all his gifts was his deed to the Baptist 
Orphanage of the farm and home where he was born and reared at Wallburg. 
This spot where he had spent his childhood had many cherished memories, 
but his love for orphan children was more luring than the memories of the 
past. The farm upon which he worked as a boy will through the years be 
dedicated to the purpose of training boys and producing grain that will in 
a real sense canse him to live tomorrow and tomorrow in the lives of 
orphan children. 

Like Jacob of old he wanted to rest amid the scenes that held for him 
so many hallowed memories. So his body and that of his faithful compan- 
ion now rest within a few feet of where he first saw the light of his long 
and useful life. 

The Orphanage authorities have now dedicated themselves to the task 
of making this one of the most beautiful spots in the entire community. 
A beautiful mauseleum now stands in the spot where the old home once 
stood. This is enduring, but the affection of his family, his friends and those 
he served so well will better guard his tomb and longer preserve his memory 
than the cold shafts of marble and granite that mark his resting place 

It is therefore fitting that by unanimous vote of the Liberty Associa- 
tion, this volume of minutes be dedicated to his memory. 



86 



Minnies of the 



MINUTES of WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 
Report of Secretary 

The Woman's Missionary Union of Liberty Baptist Association met for 
its 41st Annual Session with Churchland Baptist Church April 15, 1947, 
Mrs. P.M. Hendricks, Superintendent, presiding — The Theme for the meet- 
ing was "Jesus Calls Us — " 

The devotionals were led by Mrs. W. A. Smith and Mrs. V. R. Parker. 

The greetings were read by Mrs. Graham Barnes and response was 
made by Mrs. V. W. Sears. 

At the business session the visitors were recognized, committees appoint- 
ed and minutes read with treasurer's report included. 

The following reports were adopted: 

1. Superintendent 4. Training School 

2. Mission Study, 5. Young People 

3. Community Missions 6. Treasurer's Report 

After prayer for two special causes, the Young Woman's Auxiliary, pre- 
sented by Miss Frances Little of Mills Home and the W. M. U. Training 
School, presented by Mrs. N. C. Teague of Reeds Church, and special music. 
Miss Florence Lide, missionary to China was introduced, and made an in- 
spiring address on "Fields White unto Harvest." Miss Lide was most charm- 
ing and earnest in the presentation of her subject, China. 

Rev. Victor L. Andrews led the closing prayer, after which lunch was 
served by the ladies of the hostess church. 

The afternoon session began promptly at 1:30 p. m. with the singing of 
the hymn "Lead On O King Eternal." The W. M. U. Watch Word was re- 
peated in unison. The afternoon program, devoted almost intirely to the 
work of our young people was both interesting and inspiring. Reports were 
made by the Sunbeam Band, Girls Auxiliary, Royal Ambassadors, and 
Young Woman's Auxiliary. 

The Memorial Service was in charge of Mrs. J. Roy Clifford, the follow- 
ing names being listed as among those missing from our rolls: 
Mrs. CM. Howell Mrs. Clark Snider 

" J. D. Newton " Gideon Sink 

" J. W. Huffmon " Ross Yarbrough 

" L. A. Bruton " C. R. Leonard 

The Young People's report by Miss Beatrice Council made our hearts 
rejoice by the fine work being done. Mrs. J. B. Powell, in her report on "What 
Summer Camping has meant to my Young People" was indeed inspiring 
and challenging. Mrs. J. C. Hatfield spoke on "Why I like two meetings 
a month," and Nolan Teague, Ambassador Penipotentiary from Reeds in 
his report on "Mission Study and the Boy" said, "It is wiser to build boys 
than to mend men," which we shall long remember, Mrs. E. F. Baker 
made an inspiring report on "Fostering our Opportunity." 

The high light of the afternoon session was reached in the address by 
Mrs. John Wacaster, State Field Worker, on the subject "Take the Task 
He gives you gladly." 

After special music and report of committees, the following officers 
were nominated and elected: 

Superintendent Mrs. P. M. Hendricks 

Associate Supt 



Liberty Baptist Association 



Secretary-Treasurer ._Mrs. F. H. Wall 

Mission Study Chm __ " N. C. Teague 

Community Mission Chm " R. L. Palmer 

Training School Chm. " V.L.Andrews 

Young Peoples Leader Miss Beatrice Council 

R. A. Leader Rev. N. C. Teague 

Stewardship Chm Mrs. C. C. Coppedge 

Literature Chm " J. N. Shockey 

The closing address was made by Rev. J. Roy Clifford on the subject, 
"Lo, I am with you." 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Mrs. F. H. WALL 
Secretary, W. M. U. 

SUPERINTENDENT'S ANNUAL REPORT— April 1947 

Under the leadership of Mrs. C. B. Atkinson, Liberty Woman's Mis- 
sionary Union worked quietly yet efficiently in many respects. Her clearly 
denned Christian character was an inspiration to each one with whom she 
came in contact. It was with regret that we gave her to another state, but 
we pray God's blessings go with her and her husband in their new field of 
endeavor, knowing that we are the richer for having experienced the joy 
of Christian fellowship with them. 

Herewith is submitted the report of Mrs. Atkinson for 1946: 



SPECIAL 

January — Leadership Conference J 
February — Mission study Institute ! 
March — Executive Com. Meeting ,' 

HONOR 



MEETINGS 

! July— Young People's Rally. One 
! day Camp for Jr, G. A. & R. A.'s. 
! Nov. — Executive Com. Meeting 

ROLL 



W. M. S. Y. W. A. 



G. A. 



R. A. 



Sunbeams 



A-l : 

New Friendship 


: Cnurchiand 
: Lexington 1st 
New Friendship 
Sheets Mem'l 


: Churchland 
I Erlanger Jr. 
Lexington 1st 
Jr. and Int. 
New Friendship 
Jr. and Int. 


• Churchland 

: New Friendship 

• Jr. and Int. 
Reeds 

• Jr. and Int. 


: Abbotts Creek 
Churchland 
Lexington 1st 
New Friendship 


b : 

Denton 
Erlanger 


Erlanger 
Thomasville 


Erlanger, Int. 
Mills Home 
Page Int. 
Schell Jr. 
Thomasville 1st 
Jr. and Int. 


Erlanger, Jr. 
Mills Home 
Judson Int. 
Negrin Jr. 


Erlanger 
Jersey 


c : 

Lexigton 1st 
Sheets Mem'l 
Reeds : 
Wallburg 


Carolina Ave. 
Denton • 


Rich Fork 


Erlanger, Int. 
Lexington Jr. 


Reeds 

Thomasville 1st. 



FULLY GRADED UNIONS 
Churchland Lexington 1st New Friendship 

Erlanger Mills Home Thomasville 1st 

SPECIAL MENTION 
New Friendship A-l Fully Graded Union for the 13th Year. 

Churchland, Liberty, and Mills Home received a missionary gift from 
every resident woman member. 



38 



Minutes of the 



FINANCIAL REPORT— 1946 

1st Qtr. 2nd Qtr. 3rd Qtr. 4th Qtr, 

Cooperative— W. M. S. $1,513.87 $1,483.30 $1,374.45 $1,620.12 

Cooperative— Y. P. 438.98 393.11 439.60 422.72 

Special — W. M.S. 857.95 1,062.85 1,369.43 2,778.63 

Special— Y. P. 228.91 252.51 397.86 357.12 

TOTALS- $3,039.71 $3,191.77 $3,568.32 $5,178.59 

Cooperative figures for the past two years: 

Women Y. P. TOTAL 

1945 $11,472.87 $2,497.32 $13,970.19 

1946 12,176.04 2,805.35 14,981.39 

The Association made over a 5% increase in Cooperative gifts and 
special offerings. 

STANDARD OF EXCELLENCE 

!., As an Association, we are not A-l in that we failed to reach points 7 
and 9 on the Standard of Excellence. We did not have a ten per cent net 
increase in enrollment, nor did we have a ten per cent net increase in num- 
ber of organizations. 

Worthy aims for 1947 might well be considered: 

(1) A need for new organizations, both among women and young people. 
At present we have 7 churches with W. M. S. that have no Y. P, organ- 
ization, and 8 churches with no organizations. 

(2) A need for more consecrated leaders among women and men for the 
young people. Our R. A.'s need consecrated men. 

(3) A need for rededication of our lives in His service, for the fields are 
"white unto harvest." 

Respectfully submitted, 
Mrs. P. M. HENDRICKS, 
Superintendent, pro tem. 

MISSION STUDY REPORT 
For the Liberty W. M. U., April 15, 1947 
At Churchland Baptist Church 

W.M.S. Y.W.A. G.A. R.A. S.B. Total 

No. of Classes 69 15 39 29 15 167 

No. in Classes 734 91 339 239 270 1673 

No. of Seals 401 66 268 224 260 1219 

No. Reading Stamps .3 1 48 3 55 

Continuation Cert 6 6 

No. Official Seals 13 13 

No. Honor Seals 2 2 

We had an Associational Mission Study Institute during the year. 
There were Four Schools of Missions Held. 

Reporting this first quarter: 3 churches have reported mission study 
classes using the new Home Mission series of books on Evangelism. 3 other 
churches have studied other books. I'd like to call attention to the infor- 
mation given on pages 46 and 47 of the new Year Book— Every Mission 
Study Chairman should study these pages and follow the suggestions laid 
down. If we as Southern Baptists are to answer the challenge of to-day 



Liberty Baptist Association 



89 



we need to study more and read more missionary books. I hope each 
church will strive to have every member read at least one missionary book 
during this year. 

Respectfully Submitted, 
Mrs. N. C. TEAGUE 
Mission Study Chm. 

REPORT ON W.M.U. COMMUNITY MISSIONS 
Of the Liberty Association — 1946 

"Community Missions is Christ-like living in regard to those about us." 
The field of community missions, then, is the local or immediate vicinity 
with in the bounds of the association. 

The primary objective of all phases of community missions is the win- 
ning of souls to Christ. When we fail through acts of kindness, helpfulness, 
or unselfish endeavor to point those whom we have attempted to help to 
Christ, we are failing to reach the goal. 

In checking over the number of organizations reporting last year you 
will find the total W. M. S. to be 116 with a membership of 801. The total 
number of conversions reported to your Community Mission Chairman was 9. 
Divide this number into 801 and you will find that it took more than 88 of 
us to win one soul to Christ. 

You and I should come to Him with contrite hearts begging His for- 
giveness and pledging anew to put first things first in Community Missions. 

The following is a digest of reports sent in: 

W.M.S. Y.W.A. G.A. R.A. S. B. Total 

1. Endeavoring to enlist all 

members in Comm. Missions __12 7 19 10 8 56 

2. Having Comm. Mission 

Committee 13 7 13 9 42 

3. Reporting Comm. Missions .15 7 22 11 8 63 

4. No. of Surveys 6 3 2 5 16 

5. No. Classes studying 

Guide to Comm. Missions __ 6 5 11 

6. Classes studying book on 

Soul Winning 5 3 8 

7. Engaged in definate 

Evangelistic Effort 14 7 5 3 29 

8. No. of members engaged 

in Comm. Missions 1431 

May we determine that we shall with the help of God win at least one 
soul to Christ for each organization during 1947. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Mrs. VICTOR L, ANDREWS 
Community Missions Ch airman 

REPORT ON TRAINING SCHOOL 

North Carolina is well represented at our Training School in Louisville 
this year by 19 girls from our State. We are proud of this group who will 
go out to serve over all the world as Missionaries, Pastor's wives, Educa- 
tional or Music Directors, or Pastor's Assistants. We have a part in mak 
ing possible their training through our gifts to the Training School. 
A portion of our gifts to the Cooperative Program goes to the School, but 
our most substantial offering goes through the Heck Memorial Offering- 
which is taken in June. 



Minutes of the 



Our Association has given a love gift to the North Carolina girls in the 
Training School for the past few years. This is a free-will gift from the 
W. M. U. organizations of the Association. We send the gift in February so 
that the girls will receive it near Valentine time. This past February we 
sent each girl a large box of stationary. 16 churches had a part in this gift. 

We also make a love gift to the Margaret Fund students through the 
Burney Fund each year. These are missionaries' children who are in the 
Training School. 

There is a greater gift that all of our churches need to give to the mis- 
sion work of our Denomination — that gift is our young people. Let us en- 
courage our young people to give themselves for training to serve in full 
time religious work. W. M.U. organizations would do well to start a fund 
to send some young person from their church to the Training School. Let 
us give not only our money, but ourselves in prayer that our young people 
will be challenged by the need of the world for Christ and will go to serve 
Him even to the ends of the earth. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Mrs. R. G. JENNINGS, Training School Chm. 

YOUNG PEOPLE'S REPORT— 1946 

It would be wonderful if the report of the young people's work for the 
year 1946 could be made with out one discouraging note; but, when you 
hear that there are 16 churches and missions in the Liberty Association last 
year with out young people's organizations, you are going to say with 
me, "we have done nothing of which we may boast." However, it fills our 
hearts with joy when we go back and review the work of the year and see 
that we did make progress, not only in numbers and contributions, but also 
in love and devotion to our Master. 

It is said that one way that we show our love is by our gifts. During 
the year we contributed as follows: 

Coop. Special 
Program Offering 

Y. W. A $ 401.53 $ 338.54 

G. A 608.19 419.86 

R. A 402.10 302.54 

Sunbeams . 282.59 . 275.46 

Totals $1,694.41 $1,336.40 

Total for all causes in 1946 $3,030.81 

Comparative figures for two years: 

1945 1946 Increase 

Cooperative Program $1,352.10 $1,694.41 $342.31 

Special Offerings 1,145.22 1,336.40 191.18 

Total increase $233.49 

Another way in which the young people have gone forward is in their 
reading and studying. Last year there was 101 Mission Study Classes 
taught; an increase of 14 over the preceding year. The young people sub- 
scribed to 201 missionary periodicals. There was more interest in the For- 
ward Steps and the Ranks than there was in 1945. 

19 organizations rated A-l in the Standard of Excellence, 12 rated "B" 
and 7 "C". Special mention should be made of the young people in the 
New Friendship and Churchland Churches, all their organizations are A-l. 



Liberty Baptist Association 



hi 



The One-Day Camp for Juniors, that was held at Mills Home July 5, 
was the beginning of a new feature of associational work which perhaps 
will grow from year to year and possibly play an important part in the 
missionary education of our juniors. 

Liberty Association is more fortunate than many associations in the 
state in that she has a R. A. Leader. For several years Rev. N. C. Teague, 
pastor of Reeds Church, has served us faithfully and well. 

There are many worthy aims for 1947. There are two that should be 
kept constantly in mind: 

1. The Standard of Excellence for each organization as prepared by the 
W. M. U. of the Southern Baptist Convention. These Standards should be 
studied and considered important guides. One has been sent to each Coun- 
selor for her note-book. 

2. The need for new organizations, especially in those churches where 
there are none. When leadership is no longer a problem, organizations will 
naturally follow. 

We have this from an editorial in last week's Biblical Recorder, "The 
W. M. U. in any church is a powerhouse for spirituality and service. It seems 
strange that any pastor or leader would be satisfied not to have W. M. U. 
organizations in his church." 

Another quotation that tells the importance of our task: "If we work 
upon marble it will perish; if we work upon brass, time will efface it; if we 
rear temples, they will crumble into dust; but if we work upon immortal 
minds, if we imbue them with principles, with the just fear of God and love 
of our fellow men, we engage on those tablets something that will brighten 
to all eternity." 

BEATRICE COUNCIL— Y. P. Leader 
TREASURER'S REPORT 



Receipts for 1946 $87.53 

Disbursements for 1946: 

April 6— Mr.A. R. Gallimore _ $ 5.00 

April 6— Mrs. C.B.Atkinson. (Supt.) 10.00 

April 8— Charity and Children (Programs) 6.15 

April 10— Miss Council (Y.P. Work) 15.00 

July 26. _Mrs. C.B.Atkinson (Expenses) 10.00 

July 26— Expenses for Sunbeam Institute 

and Young People's Council 15.00 

July 26— Coarity and Children (Printing) 6.00 

Jan. 15— Mrs. A. K. Knight 

(Leadership Conference Speaker) 5.00 

Jan. 15— Programs (For Same) 2.75 

Jan. — Mrs. N. C. Teague 

(Mission Study Institute Expenses) 10.00 

Total $84,90 

April Balance $2.63 



Respectfully submitted, 
Mrs. F.H. WALL, Treasurer W. M. U. 



Minutes of the 



Minutes of Baptist Training Union 

LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

The Associational simultaneous Training Union mass meeting was held 
Dec. 6, 1946 with the Erlanger Church; Miss Elizabeth Crow, presiding. 

The meeting was opened with appropiate singing, led by E. T. McDade. 

There were 208 present. The theme was "The Challenge for 1947." 
given by the Associational Officers 

Dr. I. G. Greer of Mills Home made the address on "Church Training." 

Joe Ayersof, Lexington 1st, sang a solo, "Silent Night." 

The meeting was adjourned with benediction by Rev. N. C. Teague. 



The Associational quarterly mass meeting of the Training Union met 
at Center Hill Church, March 30, 1947. 

The meeting was opened with the singing of two hymns, and Miss Crow 
led the devotion period. 

There were 189 present. Mills Home won the banner. 

The elimination contest was held. The following are the winners from 
the Association to go to the Regional Meeting: 

Junior Memory Work — James Garris, Harry Smith, Peggy Malloy, 
Paul Garrison, Marjorie Carroll, and Hattie Putnam of Mills 
Home, and Betty Strange of Lexington 1st. 

Intermediate Sword Drill — Rullah Nell Beck, of Sheets Memorial 

Better Speakers Contest— Ruby Hall, Thomasville 1st. 

Adult Bible Reading — Miss Hazel Crady of Lexington 1st. 

Hymn Festival — Girls Choir of Mills Home. 

Benediction was pronounced by Rev. Andrews. 



The Associationl quarterly mass meeting of the Training Union met 
at Thomasville 1st, June 22, 1947. The meeting was opened with the sing- 
ing of "I Love Thy Kingdom Lord" and prayer by J. C. Hatfield. 

There were 48 present with Churchland winning the banner. 

The director announced that the Association was A-l and thanks all 
churches for the splended cooperation given her this year. 

A nominating committee was appointed to select the officers for next 
year. Rev. Charles Leek, Horace Buchanan, and Mrs. Nyal Yarborough. 

Special music was given by Mrs. E. T. McDade. 

Rev. Leek led the devotional. Miss Crow gave an interesting story on 
"Begin Early." 

Adjourned with the singing of "Lead On O King Eternal," and prayer 
by Rev. Andrews. 



The Training Union met Sept. 28 with the Churchland Church for the 
annual business meeting. 

The meeting was opened with songs led by Mrs. Nyal Yarborough and 
prayer by Rev. Digh. 



Liberty Baptist Association 



A3 



The regional meeting on Oct. 10 with the First Baptist Church of High 
Point was announced. 

The Training Union was A-l Standard again. 

Rev. Charles Leek, Chairman of the nominating committee, gave the 
following report: 

Director Mr. J. H. Honeycutt, Mills Home 

Associate Director Mr. Paul Kysler, Churchland 

Pastor Advisor Rev. Digh, Sheets Memorial 

Choir Leader Miss Dorthy Loftin, Lexington 1st 

Pianist Mrs. Mock Hedriek, Erlanger 



The meeting was closed with the song "Faith of Our Fathers" and 
prayer by Rev. C. C. Matheny. 




Adult Leader Mr. M. F. Brown, New Friendship 

Y. P. Leader . Miss Gene Smith, Oak Hill Mem'l 

Int. Leader Miss Troy Jarrett, Center Hill 

Junior Leader Miss Velva Doughtry, Mills Home 

Story Hour Leader Mrs. King, Wallburg 



Elizabeth Crow, Director 
Hazel Frady, Secretary 




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Minutes of the 



Historical Table off the Association 

Year WHERE HELD PREACHER MODERATOR CLERK 
1832.. .1 Jamestown Geo. W. Purefoy Wm. Burch Peter Owen 

1833 Holloways Josiah Wiseman Eli Carroll Peter Owen 

1834 -Abbotts Creek Eli Carroll Eli Carroll Peter Owen 

1835 Liberty John Culpepper Eli Carroll Peter Owen 

1838 Jersey Eli Carroll Eli Carroll Peter Owen 

1837 Lick Creek Peter Owen Eli Carroll ... Peter Owen 

1838 Abbotts Creek Benjamin Lanier JEli Carroll Peter Owen 

1839... 2 Pine Meeting H. ...Eli Carroll Eli Carroll Peter Owen 

1840 Holloways Josiah Wiseman Eli Carroll Peter Owen 

1841 New Friendship Benjamin Lanier Gershom Tussey Peter Owen 

1842 Reeds X Roads ......Barton Roby Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

1843 Lick Creek Benjamin Lanier Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

1844 Abbotts Creek Wm. Turner Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

1845 Jersey Alfred Kenney Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

1846 Lick Creek Wm. Turner Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

1847 Abbotts Creek Wm. Turner Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

1848 Reeds X Roads Benjamin Lanier Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

1849. ..3 Big Creek Azariah Williams Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

1850. ..1 Jame3town Benjamin Lanier Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

1851 Liberty Wm. Turner Wm. Turner Azariah Williams 

1852 Holloways Z. Minor Wm. Turner Azariah Williams 

1853 Abbotts Creek Benjamin Lanier Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

1854 Reeds X Roads Alfred Kinney „ Josiah Spurgeon Azariah Williams 

1855 Lick Creek Benjamin Lanier Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

1856 Abbotts Creek (Unknown) Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

1857 Reeds X Roads Wm. Lambeth Amos Weaver Azariah Williams 

1858 Holloways Amos Weaver Amos Weaver Azariah Williams 

1859 New Friendship Benjamin Lanier Benjamin Lanier J. H. Owen 

1860 Abbotts Creek Wm. Turner Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

1861 Jersey J. B. Jackson J. B. Jackson Azariah Williams 

1862 Lick Creek F. H. Jones J. B. Jackson Azariah Williams 

1863 Abbotts Creek T. W. Tobey J. B. Jackson Azariah Williams 

1864 Thomasville W. H. Hammer Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

1865 (No Session Held On Account of Conditions Caused By Civil War) 

1866 Lick Creek W. T. Waters Benjamin Lanier J. H. Owen 

1867 .Abbotts Creek Benjamin Lanier Benjamin Lanier J. H. Owen 

1868 Jersey W. H. Hammer Benjamin Lanier J. H. Owen 

1869 Abbotts Creek ......A.P.Stokes Wm. Turner J.H.Owen 

1870... 3 Big Creek Wm. Turner Wm. Turner J. H. Owen 

1871. ..2 Pine Meeting H. ...W. H. Wingate Wm. Turner J. H. Owen 

1872 New Friendship H. Morton J. H. Brooks J. L. Pleasant 

1873 Holloways Thomas Carrick H. Morton ...Thomas Carrick 

1874 Lick Creek A. F. Reid . ....Wm. Turner Thomas Carrick 

1875... 4 Muddy Creek C. T. Bailey Wm. Turner Thomas Carrick 

1876 Reeds X Roads H. W. Reinhart „ Wm. Turner Thomas Carrick 

1877 High Point J. B. Richardson Wm. Turner Henry Sheets 

1878... 3 Big Creek H. W. Reinhart „ H. W. Reinhart Henry Sheets 

1879 Liberty Harvey Hatcher „„ H. W. Reinhart Henry Sheets 

1880 Holloways S. F. Conrad _ H. W. Reinhart Henry Sheets 

1881 Jersey Henry Sheets H. W. Reinhart Henry Sheets 

1882... 4 Muddy Creek ......8. H. Thompson H. W. Reinhart Henry Sheets 

18S3...2 Pine Meeting H. ...O. F. Gregory H. W. Reinhart Henry Sheets 

1884 Summerville S. H. Thompson ....Wm. Turner Henry Sheets 

1885 Lexington J. B. Richardson Wm. Turner Henry Sheets 

1886 Abbotts Creek J. B. Richardson .'. Wm. Turner Henry Sheets 

1887 Lick Creek Henry Sheets James Smith Henry Sheets 

1888 Reeds X Roads C. Durham Wm. Turner Henry Sheets 

1889 New Friendship W. F. Watson James Smith Henry Sheets 

1890 Jersey J. M. Bennett - James Smith Henry Sheets 

1891. ..2 Pine Meeting H. ...J. K. Fant James Smith Henry Sheets 



Liberty Baptist Association 



Year WHERE HELD PREACHER MODERATOR CLERK 

1892 High Point Henry SheetB James Smith Henry Sheets 

1893 Kernersville R. T. Byran James Smith Henry Sheets 

1894 Holloways R. Vandeventer James Smith Henry Sheets 

1895 Pleasant Grove J. H. Hilliard James Smith Henry Sheets 

1896 Denton Henry Sheets James Smith Henry Sheets 

1897. ..5 Piney Grove W. H. Rich James Smith Henry Sheets 

1898 Rich Fork J. H. Lambeth James Smith Henry Sheets 

1899 Abbotts Creek S. B. Wilson James Smith Henry Sheets 

1900 Reeds X Roads W. H. Rich James Smith Henry Sheets 

1901 Lexington C. A. G. Thomas James Smith Henry Sheets 

1902 Lick Creek Henry Sheets James Smith Henry Sheets 

1903 Jersey ...W. A. Smith James Smith Henry Sheets 

1904... 2 Pine Meeting H, ...Geo. P. Harrill James Smith Henry Sheets 

1905 New Friendship John R. Miller James Smith Henry Sheets 

1906 Thomasville J. S. Farmer James Smith Henry Sheets 

1907 Wallburg R. T. Vann J. W. Nowell P. S. Vann 

1908 Denton M. L. Kesler J. W. Nowell P. S. Vann 

1909 Liberty S. D. Swaim Henry Sheets P. S. Vann 

1910 Orphanage O. A. Keller Henry Sheets P. S. Vann 

1911 Abbotts Creek G. A. Martin Henry 8heets P. S. Vann 

1912 Stoners Grove O.A.Keller Henry Sheets! P. S. Vann 

1913 Rich Fnrk M. L. Kesler Henry Sheets P. S. Vann 

1914 Holloways G. A. Martin G. A. Martin Henry Sheets 

1915 Center Hill . .0. A. Keller O. A. Keller Henry Sheets 

1916 Wallburg I. M. Mercer O. A. Keller Henry Sheets 

1917 Smith Grove Fred D. Hale R. S. Green Henry Sheets 

1918 Lexington M. L. Kesler R. S. Green Archibald Johnson 

1919 Denton R. E. White R. S. Green Archibald Johnson 

1920 New Friendship J. S. Hardaway, R. S. Green Archibald Johnson 

1921 Churchland M. L. Kerler R. S. Green Archibald Johnson 

1922 Summerville W. A. Hough R. S. Green Paul C. Newton 

1923 Abbotts Creek W. L. Barrs Archibald Johnson ...Panl C. Newton 

1924 Reeds C. H. Trueblood Archibald Johnson ...Sam J. Smith 

1925 Liberty C. A. Owens Archibald Johnson ...Sam J. Smith 

1926 Rich Fork E. N. Gardner Archibald Johnson ...Sam J. Smith 

1927. :. ...Thomasville .H. T. Penry Archibald Johnson ...Sam J. Smith 

1928 Holloways ....M. L. Kesler Archibald Johnson ...Sam J. Smith 

1929 Stoners Grove J. M. HayB Archibald Johnson ...Sam J. Smith 

1930 Abbotts Creek M. L. Kesler Archibald Johnson ...Sam J. Smith 

1931 Denton M. O. Alexander G. Wilson Miller Sam J. Smith 

1932 Lexington G. A. Martin G. Wilson Miller Sam J. Smith 

1933 Lick Creek E. F. Mumford ...G. Wilson Miller Sam J. Smith 

1934 Jersey W. L. Warfford G. Wilson Miller Sam J. Smith 

1935 Mills Home E. C. Roach R. D. Covington Sam J. Smith 

1936 Reeds J. A. Neilson R. D. Covington Sam J. Smith 

1937 Churchland W. K. McGee R. D. Covington Sam J. Smith 

1938 Denton John A. McMillian G. Wilson Miller Sam J. Smith 

1939 Wallburg H. M. Stroup R. D. Covington Sam J. Smith 

1940...... Center Hill L. S. Gaines R. D. Covington Sam J. Smith 

1941 New Friendship N. C. Tiague R. D. Covington Sam J. Smith 

1942 Abbotts Creek R. A. Horring H. M. Stroup Sam J. Smith 

1943 Lexingson B. A. Mitchell H. M. Stroup Sam J. Smith 

1944 Thomasville C. B. Atkinson H. M. Stroup A. L. Snider 

1945 Jersey V. W. Sears N. C. Teague A. L. Snider 

1946 Denton ....J. Roy Clifford N. C. Teague A. L. Snider 

1947 Wallburg ...E. F. Baker N. C. Teague A. L. Snider 

1. Now is High Point 4. Now is Clemmonsville 

2. Now is Churchland 5. Now is Wallburg 

3. Now is Eldorado 



Liberty Baptist Association 

North Carolina 

t 1948 

••ax®* <2^fQ (5^- 

ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTEENTH ANNUAL SESSION 
HELD WITH 
SMITH GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH 
RT. I. LINWOOD, N. C. 

September 30-October 1, 1948 



The next Session will be held September 27th and 28th, 1949 
With Sheets Memorial Baptist Church 
Lexington, N. G. 



Liberty Baptist Association 



North Carolina 

1948 

• • • (J/3 • (5>*i • • 

ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTEENTH ANNUAL SESSION 

HELD WITH 

SMITH GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH 

RT. 1, LINWOOD, N. C. 

September 30-October 1, 1948 




next Session will be held September 27th and 28, 1949 
With Sheets Memorial Baptist Church 
Lexington, N. C. 



Hand Set and Printed by 
I Homestead Print Shop 

| Rt. 6, Winston-Salem, N. C. 
jg Maskey M. Smith, Proprietor 

tr»_r. — n. .i nn n_^n 



z 



jinnies of the 



INDEX 

Annual Sermon 12 

Constitution and By-Laws 

Committee Reports: Executive 19 

Finance 29 

Obituary 30, 

Officers for Next Year 

Program 

Reception of Churches 1 

Resolutions 15, 2 

Reporters for Next Year 2 

Time, Place and Preacher 1 

Directory: Association al 

Auxiliaries 

Choir 7 

Church 

State Institutions 

Historical Table 42 

Map of Association 4 

Messengers to Association 

Minute Fund 3 

Minutes of W. M. U. 32-3 

Proceedings Begin 

Reports: Associational Missionary 1 

American Bible Society 2 

Baptist Hospital 1 

Christian Education 1 

Christian Literature 2 

Church Music 1 

Deaconship 1 

Foreign Missions 2( 

Home Misssions 2( 

Orphanage 1 __1 £ 

Public Morals 2,' 

Reliel and Annuity 2 

State of Churches 1 

State Missions 1 

Sunday School 1 

Training Union 1 

Treasurer 1 

Woman's Missionary Union _- 2 

Tables, Statistical 36-4 



3 



Constitution and Bylaws 

Name 

Article 1. The name of the body shall be "The Liberty Baptist 
isociation." 

Object 

Article 2. It shall be the object of this Association to furnish the 
>spel (as we hold it) to the people within the bounds of the Association, 
d to co-operate with the Baptist State Convention. 

Membership 

Article 3. The Association shall consist of the officers of the Associa- 
»n, pastors of the churches of the Association^and messengers from the 
urches. Each shall be entitled to 3 messengers and 1 additional messen- 
r for every 50 members or fraction thereof over and abo/e 100 members. 

Officers 

Article 4. The officers of this Association shall be a moderator, vice- 

Dderator, a treasurer and a clerk, all of whom shall be elected each year 

the Association at its annual meeting and shall hold office until their 

ccessors are elected. The duties of the officers shall correspond to the 

ties of the same officers in like organizations, or as defined by the Asso- 

ttion from time to time. 

Board and Committees 

Article 5. The Association shall elect an Executive Committee each 
ar whose duties shall be to look after having the gospel preached in all 
rts of the Association, and to attend to all business in the Association 
tween the session and to make such reports as they deem advisable at 
e annual meeting of the Association. The Association may appoint or 
;ct such other boards or committees from time to time as circumstances 
ay require. Time of Meeting 

Article 6. The Association shall meet annually on Tuesday after tho 
Lirth Sunday in September. The Moderator may, at the request of the 
cecutive Committee change the time and place of meeting of this Asso- 
ition when it may be deemed by him not expedient to meet at the time 
place appointed. (Article 6 amended as above Sept. 6, 1944.) 

Vacancies 

Article 7. The Moderator in concurrence with the Executive Com- 
ittee may fill any vacancy occuring between meetings of the Association. 

Amendments 

Article 8, This Constitution may be amended at any regulor session 
the Association by a two-thirds vote of the number present. 

By-Laws 

No By-Laws adopted. This Association follows Kerfoot's Rules of 
•der for Parliamentary Authority. 

STANDING RESOLUTIONS 

ORDINATION OF NEW MINISTERS 
(As recommended by the Executive Committee and adopted by the Association.) 
See Page 27, 1939 Minutes. 

1. That when a church desires to put forth a candidate for examin- 
ion and approval for ordination to the full work of the Gospel Ministry, 
1 Examining Council be summoned by written invitation of at least one 
eek in advance from the church nominating the candidate, the Council 



4 jinnies of the 



to include the pastor and one member-at-large from each Baptist Churc 
in the fellowship of the Association. 

2. That the examination of the candidate be conducted publicly in th 
auditorium of the nominating church, and prior to announcement given in goo 
time so that all the brethren who wish to do so may attend the examinatioi 

3. That we ordain only those who have received definate call to b«' 
come pastor of a Baptist Church in regular standing in its Association 
which church shall have requested his ordination. 

Organization and Admission of New Churches 

(See Page 20, 1941 Minutes.) 

It is recommended that any group of individuals desiring to organi2 
themselves into a new church with the purpose of seeking the reeognitio 
of and the fellowship and co-operation with this Association, be requeste 
to fulfill the following requirements: 

1. Notice shall be given to the Moderator of the Association of th 
desire to organize a church before any such organization takes place. Th' 
Moderator will then ask the Promotion Executive Committee to study an 
pass upon the need of and the practicability for such an organization. 

2. The location of said church shall be sufficiently removed so as nc 
to interfere with the work or encroach upon the territory of the church* 1 
already affiliated with the Association. This will be determined by tb 
Promotion Executive Committee. 

3. Upon being approved by the Promotion Executive Committee th 
group will then request a council to examine the church covenant and th 
articles of faith of the proposed church. It is recommended that this corn 
cil consist of three pastors and three laymen of the Association appointe 
by the Moderator. Should this council approve the covenant and artick 
of faith, the group will then proceed to be constituted into a Baptist Churc 
of the same faith and order. 

4. The new church, having been duly organized and constituted, ma 
at the next annual Association present a letter to the Association askinj 
for recognition and seeking fellowship with the Association, including witj 
this letter a copy of the Articles of Faith and the Church Covenant adop|; 
ed by the body, as well as a report of the work since time of organizatio 
as it regards ail phases of our Baptist Program of Missions, Evangelisn 
Education, Social Service, Training, and Worship. 

5. The previously appointed council of three pastors and three laj 
men v/ill examine the letter and reports of the newly organized church, an 
will recommend to the Association its acceptance or rejection as the casii 
may be. 

Resolution in Regard to Program Committee 

(The following two resolutions adopted See Page 31, 1941 Minutes) 

That the Program Committee consist of the officers of the Association 
pastors of the entertaining churches and three persons named by the Moc 
erator during the session of the Association. 

Resolution in Regard to Messengers 

That the names of messengers printed in the minutes include only thos 
actually attending the Associtaion from the delegations elected by th 
churches. 



5 



Association a l Executivc Committee 

(The following was adopted See Page 38, 1942 Minutes) 

Your committee recommends that: An Executive Committee of the 
issociation to be formed of 7 members, including tha Moderator and Clerk 
f the Association, the Chairman of the Executive-Promotion Committee 
,nd 4 other members elected by the Association along with the other offi- 
ers of the Association; the committee to attend to Associational business 
ietween the annual meeting, their actions to be reported to and reviewed 
>y the Association annually. (This Executive Committee will transact 
Lssociational business; the Promotion-Executive Committee will promote 
he Association and Co-operative Program as formely.) 



[All Addresses herein are in North Carolina unless otherwise indicated] 

Directory of Association 

Officers 

lev. N. C. Teague, Moderator Rt. 3, Lexington 

. O. Walton, Vice-Moderator . Thomasville 

S L. Snider, Clerk and Treasurer Box 96, Denton 

Promotion Executive Committee 
NAME CHURCH ADDRESS 

1. F. Baker, Chm New Friendship Rt. 5, Winston-Salem 

V. P.- Davis Abbotts Creek Rt. 1, Kernersville 

Villie Gillam Carolina Avenue Thomasville 

toward Parke Center Hill Box '21, Lexington 

,. E. Rickard Cimrchland Rt. 1, Linwood 

l. L. Snider Denton Box 96, Denton 

). C. Matheny Erlanger Erlanger 

). L. Owens .Floyd Rt. 6, Lexington 

)ewey Lindon". Glennanna 315 Jul. Avenue, Thomasville 

V, H Hilton Greenwood Thomasville 

Seecher Cameron High Rock Rt.l, Denton 

I. C. Palmer Holloways Rt. 6, Lexington 

I. L. Palmer Jersey Rt. 1, Linwood 

Charles Sigmond Lake View .... Rt. 1, Linwood 

am. J. Smith Lexington Lexington 

). F. Hughes Liberty Rt. 2, Thomasville 

J; C. Cole Lick Creek High Rock 

1 F. Motsinger New Friendship Rt. 5, Winston-Salem 

leno Wall Mills Home Thomasville 

eff L. Carrick Mountain View Rt. 6, Lexington 

)avid Oldham Oak Hill Memorial Rt. 2, HighPoint 

?olon Yates Pleasant Plains Denton 

. C. Leonard Reeds Rt. 3, Lexington 

t Curry Ragan Reid Street Thomasville 

Villie Bowers Rich Fork Thomasville 

loy G. Orrell Smith Grove Lexington 

I. W. Byars Sheets Memorial Lexington 

!dd Epps South Side Thomasville 

I. E. Lookabill :Stoners Grove Southmont. 

fl. L. Bean Summerville Rt. 1, Denton 

I H. Owens Taylors Grove Lexington 

! r B. Laws Thomasville 1st Thomasville 

ilvery White Union Grove Rt. 1, Lexington 

L W. Rhodenhiser Wallburg- 1820 S. Main St., Winston-Salem 

oe Pierce Walters Grove Jackson Creek 

ft. L. Craver Welcome Welcome 

"he Moderator, Clerk, and all Pastors of Association Ex-Omcio Members.. (Pg. 13, 1933 Minutes) 

Associational Executive Committee 
lev. N. C. Teague Rt. 3, Lexington C. V. Teague Wallburg 

| L. Snider Box 96, De-ntor R ev . Chas. F. Leek Thomasville 

i!ev. E. F. Baker Rt. 5, Winston-Salem „ r TT , _. 

■cv. C. C. Matheny Erlanger w - H - Lomax Linwood 

Associational Missionary Committee 

liipv. N. C. Teague, Chm....Rt. 3, Lexington Rev. J. Roy Clifford Lexington 

|l L -| n w e ^? eC -' Tra S;"K-w ?t9 ? ,D | n i ton J. D. Fraley Thomasville 

Ifpv. E. F. Baker Rt. 5, Winston-Salem „ T TT T 

|v. B. A. Mitchell Rt. 1, Kernersville W - H - Lomax Rt. 1, Linwood 



6 



^JJfltitutes of t\]t 



Associational Missionary 

Rev. W. Vann Carroll Rt. 3, Lexington|| 

Associational Auxiliaries 

Woman's Missionary Union 

Mrs. P. M. Hendricks, Supt Lexingtor 

Mrs. Fletcher Wall, Sec.-Treas *•. Lexingtorj 

Miss Hellen Tate, Y. P. Director Rt. 6, Lexingtor 



Baptist Training Union 

G. C. Lewis, Director Rt., Thomasville 

Baptist Brotherhood None 



Associa tional 
Sunday School Officers 

D. Fraley, Supt Thomasvillt 



State Institutions 

(Located within the bounds of the Association) 

Mills Home, Thomasville 

Dr. Zeno Wall, General Superintendent Thomasvill 

Dr. I. G. Greer, Chm. Board of Directors Chapel Hil 

J. D. Fraley, Treasurer Thomasvill 

Officers: Baptist Schools, State Boards and Institutions 

(Residing within the Association) 

Loyd Philpott, .Tr., Trustee Mills Home Lexingto] 

L. A. Martin, Trustee Meredith College Lexingtc 

C. C. Wall, Trustee Wake Forest College Lexingtoii 

Rev. J. A. McMillian, Editor Charity and Children Thomasvill' 

Rev. Chas. F. Leek, Member of General Board Thomasvil', 

Church Directory 

(Ordained Ministers holding Membership in the Liberty Baptist Association) 
NAME WORK CHURCH ADDRESS 

Baker, S. D Pastor South Side Thomasvill 

Baker, E. F Pastor New Friendship Rt. 5, Winston-SalerJ 

Broadway, J. V Pastor High Rock Rt. 1, Thomasvill^ 

Brooks, D. P S. W Lexington 1st Lexingtoi 

Clifford, J. Roy Pastor Lexington 1st Lexingto' 

Carroll, W.Vann Asso. Missionary Reeds Rt. 3, Lexingto 

Clark, Harvey Pastor Rich Fork Thomasvill 

Dickens, J. W Pastor Center Hill & Smith Grove Rt. 6, Lexingto 

Digh, D. W Pastor Sheets Memorial Lexingtoi 



Dunn, J.O. 



.Pastor Lake Vie\ 



Box 955, S 



penc( 



Eddinger, C. C Pastor Stoners Grove Southmoi 

Gallimore, A. R Missionary Lexington 1st Wake Foreit 

Harris, George C. .. Not Stated Erlanger Erlang<! 

Hopkins ,W. B Pastor Walters Grove China Gro\ 

Hartman, O. M Pastor Liberty & Welcome Rt. 2, Winston-Saleis 

Jarrett, J. F Teacher Center Hill Rt. 6, Lexingtd) 

Leek, Chas. F Pastor Thomasville 1st Thomasvili 

Lanning, Conrad Not Stated Churchland Rt. 1, Linwoclj 

Maier, F. A Retired Thomasville 1st Thomasvili! 

Martin, G. A Retired Thomasville 1st Thomasvili 

Mathews, M. L Retired Thomasville 1st Lexingtc] 

Matheny , C. C Pastor Erlanger Erlangi 

McGee, A. L Pastor Carolina Avenue Thomasvil 

McMillian, J. A Editor Mills Home Thomasvil 

Mitchell, B. A Pastor Abbotts Creek Rt. 1, Kernersvil 

Oldham, David Pastor Greenwood Rt. 2, HighPoi 

Philpot, Harry M Teacher Lexington 1st Gainesville, Fll 

Roach, E. C Pastor Denton 1st & Lick Creek ...Dentci 

Rhodenhiser, O. W Pastor Wallburg Wallbu 

Phillip?, V. D Pastor Union Grove... 820 Fieldale St., Winston-Sale 

Phillips, Grover C Pastor Pleasant Plains Benne| 

Teague, N. C Pastor Reeds Rt. 3, Lexingt 

Walton, J. O Pastor Mills Home Thomasvil 

Wall, Zeno Superintendent Mills Home Thomasvili 

Wilson, S. B Retired New Friendship... 1005 Franklin St., Winston 

Young, Chas Pastor Mountain View & Floyd Lexingt 



Ministeiral Students 

Baker, Furney New Friendship Church 

Brinkley, Clifton Greenwood Church 

Everhart, Bill Lexington 1st Church 

Helpler, Stewart Liberty Church 

Lanning, E.R Lexingten 1st Church 

Miller, Joe Holloways Church 



Morefield, G. C Smith Grove Chur 

Peacock, Gerthie Sheets Memorial Chur 

Teague, Nolan Reeds Chur 

Ministers Ordained This Year 

Lanning, Conrad Churchland Chur 

Yarbrough, Ray Sheets Memorial Chur 



7 



Assistants to Pastors or Educational Directors 

IBS Mary Alice Jessee Lexington 1st Lexington 

Choir Directors 

NAME CHURCH ADDRESS 

! S. Hayworth Abbotts Creek Rt. 2, High Point 

illie Gilliam Carolina Avenue Thomasville 

ade Jarret Center Hill Rt. 6, Lexington 

iggy Barnes Churchland Rt. 5, Lexington 

rs. C E. Clyatt Denton Denton 

lylor Myers E danger Erlanger 

lly Wall Floyd Rt. 6, Lexington 

W. Hansell Glennanna Thomasville 

me Listed Greenwood 

rs. Z. L. Morgan High Rock High Rock 

C. Palmer Holloways Rt. 3, Lexington 

L. Palmer Jersey Linwood 

irl Kennedy Lake View Rt. 1, Linwood 

ary Alice Jessee Lexington Lexington 

rah Wray Liberty Rt. 2, Thomasville 

ith Cole Lick Creek Rt. 1, Denton 

. B. Lord Mills Home Thomasville 

ilary Carrick Mounatin View Rt. 6, Lexington 

!en C. Jones New Friendship Rt. 6, Winston-Salem 

chard Jarrett Oak Hill Thomasville 

jxie Lail Pleasant Plains Denton 

jraer Graver Reeds Rt. 3, Lexington 

L. Byerly Reid Street Thomasville 

ilbur Lewifl Rich Fork 57 Central Ave.. High Point 

nley Carlton Sheets Memorial Lexington 

. F. Grubb ...Smith Grove Rt. 4, Salisbury 

C. Creed South Side Rt. 1, Salisbury 

rs. Pauline Warfford Stoners Grove Rt. 6, Lexington 

isie Maie Parker Summerville Rt. 1, Denton 

jne Reported Taylors Grove 

rs. Chas. F. Finch Thomasville 1st Thomasville 

sola Evans Union Grove Rt. 1, Lexington 

rs. Ben King Wallburg Wallburg 

/erett Pierce Walters Grove Rt. 2, Lexington 

L. Davis Welcome Welcome 

Messengers to Association 

BBOTTS CREEK: Mr. & Mrs. Dan S. Hayworth, Mr. & Mrs. B. A. Mitchell, Mrs. Willie 
Bodenheimer, Mr. & Mrs. S. H. Bodenheimer, Mrs. Charlie Bodenheimer, Miss Minnie Hay- 
worth, Carey J. Davis, Shirley Davis, Mrs. Jake Weavil. 

AROLINA AVENUE: Mr. & Mrs. C. R. Lanier, Rev. A. L. McGee, Mrs. Clarence Fuller. 
Caye Lanier. 

ENTER HILL: Mrs. Howard Parks, Hugh L. Miller, Mrs. J. P. Lopp, Bill Lohr, Mrs. J. W. 
Dickens, Alma Jarrett, Mr. & Mrs. J. W. Jarrett. 

HURCHLAND: Mrs. H. O. Walser, Mrs. Sidney Simerson, Mrs. R. G. Snider, Mrs. L. E. 
Rickard, Mr. & Mrs. Elgie Rickard, Mrs. R. B. Lamb, Mrs. Paul Keslsr, Mrs. H. L. Green, 
Mrs. Graham Barnes, Mrs. J. B. Beck, Mrs. Hugh McBride. Mr. & Mrs. W. H. Lomax, Mrs. 
Loyd Fitzgerald 

ENTON: Mr. & Mrs. R. C. Wall, Mr. & Mrs. H. C. Keever, Mrs. J. J. Snider, Mr. & Mrs. 
E. C. Roach, Pauline Roach, Mrs. W. C. Johnson, Mrs. O. D. Carroll, Mrs. Ben Carroll, 
Mrs. C. E. Clyatt. 

RLANGER: C. C. Matheny, Mrs. S. P. Everhart, Mrs. Theadore Koontz, Mrs. J. B. Powell. 
LOYD: Chaa. S. Young, Mrs. Geo. Wall, Lillie Wall, Mrs. Dolan Floyd, Troy Beanblossom. 
LENNANNA: K. A. Cornelison, Mrs. Laura Ingram, Mrs. Donna Jarvis, Dewey Hindon. 
LEENWOOD: Mrs. W. N. Parker, Mrs. M. I. Morton, Mrs. Maude Hoover, Mrs. Walter L. 
Byerly, Mrs. V. L. Bo6well, Jr., Mrs. Jesse Miller, Mrs. Ethel Maley, Mrs. David Oldham, 
Mrs. Eugene Pardue, Mrs. Raymoud Wagner. 

IGH ROCK: Mr. & Mrs. W. L. Bradshaw, Rev. & Mrs. B. V. Broadway, Mary Lou Brad- 
shaw, Mrs. J. H. Cameron, Mrs. J. L. Morgan. 

OLLOWAYS: Geo. C. Workman, W. G. Seaford, G. P. Palmer, Mr. & Mrs. L. C. Cross. 
2RSEY: Lee Roach, Mrs. W. L. Roach, J. N. Penninger, Mr. & Mrs. J. N. Penninger, Jr., 
W. J. Laughlin, Ray Smith. 

AKE VIEW: R. L. Young, Mr. & Mrs. F. M. Wilson, Mrs. Charles Sigmon, H. P. Leonard, 
Rev. J. O. Dunn, Mr. & Mrs. G. W. Spry. 



8 



^jJ-tfumties of the 



LEXINGTON 1st: Mr. & Mrs. E. E. Morgan, Rev. & Mrs. Roy Clifford, Mies Roxie Sheets, 
Mrs. P. M. Hendricks, P. A. Myers, H. C. Myers, Mr. & Mrs. M. R. Frank, Roland V. Long. 

LIBERTY: Mr. & Mrs. J. R. Watford, T. C. Watford, Mr. & Mrs. J. Lacie Buie, D. W. Buie, 
Wayne Buie, Lena Buie. 

LICK CREEK: Rev. E. C. Roach. 

MILLS HOME: Rev. & Mrs. J. O. Walton, Miss Salfie McCracken, Miss Viola Hester, Mae 
Belle Doughtan, J. D. Fraley. Grace M. Battle, Dr. Zerio Wall. 

MOUNTAIN VIEW: Floyd C. Watkins. Mrs. Cuther Carrick. 

NEW FRIENDSHIP: S. B. Wilson, Mrs. Glennie SwaLm, Mr. & Mrs. C. F. Motsinger, Mmj 
Allen Jones, Rev. & Mrs. E. F. Baker. 

OAK HILL: Rev. David Oldham. Mr. & Mrs. Dewey Wilson, Mrs. Frank Pearson, Mrs 
Willard Gordon. 

PLEASANT PLAINS: Mrs. Dolon Yates, Rev. & Mrs. G. C. Phillips, Mrs. Mamie Loflin. 
H. W. Hughes. 

REEDS: Rev. & Mrs. N. C. Teague, Mrs. Cavet Shoaf, E. O. Snyder, Mrs. C. F. Koontz 
Mrs. E. C. Fritts, Mr. & Mrs. A. R. Graver, Mrs. Early, Snyder, Rev. & Mrs. W. V. Carroll, 

REID STREET: Rev. F. H. xMaier, Mr. & Mrs. Lafayette Hinkle, Mr. & Mrs. J. J. Embryj 
Mrs. S. L. Cranford, Mrs. J. V. Luther. 

RICH FORK: Corene Sizemore, Hill Myers. Mrs. Stemp Everhart, A. S. Everhart, Rev. & 
Mrs. J. H. Clark. 

SHEETS MEMORIAL: Mrs. Marvin Smith, Mrs. Crawford Miller, H. V. Kinney, Charli.; 
Biesicker, Mr. & Mrs. Odis Frank, Mrs. Z. V. Fulbright, Rev. D. W. Digh, Mrs. J.J. Carrick; 
Edd Anderson, F. W. Byars, 

SMITH GROVE: Mrs. W. E. Ward, Mrs. & Mr. C. F. Sowers, Mrs. C. P. Sledge, Peggj 
Queene, Henry Smith, Mrs. R. W.Queone, Mrs. J. W. Pierce. Mrs. R. G. Orrell, G. C. Orrell 
Bob Young, Mrs. Herman Orrell, Mrs. Troy Lanning, Mr. & Mrs. Herman Grubb.Ted Doby 
Rev. J. W. Dicksns, Mr. & Mrs. G. A. Clement, Mrs. Cora Beck, Peggy Brown, Fred Church; 

SOUTH SIDE: Mrs. Sam Pierce, Mrs. W. A. Lovelace, Mrs. Ada Hill, Mrs. Grace Everhart;; 
A. B. Everhart, Henry Myers. 

SUMMER VILLE: Mrs. Shelton Surratt, Mrs. Henry Parker, Jr., Mrs. Nina Daniel, Mre 
Reuben Carrick, Mrs. L. C. Carrick, Mrs. Luther Buie. 

STONER GROVE: Rev. & Mrs. C. C. Edinger. 

TAYLOR GROVE: W. Vann Carroll. 

THOMASVILLE let: Dr. & Mrs. G. A. Martin, Mrs. Breedlove, S. B. Lowe, Rev. C. F. Leek 
UNION GROVE: Avery White, Rev, V. D. Phillips 

WALLBURG: Dumont Smith, Rev. & Mrs. O. W. Rhodenhiser, Mrs. Ben King, Mr. & Mn 
J. W. King, Mrs. Devoe Clinard, Mr. & Mrs. Maskey M, Smith. 

WALTERS GROVR: Mrs. John Yates, Mrs. Mildred Surratt, Mrs. David A. Surratt, Oci 
Callimore, Mrs, J. A. Gallimore. 

VISITORS: Mr. & Mrs. Wilson Woodcock, Jacqueline Bailey, E. J. Everhart, Dorthy Daii 
Mr. & Mrs, R. N. Honeycutt, M. H. Kendall, Ida Layne, Mrs. H. C. Myers, Mrs. Raymon 
Wilson, Mrs. H. L. Snider, Mrs. W. R. Sowers, Miss Mary C. Teague. 





"Jltnerltt baptist Association 



9 



Proceedings 

Of the ONE HUNDRED and SIXTEENTH ANNUAL MEETING 

OF THE 

^Etbertg baptist JWocmticn 

Tuesday and Wednesday, September 28-29, 1948 

HELD WITH 

jlmtili Oircfae baptist Cl]urdj 

RT. 1. LINWOOD, N. C. 

Theme: "MAGNIFYING CHRIST TO-DAY" 
FIRST DAY 

1. Tuesday September 28, 1948, at 9:45 a. m. the Liberty Association 
issembled in its One Hundred and Sixteenth Annual Session with 
he Smith Grove Baptist Church, Rt. 1, Linwood, N. C. 

2. Rev. N. C. Teague, the Moderator, called the Body to order for 
he transaction of business. 

3. The opening Devotion was conducted by Rev. Harvey Clark, Pas- 
or of Rich Fork Church. Scripture read was Collossians 1:18. 

4. Rev. J. O. Walton read the report of the program committee, 
rhe report was adopted, subject to any changes deemed advisable 
ts the meeting proceeds. 

Report of Program Committee 

TUESDAY MORNING 

9:45 Devotion Harvey Clark 

.0:00 Report of Program Committee J. 0. Walton 

0:05 Roll Call and Appointment of Committees 
0:25 Reception of Petitionary Letters 

.0:35 Report on Church Music Carey Davis 

.0:50 Address on Deaconship Conrad Motsinger 

.1:05 Report on State of Churcnes^ » A. L. Snider 

.1:25 Worship Peroid Carey Davis 

.1:35 Sermon Charles F. Leek 

2:15 Adjournment for Dinner 

TUESDAY AFTERNOON 

1:30 Devotion B. V. Broadway 

1:45 Report on Christian Educatian J. Roy Clifford 

2:25 Report on Training Union James Honeycutt 

2:50 Orphanage *_ J. O. Walton 

3:15 State Missions G. W. Miller 

Address: M. A. Huggins 
4:00 Adjournment 

WEDNESDAY MORNING 

9:45 Devotion J. V. Dunn 

10:00 Sunday Schools Odis Frank 

1.0:20 Report of Committees 
10:45 Song 

10:50 Associational Missionary W. Vann Carroll 

LI :05 Baptist Hospital. Roland V. Long 

11:30 Christian Literature B. A. Mitchell 

U:50 Woman's Missionary Union Mrs. P. M. Hendricks 

12:15 Adjournment for Dinner. 



10 



^iHirattes of iije 



WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON 

1:30 Devotion Vann Philips 

1:45 Public Morals E. F. Baker! 

2:05 Relief and Annuities Dan S. Hayworth' 

2:15 American Bible Society Miss Roxie Sheets' 

2:25 Home Missions Miss Katherine Feezori 

2:30 Miscellaneous Business 

2:45 Foreign Missions C. C. Eddinger 

2:50 Address J. C. Canipe 

3:35 Adjournment 

J. O. Walton, Program Chairman 
N. C. Teague, Moderator 

5. Roll was called by A. L. Snider, Clerk. All Churches were ac- 
counted for during the Association. 

6. Appointment of Committees was read at this time. 

7. Call for petitionary letters was made. High Rock and Glennanna 
made application for admission into th Association. 

8. Hymn, "There is a Fountain Filled With Blood." 

9. The following report was prepared and presented by Bro. Carey 
Davis of Abbotts Creek Church. The report was adopted. 

Report on Church Music 

Music is one of the great spiritual possessions of the human race. It has 
been called the language of the emotions and the universal language, yet 
almost every individual has his own definition of music, expressed in terms 
of what music means to him, because music is a personal thing. Some 
might say it is the expression of thought and emotions by means of 
RHYTHMICAL an harmonious sound. 

Music is more extensively employed in the church service today than ever 
before. Approximately one-third of the worship period consists of music. 
Yet some look upon Church Music as something to fill in, or to bring folk 
to the church. Music provides an important means of spiritual impression 
of expression and is a great factor in attracting the people and giving them 
a means of united worship, prayer and praise. When properly presented, 
music can vitalize and enrich the entire church. 

"Some weaknesses of Church Music" — It is easy enough to point outi 
the weaknesses of our church music. What we need most is to suggest 
methods whereby to strengthen the musical part of our church music, the 
answer is that fearlessly and honestly facing what seems to be our most out- 
standing weaknesses. We will be able to plan, pray and by persistent and 
constant effort overcome them. 

THE CHOIR DIRECTOR— First of all a director must believe in tM 
missions of music, not only as an art form, but also as a means of worship. 
He must be in sympathy with the work the church is trying to do. A direc-j 
tor who thinks of church music, only as music, will soon have his choir pre- 
senting the service as a form of concert. This leads to self-glorifications, and 
a desire to have people say, "doesn't that choir sing marvelously." The 
director who thinks of music as a form of worship is most happy when the 
people say "that music brought me close to God." 

VALUE of CONGREGATIONAL SINGING— Great congregational 
singing does more to create the spirit of worship than any other form 
of church music. It provides a means of expression for all, and gives voice 



/ 



fiibevty baptist ^generation 



11 



o those deep experiences in spiritual things which enrich the lives of those 
hat take part. 

A singing church is a winning church. A congregation that is too lazy 

sing, is too lazy to win souls. Let all the people sing. "Sing aloud unto 
rod our strength, make a joyful noise unto the God of Jacob." Psalm 81:1. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Carey J. Davis 

9a. A Sextet from Hasty School sang, "Softly and Tenderly Jesus is 
filing." 

Deacosiship 

10. This report was prepared and presented by Bro. Conrad Mot sin - 
er, a Deacon from New Friendship Church. No written report on this. 
10a. Pastors present 20, (New Pastors 6), Deacons 25. 

11. The following report was prepared and presented by A. L. Snider, 
Uerk of the Association, from Denton Church. 

State of Churches 

The reports sent in by the Churches of Liberty Association this year 
idicate a year of achievements to be proud of; especially in a financial way. 
'hen too, it gives us a general idea of the work accomplished by the differ- 
nt organizations. 

There are 14 churches having no Training Union. Enrolled in Train- 
lg Union are 1,227; 3 more pupils and two more Unions than last year. 

W. M. U. has 129 units against 114 reported last year; a gain of 15, 
rith an enrollment of 2,154, a gain of 138 over last year. 

Sunday School enrollment this year is 7,830, or 82 less than last year, 
"he Sunday School attendance is 10 less than our previous report, which 
5 probably caused by the Polio epedemic. 10 churches report a loss in en- 
ollment; these losses are in the Nursery, Beginners, Junior, and Extension 
)epartments. 26 churches have an enrollment in Sunday School greater 
han their Church membership; a gain of 1 over last year, leaving 19 
hurches whose Sunday School enrollment is less than its membership. 

There are now 22 churches having preaching every Sunday — a gain of 
last year. 7 churches report no revivals, 8 report no baptisms, 3 report no 
.dditions. 28 churches report a total of 45 revivals. 

Oar churches had a total of 379 baptisms and deductig our losses, we 
ad a gain of 69; making a net gain of 448, or 89 less than last year. One 
hurch only gave more for missions than for local work — Mills Home. 

Gifts for Local Causes $222,471.00 gain $18,356.45 

" Missions 56,285.11_ ____gain 10,245.81 

" Orphanage 9,810.03 gain 487.56 

The Orphanage gains over last year is $722.19. We have reported this 
'ear a total gain of $71,767.66, or grand total of $271,921.80, the greatest 
inancial report ever made by oiir Association. Yet there are only 18 
lurches which have made a pledge for our Associational Missionary, but 
heir pledges do not amount to half enough to carry on this important work, 
phe remainder has been paid by the State Board. 18 churches have paid 
heir pledges in full for the year; 9 have paid in part, and 8 nothing. This 
tear we have a total of 27 churches which have sent an average of 5^ per 
bember for Minute Fund and Associational expenses, while there were only 

1 which responded in a like manner last year. 



12 



(JtHtmites of tlje 



While our Association has gained many thousands financially this year,ji 
we have been very limited in winning souls for Christ. According to your 
letters this year, it has taken more than 22 people to win 1 soul to Christ. 

Is not this a challenge to every Baptist in our Liberty Association tc 
wake up and do something for Christ. 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. L. Snider 

12. The following report was brought by Bro. S. B. Lewis, of Firsi\ 
Church, Thomasville. This report was adopted. 

Report of Treasurer 



Balance on hand September, 1948 $ 89.81 

Minute fund paid in last year 323.19 

Total Received $413.00 

DISBURSEMENTS 

Printing Minutes (1,100) $205.00 

Printing 4-page Programs (500) 12.50 

Printing Messenger Slips (2,000) 7.50 

Printing Envelopes (500) 6.45 

Paper for Statistical Tables, etc 2.25 

Stencils .75 

Cutting Stencils and running Statistics 2.00 

Postage 10.88 

Telephone .72 

Typing 12.00 

Clerk-Treasurer 75.00 

Total Expenses for the year $335.33 

Balance in Treasury, September, 1948 77.67 

Respectfully, $413.00 
A. L. Snider 



13. A message in song was presented at this time by the Sextet frorll 
Hasty High School: led by Bro. Carey Davis of Abbotts Creek ChurcM 

14. The Annual Sermon was brought by Rev. Chas. F. Leek, Paste 
First Baptist Church, Thomasville. Scripture used as basis for Mes 
sage taken from book of Esther. Challenge of the day, "Think no 
that thou might escape from the King's House." 

Benediction by Rev. Chas. F. Leek. 

Adjourned for the noon hour at 12:35 p.m. to reassemble at 1:3k 
TUESDAY AFTERNOON 

15. Meeting opened by singing, "How Firm a Foundation." 

The Devotion was conducted by Rev. B. V. Broadway , Pastor Hig\ 
Rock and Glennanna Churches. Scripture used for text, Psalms 12t. 
Prayer by Rev. A. L. McGee. 

16. Bro. Henry Smith, 97 year sold, was introduced to the Associatioj 
as its oldest member, and as the man who was instrumental in th 
founding of Smith Grove Baptist Church. 

17. The following report was prepared and presented by Rev. J. Ro% 
Clifford, Pastor, First Church, Lexington. This report was discussm 
by Brethren Claud Gaddy of Raleigh, M. H. Kendall of Mars Hffl 
and Horace Easom of Shelby.. The report was adopted. 

Christian Education 

North Carolina Baptists are in the van in their sponsorship of Christi*! 
education in the Southern Baptist Convention. Support in the amount I 

I 



^CihsritJ baptist (Association 



13 



184,000.00 was granted the six colleges in 1947-48. Wake Forest, Mars 
ill, Campbell, Meredith, and Gardner-Webb enrolled more than 5,000 
udents during the past scholastic year. Of this total about 500 students 
e preparing themselves for full time Christian service. 

In the South at large— in all Baptist schools— a grand total of 5,783 
inisterial students and 2,196 other volunteers for a Christian ministry are 
ported. Thus it will be seen that North Carolina, without a seminary or 
•ecial training school within her boundaries, is preparing more than her 
are of these Kingdom workers. Its hould be noted here that during the 
ist 12 months our Baptist schools have received thru Baptist State Con- 
•ntions $2,830,296.30;and from outside gifts $3,532,219.52. Christian ed- 
ition is a very large aspect of our total denominational program. 

Trained leadership is second only to an obedient, Bible-believing church 
embership in its importance as afactor in Kingdom progress. Every church, 
)wever small, ought to see its responsibility in the development of such a 
ained force. The overwhelming percentage of support that Baptist schools 
ceive from North Carolina Baptists come from the Co-operative Program. 
2t each church then, strive to enlarge its giving to this united, total 
ingdom Program. 

What, may we ask, have the colleges a right to expect of the churches? 
tnancial support, of course. Even more important is it that the churches 
id their leaders encourage young people to select Baptist schools for their 
dlege preparation. In North Carolina, approximately one-half of all Bap- 
st students are enrolled in non-Baptist institutions. Our colleges also have 
ie right to expect the churches to send them young people who are sound 
the faith. The churches must also maintain and extend a spiritual cli- 
ate in which true Christian scholarship may flurish. 

What have the churches a right to expect of the schools? First and 
remost, that the collegiate atmosphere shall encourage and strengthen the 
ew Testament concept of the Christian Faith and shall confirm the 
udents in this faith. Second, that students preparing for service in fields 
;her than the specifically Christian, shall also be trained as Christian 
aders. Third, that collegians shall be strengthened in their loyalty 
> the Baptist cause. The colleges have a unique opportunity to acquaint 
leir students with state and Southwide Baptist leadership and work, 
he churches surely have the right to expect that those who accept their 
lpport shall not weaken or undermine the very cause they were created to 
lpport and extend. 

Let the goal of the churches during year be — every church supporting 
hristian Education thru the Co-operative Program to the fullest extent of 
s ability. Respectfully submitted, 

J. Roy Clifford 

18. The following report was prepared and presented by Bro. James 
r oneycutt of Mills Home Church. It was discussed by Bro. Honey- 
utt and adopted. 

Training Union Report 

The Liberty Baptist Training Union began its year's work with an 
fficers Training Clinic in Lexington. Rev. Vann Carroll, our Associational 
Missionary was teacher. This Clinic was well attended and very helpful. 



14 



^iHftimtles of tfye 



The first regular Mass meeting was held the 3rd Sunday in March ai| 
Mills Home Church. At this meeting the elimination contests were held for 
the Junior Memory Work, Intermediate Sword Drill, Young People's Bet| 
ter Speakers Tournament, and the Adult Scripture Reading. There were nq 
representatives in the Hymn Festival. The winners of the various contests ! 
participated in the Regional Finals at Ashhoro and were all eliminated 
Liberty was not represented at Fruitland in the State Finals. 

At Greenwood Church in Thomasville, 3rd Sunday in June, the regular 
quarterly meeting was held. The attendance was small but departmental 
conferences were conducted and all present enjoyed this meeting. Only [\ 
churches were represented. At this meeting a nominating committe waJ 
appointed to secure a slate of officers for the year 1948-49. 

The final meeting for the year was held Sunday, Sept. 26, at LexingtorJ 
1st church. The attendance at this meeting was also rather small but seemed 
enthusiastic about Training Union work. An inspirational message waiJ 
brought by Dr. Russell P. Harris of Thomasville. This message was enjoy I 
ed by all attending. The nominating committee made its report and th<j 
following officers were recommended for the new year: 

General Director G. C. Lewis New Friendship 

Associate Director To be named later 

Secretary-Treasurer Miss Ruth Teague 

Assistant Sec.-Treas Miss Hazel Frady Lexington 1st 

Chorister Carey Davis Abbotts Creek 

Pionist To be named later 

Pastor Advisor Rev. B. A. Mitchell Abbotts Creek 

Adult Leader M. F. Brown New Friendship 

Young People's Leader Eugene Smith Oak Hill 

Intermediate Leader Miss Troy Jarret Center Hill 

Junior Leader Mrs. Holland Burton Reid Street 

Story Hour Leader Mrs. Ben E. King Wallburg 

Group 1, Leader W. H. Lomax Churchland 

Group 2, Leader Mrs. Ben Carroll Denton 1st I 

Group 3, Leader To be named later 

According to reports sent in to the General Director there are 91 activj 
Training Unions in 19 churches. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Jas. H. Honeycutt, Asso. Director 

19. The following report was prepared and presented by Rev. J. Q 
Walton, Pastor of Mills Home Church. This was discussed by Brc 
J. D. Fraley, Mills Home Treasurer. This report was adopted. 

Baptist Orphanage Report 

The Orphanage is now taking care of 645 children. They are in thre 
groups, namely: At Mills Home, 397; At Kenneday Home, 143; In boarc 
ing homes, 55; In Mother's Aid, 40. There are approximately 150 employee 
engaged in our program of training and work. During the past year muc 
extra money has been spent on the renovation of many buildings. Also 
number of new buildings have been put up — a cold storage plant at eac 
place, a barn at Kennedy Home, a dwelling and carpenter shop at Mills Horn* 

This business of rearing orphan children is a most expensive one. T 
get a pretty good idea of the expense in taking care of the above numbe: 
just survey your own home. Say you have four children, and make a rathe 
good salary. These children first and last will cost you just about the SUI 
TOTAL of your income year after year! And it is even more expensive t 



fiibetty ^Baptist JWoriaiton 



15 



ar children when it is done by hired employees. 

In the Orphanage, all children large enough have certain assignments. 
r ith the larger ones much benefit is derived, but with many of the younger 
les, it is extra work for the foreman. The mother knows how much easier 
is to do the work than to teach the child to do it. But for the sake of the 
lild, she teaches him to do it. Just so with some in our working program, 
ur heavy work program does not pay in dollars and cents like many may 
>lieve, or like it may sound in reports, but it does have untold value from 
ie standpoint of training the child, and of course, actual cash value too. 

The children are brought to the Home upon thorough investigation by 
lr case workers. They are given excellent lodging, foods, clothing, work, 
creation, etc. They are kept until it is deemed wise to release them, or 
itil they have received four years of high school training. When they 
ave at the end of high school we secure for them the best suitable jobs 
>ssible. If they care to further pursue their training, we give them all the 
icouragement possible. Offtimes a person, a church, a class, etc. 
ill choose a child and sponsor his further education. But there is but lit- 
e finacial aid that the Orphanage can give the child after final dismisal. 

You can best help the work of the Orphanage by sending produce of 
ly kind, by your Sunday School making a monthly offering, and by the 
hole church making a Thanksgiving offering annually. 

You are invited to join the hundreds who visit the Orphanage on pie- 
ces and various other occasions. 

Sincerely, 
J. O. Walton 

10. At this time the Congregation was led by Rev. Horace Easom 
1 singing "Leaning on the Everlasting Arms." 

11. The report on Resolutions was presented by Bro. J. D. Fraley of 
fills Home. 

Report of Committee on Resolutions 

1. The Committee for itself and for the Liberty Baptist Association extend 
) the Smith Grove Baptist Church its deep appreciation and grateful thanks 
>r the kind hospitality during the 116th Annual Session of the Association, 
he people of Smith Grove are to be commended on their church building 
ad the generosity of all their good people. 

2. For itself and for the Association : the Committee expresses sincere ap- 
reciation for the tireless efforts of our Moderator and Clerk in the work of 
ie Association. The work of all other officers is hereby commended and 
ppreciation of their services to the Association is hereby expressed. 

3. The Committee for itself and for the Association takes this opportunity 
t expressing thanks for the work of Bro. W. V. Carroll, Associational Mis- 
onary, and commend him to all churches of the Association. 

4. The Committee heartily endorses a resolution of the Wallburg Baptist 
ihurch as passed in its regular business meeting, Sept. 12, 1948, and pre- 
fnted to the Committee. A copy of the resolution is attached hereto. 
|he Committee recommends the adoption of the resolution and suggests 
kat the Clerk be authorized to send copies of the resolution to the Baptist 
pate Convention at its next Annual Meeting to be held in Charlotte, N C, 



IB 



^iHtmttcB of % 



beginning on November 16, 1948, and to the Board of Trustees of Wak< 
Forest College, Wake Forest, N. C. 

Respectfully submitted, 
J. D. Fraley, Chm., Mrs. Lillie Surratt, 
W. W. Brinkley, M. C. Haislip, 
Otis Bean, K. C. Lambeth 

A PETITION FROM WALLBURG BAPTIST CHURCH 
TO THE LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

(As attached to Resolution Committee report and adopted by Association) 

WHEREAS, it has been brought to our attention that the plans for th< 
new Wake Forest College call for putting the chapel off to the side in conj 
nection with the School of Religion rather than in a symbolically centra 
place; and in view of the fact that the Christian religion is the mother o 
modern education, and in view of the fact that the new Wake Forest Col 
lege should be a center of the Christian interpretation of life for all our peo 
pie, not merely for the theological students, we believe it of the greates 
importance that it have a place that shall be symbolically central in th 
architecture, and that it be a building that is second to none in beauty an< 
dignity. We feel that although it may be of importance whether the arch 
itecture is traditional or modern, as the present controversy is debating, wi 
consider it nothing less than imperative that it express a Christian ide'i 
rather than the current secular and pagan concept of education and lifj 
which makes religion a side issue instead of the center of life: 

THEREFORE, we the congregation of Wallburg Baptist Church, hereb; 
petition the Liberty Baptist Association to pass the following resolutions 

FIRST, a resolution urgently requesting the Building Committee anl 
Board of Trustees of Wake Forest College to plan to place the chapel of th 
new college in a place that is symbolically central, and to make it a build 
ing that is second to none in beauty and dignity: 

SECOND, a resolution requesting the State Convention to consider thifl 
critical issue and also to pass a similar resolution addressed to the Buildim 
Committee and Board of Trustees of Wake Forest College urging that the 
make the new chapel symbolically on the campus and second to no othc 
building in beauty and dignity. 

This petition to the Liberty Baptist Association was unanimousl 
adopted by Wallburg Baptist Church in regular Conference, Sept. 12, 194* 
0. W. Rhodenhiser, Pastor-Moderator 

22. Report on State Missions was prepared by Bro. G. W. Miller c 
Lexington 1st Church. It was adoped unread to allow more time fc 
address by Bro. M. A. Huggins, State Secretary . He was presented I 
Rev. Chas. F. Leek, Pastor of Thomasville 1st Church. 

Bro. Muggins discussed the Baptist Program of North Carolim 
Adjourned 4:10 p. m. — Benediction by Rev. Vann Carroll. 

Report ©n State iVBissions 

The State Mission Board is the tree on which the Baptist fruit of. Nort 
Carolina grows. This tree is little more than a century old. It is som< 
what like the tree planted by the rivers of water, that bringeth forth h: 
fruit in his season; his leaf also shall not wither; and what-so-ever 1 
doeth shall prosper. (Psalms 1:3) 



17 



State Missions is the carrying out of the great commission of our Lord 
i this state, to give the gospel to our own people, and teach them to ob- 
»rve "all things what-so-ever He has commanded us." As we contemplate 
le task of enlisting and teaching our people to observe the commands of 
esus, the fields appear large and "white unto harvest." 

Let it be said again, that the Baptists of this state, are what they are 
}day, because they have pursued a fairly aggressive State Mission program, 
.lmost all the churches of this state have been aided either directly or in- 
irectly. This tree has contributed some of its fruits to our colleges and 
enevolent institutions. It now spends yearly upwards to about $45,000.00, 
n Missionary pastors salaries. This has proven a great asset to the Board, 
'he churches, as they have grown and developed, have in turn, contributed 
berally and cheerfully to the growth and enrichment of the State Mission 
ioard. This tree has sent its tap root deep into the soil of the state, and has 
rown many new branches that have spread from the north to the south, 
nd from the east to the west over North Carolina. At the present time it 
i giving its attention to the training of the ministry of the state. 

The branch of the department of visual education has been added, and 
mch is being done for the developement of our rural churches. 

The Board continues its policy of purchasing lots for new churches, 
r here they are much needed. The sum of $10,609.91 was spent by the State 
!oard to assist weak churches in one year ending Sept. 30, 1947. Much 
'ork has been done lately by the Board in Eastern N. C. among the Indians. 

The branches of this tree are too numerous to discuss at length in this 
sport, but we mention some of them: 1. Three general missionaries, who 
ssist the General Secretary in the promotion of all work of the Convention. 
. The Board aids Negro Baptists within the state with some financial help. 
. A visitation program for the Veterans Hospital at Oteen, and in the 
anatorium at Montrose, Black Mountain and Samracan. 4. Provides help 
)r Associational Missionaries. 5. The Board shares in the salaries of four City 
lissions. Then we have the branch of Christian Education. Tnis includes 
he Sunday School, Training Union, and Student divisions. 

A young and tender branch of particular interest, is an enlarged work 
i the churches by about 100 fine young people from our colleges, holding 
raining schools for our boys and girls. Then last but not least is the work 
f Bro. Huggins, our Secretary, and some help to the Allied Church League. 

Let me say in concluding this report, that the leaves of this tree will not 
zither, but will remain green the year 'round for the "healing of the nations." 
Respectfully submitted, 
G. W. Miller 

WEDNESDAY MORNING - SECOND DAY 

23. Rev. E. C. Roach was in charge of Devotion and song service. The 
ong used was "Stand Up for Jesus." Rev. J. V. Dunn, Pastor of Lake 
r iew Church, conducted the Devotion, useing Scripture, Philippxans 2. 

24. Song, "At the Cross," led by Bro. Carey Davis. 

25. The Sunday School report was prepared and presented by Bro. 
pdis Frank of Sheets Memorial Church. The report was adopted. 

Report on Sunday School 

Paul in writing to Timothy, his son in the ministry, laid down the re- 
tirement for a pastor. Among these we find he is to be one "apt to teach." 



18 



,Jftfltmties of the 



In 2nd Timothy (4-5) the exhoratitm is given to "do the work of an 
evangelist" with the Bible as a text book and a teacher enlightened by thel 
Holy Spirit. When Jesus said, "Lift up your eyes and look on the fields for| 
they are white already to harvest," he might easily have been speaking of] 
the Baptists, their Churches and Sunday Schools in this State and in this] 
Association. One of the most inviting and promising fields of evangelism! 
in the world exists in the Sunday School. 

Consider what could be accomplished during the next 12 months by, 
26,000 Southern Baptist Churches if each Sunday School Superintendent 1 
and Pastor would urge that the Sunday School work be keyed to the win- 
ning the lost to Christ. It is the primal purpose of the triune God in the,, 
world. "For the Son of man is come to seek and save that which was lost."! 
It is the primal task of the people of God. "As my Father hath sent me,, 
even so send I you." (John 20:21) 

During the month of February we had eleven teams which was sup- 
posed to have visited every church in the Liberty Association for Church' 
planning meetings. These teams were headed by eleven pastors of the Asso- 
ciation. Dae to the very inclimate weather in February, not all these meet- 
ings were held, and there was no report sent in from some that were held ji 
The reports sent in shows that 20. churches were visited, but at two of thesefj 
no one was present. There were 211 officers and teachers who attended tfll 
meetings and 435 total attendance. These churches who were visited com-lj 
mitted themselves to 17 new classes, 11 new departments, 2 new Sunday! 
schools, 17 vacation Bible schools, and 17 training schools. In addition t(|] 
this, 13 churches promised to engage in an enlargement campaign, and 11 j 
said they had planned to improve their buildings. If any worthy advanceiijJ 
are attained in the Association this year, preparation must be made now. 
Respectfully submitted, 
Odis Frank 
REPORT OF COMMITTEES 

26. Reception of Churches — Motion by Carolina Avenue Church tha>A 
both High Rock and Glennanna be received into the Association all 
full fledged Churches. 

We, the committee on the reception of new churches, certify that will 
have examined the church covenant, the articles of faith, the denomination^ I 
program, and the literature used in High Rock Mission and Glennanna Misjj 
sion. We find the credentials satisfactory. 

The committee, therefore, recommends that the High Rock Mission an»| j 
Glennanna Mission, each, be received by the Liberty Baptist Association a| I 
a sister church. Signed: J. W. Dickens, Chm. 

C. F. Motsinger, J. O. Walton, B. A. Mitchell 

27. Report on time, place, and preacher was made by Rev. J. Ro\ J 
Clifford. Report was adopted. 

TIME— Tuesday and Wednesday after 4th Sunday in September, 194JB 
PLACE— Sheets Memorial Baptist Church. 

PREACHER— Rev. J. O. Walton. Alternate, Rev. C. C. Matheny. 
Committee: J. Roy Clifford, 
R. C. Wall, E. A. Snider 

28. Report of Executive Committee was made by Rev. N. C. Teagmlm 
while J. O. Walton presided. This report was adopted. 



J&xbtrtyt J^apttst (Association 



19 



Report of Executive Committee 

Your committee has met three times during the year. In each of these 
meetings matters concerning the promotion of our missionary work in the 
county were discussed and acted upon. In addition, we wish to recommend 
to the association these matters: 

First, we recommend that the standing resolutions on the reception of 
new churches and the ordination of new ministers be revised. To do this 
we recommend that these resolutions be re-studied by a committee and that 
action be taken at our next associational meeting. 

Second, we recommend that the association elect 3 trustees to handle 
business and legal matters of the asoociation; that they be elected for 2, 4, 
and 6 years respectively on a rotating system and not eligible for re-election 
for 2 years after expiration of term of office; that after this election the 
trustees shall be elected and serve for a period of 6 years. We recommend 
to this body for our first trustees: for 6 years, Judge Hubert E. Olive; for 
i years, Bro. A. L. Snider; and for 2 years, Bro. Dan S. Hayworth. 
N. C. Teagne, Moderator 
A. L. Snider, Clerk 

29. Report of the Finance Committee was presented by Bro. S. B. 
Laws, Thomasville 1st Church. Report deferred to an afternoon hour. 

30. Bro. Zeno Wall made a short talk at this time. 

31. Song, "When I Survey the Wonderous Cross," led by Bro. Davis 

32. The Associational Missionary report was prepared and brought 
by Rev. Vann Carroll, Associational Missionary. Report adopted. 

Associational Missionary Report 

Your missionary moved into the Association the 2nd week in Decem- 
ber, so this report is hardly 10 months of work. But here are some things 
he has done: 

Helped ordain deacons in 6 churches; helped ordain 2 preachers; con- 
ducted 3 prayer meetings; taught 23 Sunday school lessons; held 2 revivals; 
preached 65 times; helped in 3 vacation Bible schools; taught 14 study 
courses including W. M. U., S. S. and B. T. U., making 45 or more evenings 
of classes; made 14 addresses; gave 1 B. A. U. program in 55 or more in- 
dividual, group, and committee conferences; presided at 5 meetings; helped 
take census in 2 churches; helped visit for 2 revivals; attended 3 Associa- 
tional S. S. meetings; helped in S. S. enlargement campaign in Chowan Asso. 

Attended the State Evangelistic Conference in Raleigh, the State Vaca- 
tion Bible School Clinic in Salisbury, the state W. M. U. Convention in 
Greensboro, the Southern Baptist Convention in Memphis, part of the 
Leadership Assembly at Ridgecrest, and the State S. S. Planning meeting 
in High Point; mailed around 2,000 letters and cards; published 140 Asso- 
ciational Calenders at the first of the year; also published 675 bulletins; and 
raveled almost 7,000 miles. 

One Youth Revival and two Vacation Bible Schools Were canceled 
ecause of the polio ban. 

1. Churches, why not send the 'Baptist Student' magazine to your boys 
and girls in college, and put a few in your church library for young people. 
I 2. It will be a privilege in about six weeks to have teams come into our 
churches and help us make Sunday School plans for another year. 

I 



jJHtrattee of ifye 



3. Oar Association's part of the $200,000.00 State Mission offering this and, 
next month is about $4,536.00. This means we tripple last year's offering^ 

4. Lets have at least one Sunday School Training course this fall and at 
least one for the Training Union. 

Oct. 13. W. M. U. Divisional meeting at 1st Church, Salisbury. 
Oct. 17. Associational Y. P. Rally 2:45 at 1st Church, Thomasville. 
Oct. 28. Community Missions and Mission Study Institute. 
Oct. 31. Associational Sunday School meeting. 

Nov. 4- Annual Associational B.T.U. Officers Clinic, 10 a.m., High Point! 

Nov. 5-6. R. A. and G. A. Counselors' Conclave, opening 4:30 p.m. on 5trl 
and closing at noon on 6th at Salisbury. 

Nov. 11-12. W. M.U. Executive Council meeting, Raleigh. 

Nov. 16-18. Baptist State Convention, 1st Church, Charlotte 

Nov. 29-Dec.8. Week of Prayer and Lottie Moon Christmas Offering. 

Dec. 6. Southern Baptists Simultaneous Associational B.T.U. meetings! 

Dec. 25. CHRISTMAS 
33. The report on Baptist Hospital was prepared and presentod b)t 
Dr. Roland C. Wall, 1st Church, Lexington. It was discussed by Dr\ 
Long and Rev. O. W. Rhodenhiser of Wallburg Church. Report adoptedm 

Report on Baptist Hospital of N. C. 

Our North Carolina Baptist Hospital at Winston-Salem ministers t ] 
the sick from all parts of our state. It is our Good Samaritan, in the nam J 
of the Great Physician, to those who suffer and do not have sufficient mortal 
to pay the large cost of the best medical care. 

From among those of limited means 26,000 visits were made to the Out! 
Patient Department for examination, diagnosis and treatment last yeaii 
There will be 35,000 visits this year. This is one of the most important 
services of our Hospital and it is being enlarged as rapidly as possible. 

Of this large number coming to the Out-Patient Department, there il 
room for only about one-fourth of them to be treated in the Hospital as bed 
patients. Money is now being raised from interested friends and business 1 
build a new enlarged Hospital. This will be located on a beautiful 100 acrj 
tract in Winston-Salem which has been given for this purpose. It is hope**; 
that the money needed for the enlargement will come speedily so that spac 
may be provided for the many sick people for whom there is now no roorrti 

As the services of our Hospital have grown, the Mother's Day offerinfj 
from our churches have likewise grown. These offerings are all used to heljl 
pay; the cost of caring for those who receive this ministry and do not hav 
the money to pay the total cost themselves. In order to provide such hell 
for as many as possible, our Hospital adds to the Mother's Day offerings a 
the funds it can get for this purpose from the welfare agencies from the stat 
and counties, the Duke Endowment, contributions from individuals, am 
many other available eources. The calls for help are far beyond the mean 
of our Hospital to supply, however. We hope the Mother's Day offerin! 
will continue to grow in our churches in order that our Hospital may pr< 
vide more service for more people. 

Our Baptist Hospital and Bowman Gray School of Medicine of Wal 
Forest College provide training for young women and young men who a) 
called into the fields of nursing and medicine. With all the facilities avai 



21 



ble in a great hospital and medical school such as we have, there is offered 
quality of training not generally available. A number of those now in 
•aining there are preparing for medical mission work. We urge fine young 
ten and women from our Baptist Churches who are interested in these im- 
ortant fields of service to consider going here for their training. 

Our Baptist Hospital maintains a Department of Religion. This pro- 
ides a chaplain service for the patients, especially for those of particular 
airitual needs. It provides a religious program among the students, seek- 
lg to help establish Christian faith and promote spiritual growth. It offers 
9urses in pastoral counselling for pastors and ministerial students designed 
3 prepare the pastor better to minister to his people in their personal needs 
nd problems. This department serves as a link between our hospital and 
ur churches when we have needs and problems in relation to the hospital. 

North Carolina Baptists have developed an outstanding medical center, 
b is for its ministry to those with little money that we appeal to the 
hurches of our Associations to give generously on Mother's Day. 

34. Report on Christian Literature was prepared and presented by 
lev. B. A. Mitchell, Pastor Abbotts Creek Church. It was discussed 
y Bro. Wilson Woodcock of Greensboro. Report was adopted. 

Report on Christian Literature 

Of reading material there is no end, but all of this material is not help- 
il in training a Christian people. In fact, a great deal of the easily avail- 
ble reading matter is definitely harmful to the Christian cause. 

It is imperative in this reading age that our people be given suitable 
terature on the Christian concept. We confine the report on Christian 
terature to that regularly offered to our people by our own denomination 
nd not including everything that may be written on the subject. We 
horoughly believe that the denomination offers to its people a literature 
lassed with the best, and excelled by none. 

The Foreign Mission Board publishes the COMMISSION for only 50^ 
ter year, which gives a good cross section on foreign mission matters, thru 
zhich we may be well informed. The Home Mission Board offers HOME 
MISSIONS, which serves the home mission cause and the people in the 
ame manner as does the foreign mission magazine. 

The Woman's Missionary Union publishes ROYAL SERVICE, The 
WINDOW, WORLD COMRADES, and AMBASSADOR LIFE. 
| The Sunday School Board supplies our Sunday Schools and Training 
'Jnions with all their needs, publishes many good books, and supplies many 
Incidental needs. Anew magazine, HOME LIFE, is a magazine of distinc- 
tion, and an asset to every Christian home. 

? The BIBLICAL RECORDER, organ of the Baptist State Convention, 
lias made great strides in recent years, as under the club plan, subscrip- 
fons have climbed into the vicinity of 50,000. 

| The Baptist Orphanage offers CHARITY and CHILDREN, a cherished 
■aperin our Sunday Schools throughout the state — Circulation near 40,000. 

The hub about which all the above mentioned takes its place, is our 
ftible. It is the source book, and the inspiration for ail the rest of our 
ublished helps. 

A home may be Christian without having all the items in this listing, 



zz 



tMiimxtez of t\\t 



but each one added makes the home defintely more rich, and each one sub 
tracted makes the home definitely poorer. 

We heartily commend our Baptist publications to our people and urgt 
that the people receive them into their homes and read them loyally. 
Respectfully submitted, 

B. A! Mitchell 

35. Music rendered and visitors recognized at this time. 

36. The report on W. M. U. was prepared and presented by Mrs. P. M 
Hendricks. It was also discussed by Mrs. Hendricks, and adopted. 

W. M. U. Report 

The saying that "woman's work is never done," may be aptly appliec 
to Woman's Missionary Union. Each year brings new challenges, new op 
portunities, higher aims and ideals. 

That Liberty W. M. U. did a good part in meeting these in 1947 i 
evident in that we maintained an A-l rating for the year. This was mad* 
possible thru the work and efforts of consecrated associational officers an< 
local leaders. Much of our success was due to the efficient leadership o' 
Miss Beatrice Council as she directed our Young People's organizations 
The young people went over both their financial goals and number of nev 
auxiliaries required. We regretfully gave up Miss Council as she move.: 
away, but are happy to have Miss Helen Tate carry on most capably. 

Special mention is here made of New Friendship, fully graded, on itj 
A-l rating for the 14th consecutive year. Greenwood was A-l its first yeai 
of organization. Union Grove, Hollow ays and Mills Home secured a gifl 
to missions from every resident woman member. 

Leadership conferences, visits from a field representative, Communitj 
Missions and Mission Study Institutes, one day camps for Junior Auxil:! 
aries, and a Young People's Rally were highlights of the year. In additio 
the women gave, as a Community Mission project, Bibles for all the bed 
in Lexington Memorial and Thomasville Hospitals. 



The 1947 gifts through special offerings were: 

Annie Armstrong Home Mission Offering $ 836.13 

Heck- Jones Memorial Offering 581.81 

State Mission Offering 715.32 

Lottie Moon Foreign Mission Offering 2,301.01 

Total $4,434.27 

Gifts to Co-operative Program 8,568.79 

Gifts to World Relief 287.25 

Gifts to Other Objects 3,179.24 

Total $12,035.28 

GRAND TOTAL $16,469.55 



The latter part of 1947, definite objectives and goals were set up as a 
tainments for our 60th anniversary, which is designated as our Commenf 
oration year. How we will have proved ourselves in this remains to be seei 
but through the above report we feel that we have made a few steps fo ! 
ward as we have "labored together with God." 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mrs. P. M. Hendricks 
Benediction by Dr. Zeno Wall. 

Adjournment for noon-hour at 12:15 p. m. to reconvene at l:3i 



JQtberiu ^Baptist JVssoriaium 



23 



WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON 

37. The Association was called to order at 1:30 p. m. by Moderator. 

38. Song: "Come Thou Fountain." 

39. Devotion by Rev. Vann Phillips, Pastor Union Grove Church, 
Scripture used, Numbers 20:1-12. Subject, "Make God Holy." 

40. Report on Public Morals was prepared and brought by Rev. E. F. 
'aker, Pastor of New Friendship Church. It was discussed by Bro. 
laker and adopted. 

Report on PubSic SVIorals 

In this report the word crime is used to include all lawlessness; because 
iwlessness is generally a crime against a person or property. It will deal 
ith principles rather than statistics. 

Mr. J. Edgar Hoover, who is probably the best informed man in the 
ation on this subject, and who is critically ill at this writing and merits 
le earnest prayers cf all Christians in the land, says: "The problem of 
rime and the struggle between law observance and anti-social behavior are 
s old as man. Crime involves human beings possessed of a free will and 
ving in a society which is becoming increasingly complex. Any success in 
le war against crime depeads to a large degree upon an intelligent approach 
3 this problem by all our citizens." 

We are all agreed that lawlessness cannot be explained by any one ele- 
lent. Man is so complex in his personal make-up, and he lives in an in- 
ironment that has so many cross-currents of thought and so many cross- 
urposes in action, and so many devergent interests that his behavior can 
ot be explained by any one factor. Therefore as we approach a study of 
his problem; try to find its causes, and offer a reasonable rerredy; we die- 
over that we are facing a major task. Things are happening so rapidly, 
nd on such vast scales; that most of us, old and young, are in a state of 
onfusion. Who dares to speak with authority in this realm of cause and 
ffect. It is evident that our scientific advances have far out-stripped our 
piritual advances. Most of our scientific achievements have been in the 
eld of destruction rather than construction. We are more advanced in the 
rt of war than we are in the art of living. Nevertheless it is heartening that 
rime for the first six months of this year in urban areas decreased. But it 
5 distressing to report that it increased in rural areas. And this body is 
oncerned, for the most part with rural conditions. 

We may act on other vital matters in our association during these two 
ays. But if we can see this question as it actually is (and we should have 
o great difficulty there; because it is in the headlines of every daily paper, 
ondensed in most periodicals, proclaimed over the radio, and dramatized 
|efore our eyes in public.) If we can see it and then commit ourselves to 
Joing something about it, it will probably net greater returns than any 
Ither single action of the association. 

| The first question naturally is, "What shall we do?" We must begin at 
pi beginning; at the very grass roots of civilization, the home. From there 
In through every phase of development we must teach the fundamental con- 
spts of law and order. These cannot be successfully taught apart from the 
asic idea that this is God's world, and that He is still at the controls. If 
e can get that idea clearly fixed in the minds of all, children in particular, 
len we can proceed to build a moral respect for law and not a fear of law. 



24 



^traifoa of ilje 



The major factor in this whole problem is spiritual; therefore, it is primar-j 
ily a task of the churches. Again I quote Mr. Hoover, "The criminal is the! 
product of spiritual starvation. Some one failed miserably to bring him; 
to know God, to love and serve Him. As a result, the criminal's attitudes! 
and actions are guided by a selfish individualism. He has no respect for the! 
law — he hates it. Moral traditions are subject to his scorn as he declares! 
war on society." We of the Christian Churches cannot escape our respon-,i 
sibility for conditions as they are. Whenever we become sufficiently dis-J 
satisfied with them as they are, and set ourselves resolutely and co-opera- J 
tively to the task of changing them, they will be changed. We have diredj 
contact with the home, and through the homes to every other department, 
of the social order. We must assert and reassert the authority of Jesus and 
the efficacy of His teachings on human behavior. That is the problem anc | 
solution of public morals as your committee understands them. 

Respectfully submitted, 

E. F. Baker 

41. The report on Relief and Annuity was prepared and brought by 
Bro. Dan S. Haywcrth of Abbotts Creek Church. It was discussed by 
Rev. B. A. Mitchel and Van Carroll. Report adopted. 

Report on Relief and Annuity 

The Relief and Annuity Board was organized in 1918, and is now um 
der the capable leadership of Dr. Walter Alexander. This board was create^ 
to meet the felt need for enabling pastors to provide for themselves security 
against the day of old age, and the time of retirement, and making sud- 
provisions while they are active and able. 

The Board has worked out a plan with each of our State Convention 1 
whereby each pastor and the church he is serving can co-operate together 
The plan provides that each minister pay 4% of his salary and the churc/i 
4%. This, with the amount added by the convention, is building up a sub 
stantial retirement fund for our pastors. No church is too small to co-op 
erate in this plan. It not only provides for the ministers, but for all salarie 
employees of our denominational working force. 

In 1945 the Widows Supplemental Annuity Plan was inaugurated anjj 
has been approved by practically all of the State Conventions. This pla r 
provides for widows of members of the Ministers Retirement Plan who? 
husbands die before retiring under the Minister's Plan. To participate i 
this plan 11/2% of the pastor's salary must be paid. 

Dues and contributions to Relief and Annuity Board under this plal 
was about $3,000,000 last year. Benefits paid out was nearly $1,000,0(1 

The plan is sound in every way, and is the only security of the pastd 
against the day of old age. It is also the shurch's only honorable way f( 
it to bear its part of the age risk of all pastors who have served it. 

Only about two-thirds of the churches in this Association are linked 
with their pastors in the Minister's Retirement Plan. All ought to be, aj 
we urge that they soon will. 

Respectfully submitted, 
D. S. Hayworth 

42. American Bible Society report was prepared and presented ly 
Miss Roxie Sheets, of Lexington 1st Church. This report adopted. M 



JCibertg baptist (Association 



25 



Report on American Bible Society 

The American Bible Society was established in 1816, and since that 
ay, 132 years ago, has published 367,000,000 copies of the Scriptures which 
ley sell below cost to those able to pay for them, and thousands of copies 
iven to those unable to buy them. 

The world must have the Bible, and have it soon, if Wendell Wilkie's 
ream of "One World" is to come true, because Jesus Christ is the only 
ope of men and nations. As Christ once warned what profit is there in 
aving gained the whole world when we have lost our souls. 

The answer to the needs of a bewildered humanity and fear-crazed 
orld is the Book, which has in every generation met the needs of the human 
airit. Mrs. Margaret T. Hills, the American Bible Society librarian reports 
lat by the end of 1947 the Scriptures had been published in 1090 languages, 
le entire Bible in 185, the New Testament in 241, and at least a Gospel, 
r other portion in 664. There were added 10 new languages in 1947. 

And yet there are nearly 1000 more languages in which no part of the 
ible has been translated. Each month some portion of the Bible is trans- 
ited into a new tongue. The Society is not able to supply all the demands. 

General McArthur said recently, "There now exists an opportunity 
ithout counterpart since the birth of Christ for the spread of the gospel 
mong the people of the Far East." To meet this opportunity will require 
me and money to reestablish the churches, hospitals and other Christian 
istitutions destroyed by the war, and to recruit the missionary forces. 

The missionary establishments in Japan are being rebuilt and expanded 
tid we dare not leave them without the Scriptures that is now welcome 
lere. This is a missionary "must." In Africa the old forms of life are pass- 
lg away, and they need the Bible to guide in the homes and evangelizing, 
carcity of Bibles in Africa is only part of the general world lack. This has 
een due to war destruction of printing plants, monetary restrictions, lack 
f shipping, and insufficient funds. 

In Korea there is a famine of the Scriptures brought about through the 
ar by restrictions on paper and printing, that bullets might be made instead* 

The American Bible Society sent 50,000 New Testaments, a free gift, 
3 the Korean people, in their language, through the American Army. But 
'hat are 50,000 Testaments among 30,000,000 people? 

Germany too, needs Bibles. In spite of the Nazi regime, many did not 
>rget the Bible. Germany published and distributed, before the war, a 
lillian Bibles a year, but none for the past eight years, and millions were 
>st in the war. The Society has, since the war, donated to the German 
eople about 5,000,000 Bibles and portions. 

Many other nations and peoples are pleading for the Bible. There is 
lussia with her "iron curtain" which seems to shut out many things in- 
luding the Bible. But the world must have the Bible. The only restric- 
ion now, is the lack of money. 

A great door and effectual is opened in Japan, China, Italy, and many 
ther countries. The opportunities have never been greater. The Lord hath 
aid, "Pray ye therefore the Lord of the harvest that he would send forth 
iborers into his harvest." A . 

] In 1947 Southern Baptists gave $91,641 to the American Bible Society, 
|nd the Society serves our Sou theren Baptist Convention work at home 



26 



^trati** of ti\e 



and abroad. Let us as individuals and as churches increase these gifts. 

Let us remember that, "He which soweth sparingly shall reap also! 
sparingly: and he which soweth bountifully shall reap also bountifully."! 
The soil has, perhaps, never been more receptive all over the world., The] 
seed has the vitality — and the Lord has assured the harvest. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Roxie Sheets 

43. The Home Mission report was prepared by Miss Katherine Feezoil 
of Lick Creek Church. For lack of time it was adopted without reading 

Report oh Home Missions 

The annual report of the Home Mission Board has been compiled. It 
reveals an interesting program of successful missionary endeavor. 

THE MISSIONARIES. During the year there were some sixty re 
placements due to resignation, retirement, or death. Home Board mission 
aries serving in Guatemala and Honduras were transferred to the Foreigi 
Mission Board, which took over the work in those Central American coun 
tries. The total number of missionaries is 720, three more than in 1946 
Add 286 student summer workers to the number of full-time missionarie 
and the grand total will be 1006. * - - »*' : 

EVANGELISTIC RESULTS. The missionaries delivered 68,425 sex 
mons and addresses, made 255,388 religious visits, contacted 55„270 person 
in personal work, and reported 24,221 conversions with 12,814 addition 
to the churches. There averaged 30 conversions for every full-time worker; 

LITERATURE. Missionaries of the Home Board distributed 52,65. 
Bibles and gospels, 1,125,132 pages of tracts, and taught 10,709 classes i 
mission study. They conducted 1,135 revivals. 

CO-OPERATIVE MISSIONS. Approximately one-fifth of the bud 
get of the Home Mission Board is spent in co-operation with state boards 
The work cf that department is reported by the states. r r; I 

MISSIONARY EDUCATION. In the field of missionary education 
it is reported that 1,979 churches participated in schools of missions, use 
ing 227 speakers arid conducting 2,718 classes, with a total participation I 
the schools of 749,155. There were 71 home missionaries who served in 9 
camps in 17 states, and 21 missionaries were committed to serve in oth^ 
programs of mission study. * 

Peak circulation for Southern Baptist HOME MISSIONS was 119,20< 
and 110,722 mission study books Were circulated. 

Two 16 mm. home mission films were released and nine new sets' \ 
slides. Projected pictures were ordered by 518 churches during 1947. 
Respectfully submitted, 
■ ■ Kalherine Feezot 

44. Report on Foreign Missions was prepared and presented by Brt 
C. C. Edinger, Pastor Hollow ay 4, Stoners Grove, and Jersey Ctiurche. 

This report was adopted. 

Report on Foreign Missions 

Shall we mark time, retreat, or advance? The Foreign Mission Boai 
is advancing. Some of the disturbed areas of the worlcj. seem to call for rj 
treat. The increasing need for large capital expenditures for our institutioi 
and agencies at home seems to call that we stand still until these needs cs 



27 



s met. One of the serious questions confronting Southern Baptists is as 
) how we can provide these millions of dollars for capital expenditures and, 
t the same time, provide for an advancing program of world missions. 

God's compassion for a broken, agonizing, lost world calls clearly and 
>udly that we advance. 

During the past years the Board has been formulating its plans for ad- 
ance. We have laid aside an emergency reserve fund to safeguard an en- 
irged world program. We have provided funds for the partial restoration 
S destroyed property and equipment. We have increased our staff of active 
lissionaries from 462 in 1943, to 619 at the end of 1947, a net increase of 147. 

We have enlarged the borders of our undertaking. During 1947, South- 
•n Baptists, thru the Foreign Mission Board, have assisted Baptist churches 
i 25 separate nations or national areas around the world, in the promotion 
f programs of Christian missions. 

In Latan America we help Baptists in Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras, 
olombia, Venezuela, Brazil, Paraguay, Uruguay, Argentina, and Chile, 
le have no missionaries located in Guatemala or Venezuela now, but it is 
robable that Guatemala will have within a year at least one missionary 
3uple, and we are assisting Baptist churches in these three countries. 

In Africa our largest mission is Nigeria. A couple was recently assign- 
l to the Gold Coast. 

In Europe, prior to World War II, we had missionaries located in Spain, 
:aly, Yugoslavia, Hungary, and Romania. At the present time we have 
lissionaries only in Spain and Italy, But we provide assistance in one form 
| another in all these five areas. 

In the Near East we have, at present, missionaries in Palestine, Trans- 
Drdan, and Arabia. Also appointees assigned to Syria and Lebanon. 

The Foreign Mission Board has developed five separate mission under- 
ikings in China. In the South China Mission, the Central Mission, and 
iterior Mission, all stations have been re-occupied by missionaries. In 
forth China only three stations are occupied, the remaining part and all 
I the Manchurian Mission are held by Chinese Communist forces, a situa- 
on which prevents our missionaries from operating in these areas. 

The Japan Baptist Convention was re-organized in 1947, with a mem- 
ership of 16 churches. These churches have adopted an enlargement pro- 
ram and are asking Southern Baptists for a minimum of 60 missionaries 
ithin the next four years. 

BOARD'S BASIC POLICY— In these 25 areas around the world, 
outhern Baptists, through the Foreign Board, are assisting Baptist churches 
l the promotion of programs of Christian missions. In that sentence the 
asic policy and objective of the Foreign Mission Board is summed up. 

In their efforts in other lands, the primary objective of our Missionaries 
the winning of people to God through faith in Jesus Christ as their per- 
nal Saviour. These people who have been saved organize themselves in- 
) churches; the churches organize themselves into Baptist associations and 
mventions. Through the associations and conventions, the churches pro- 
ct programs of Christian missions in evangelism, education, publication, 
edical work, and other forms of Christian service common among us. 

This is to say that the Foreign Mission Board is assisting Baptist 
lurches in these 25 countries, in conducting all types of Baptist activities 



i 



(JNttmiea of ilje 



promoted by the Southern Baptist Convention, through churches, state 
mission boards, the Home Mission Board, colleges, seminaries, the Sundaj 
School Board, hospitals, W. M U., and other Christian service. 

Missionaries of the Foreign Mission Board serving in these countries 
are a part of these programs of churches and, as such, serve in all phase; 
of denominational activity. 

MISSIONARY PERSONNEL — At the end of the year, the Foreigr 
Mission Board had 625 missionaries under appointment, 76 of whom wen 
appointed in 1947. In Latin America 237 are serving in 7 republics. Assign, 
ed to China 233, to Japan 20, to Africa 104, to Europe 15, to Near East 12. 
and 24 to Hawaii. 

FINANCES— This world-wide program was supported by total gifti> 
from Southern Baptists amounting to $4,734,288. This was made up o' 
$2,277,000 of undesignated funds from the Co-operative Program, $1,064,10- 
designated money from all sources, and $1,393,183 from the Lottie Mooi 
Christmas Offering. 

The Board was compelled to lay aside a reserve from undesignates 
funds in 1947 to cover the reduction of $460,000 in operating funds in 1948 1 
due to the reduction of the operating budgets of Convention agencies froil' 
$5,000,000 in 1947 to $4,000,000 in 1948. 

During the year the Committee for world relief received $271,482. 

The Board has in preparation a world-wide program of extensive ad! 
vance in 1948 and the years immediately following. Southern Baptists 
6,000,000 strong cannot continue to answer the world call with 6$ 
missionaries and an average per capita gift of 700 a year. The God I 
whom we believe, the faith which we proclaim, and the need of the worU: 
all call for ADVANCE. 

C. C. Edinger 

45. Nominations for Officers for the coming year were presented b. 
Rev. C. C. Matheny, Pastor of Erlanger Church. Report adopted. 

Officers for 1348-49 



Moderator N. C. Teague 

Vice Moderator J. O. Walton 

Clerk A. L. Snider 

Asso. S. S. Supt. J. D. Fraley 

Asso. B. T. U. Director G. C. Lewis 

Song Leader Carey Davis 

Pianist Miss Shirley Davis 

Orphanage Representative C. C. Wall 

Chm. Promotion Executive Com E. F. Baker 

Recorder Representative Miss Dorcas Clinard 

, N. C. Teague C. F. Leek 

^ , . ^ ... \ J. O. Walton W. H. Lomax 

Executive Committee A L gnider c c Matheny 

E. F Baker C. V. Teague 



Signed: W. L. Roach 
D. S. Hayworth 
C. C. Mathenv 



'fiibevty ^aptisi (Association 



29 



US. Committee on Reports for next year. This was presented by 
(iss Sal he McCracken. The report was adopted. 

Committee on Reports for Next Year 

The following is the report of the Committee to Name Persons to 
[ake Reports in 1949. The report includes this one recommendation, that 
le title "Relief and Annuity" be changed to read "The Ministers Retire- 
ent Plan" in order to conform to the title used in our state, and in order 
) bring the Association closer to the service which it tries to render by 
lis interest. 

We recommend the following for the following reports at the 1949 
eeting of the Association: 

merican Bible Society Mrs. Grace Battle Mills Home 

aptist Hospital Dr. Furman Covington Thomasville 1st 

hristian Education Rev. O. W. Rhodenhiser Wallburg 

hristian Literature Rev. John A. McMillan Mills Home 

o reign Missions Rev. C. C. Matheny Erlanger 

ome Missions Rev. D. W. Digh Sheets Memorial 

Ministers Retirement Plan Rev. Jesse Dickens Smith Grove 

[usic Mary Alice Jesse Lexington 1st 

rphanage Dr. Zeno Wall Mills Home 

ublic Morals Rev. A. L. McGee Carolina Avenue 

tate Missions Rev. J. Harvey Clark Rich Fork 

tate of Churches Rev. E. F. Baker New Friendship 

and ay Schools H. M. Snider Denton 

raining Union G. C. Lewis New Friendship 

/oman's Missionary Union Mrs. Beamer Barnes Lexington 1st 

Respectfully submitted, 
Chas. F. Leek, Chm. 

i7 . Committee to restudy Resolution on Ordination of New Ministers 

nd Organization of New Churches: 

J. Roy Clifford, Chm. J. O. Walton C. C. Mathey 

Chas. F. Leek B. A. Mitchell J. A. McMillan 

E. C. Roach 

t8. Finance Committee report was presented by Bro. H. C. Myers of 
exington 1st Church. The report was adopted. 

L. That we recognize that highest per capita giving came from the new 

churches and missions of the Association. 
2. That an outline of the duties and work of the Associational Missionary 

be mailed each church, including the churches obligation to same. 

That each church be asked to give a minimum of 50 per month per 

capita to the Associational work. 
L The Associational Clerk should be allowed $50.00 more since his work is 

greatly increased. Also handles the Associational Missionary's records 

and finances. 

Respectfully, 
H. C. Myers, Chm. 



30 



(JHimit^s of the 



49. Report on Obituaries. This was read by Bro. C. C. Edinger, ant 
prayer was offered by Dr. Zeno Wall, Superintendent of Mills Home 

(Report on Obituaries on page 31.) 

50. Bro. J. C. Canipe of Hendersonville, brought the closing message 
His subject was, "Christ's Imperatives on Evangelism." 

51. The Association adjourned to meet with Sheets Memorial Bap \ 
tist Church on Tuesday aod Wednesday after the 4th Sunday it 
September, (27th-28th), 1949. 

Benediction by Bro. J. C. Canipe. 

Rev. Ni C. Teague, Moderator A. L. Snider, Clerk 



1948 ASSOCIATION AL MINUTE FUNp } 

The follov/ing is the 1948 Minute Fund paid by each church which 
the State statistical blanks did not carry for this y&ar. 



CHURCH 




AMOUNT 


Abbotts Creek 




$ 18.00 


Carolina Avenue ...... 




9.80 


Center Hill 




10,00 


Churchland 




15.00 


Dsnton 1st 




13.00 


Er'anger 




15.85 


Floyd 




2.00 


Glennanna 




5.00 


Greenwood 




6.00 


High Rock 




3.00 


Holloways 




9.00 


Jersey .: 




12.00 


Lake View >»sS.^. 




8.C0 


Lexington 1st 




51.65 


Liberty 




8.25 


Lick ..Creek ... 




............... 3-.00 


Mills Home 




,. 1500 


Mountain View 


\ 


3.75 


New Friendship 




• i5.co 


Oak Hill 




<: 6.56 


Pleasant Plains 




3.00 


Reeds 




24.20 


Reid Street 




9.00 


Rich Fork 




15.00 


Sheets Memorial 




25.00 


Smith Grove 




r: 6.25 


South Side 




,. : ....: r jo.oo 


Stoners Crove 




10.00 


Summerville :.. 




':..:..:.'..:!:.. 5.00 


Taylors Grove 




i-.d: 1.00 


Thomasville 1st 




40.00 


Union Grove 




1.40 


Wallburg 




10.00 


Walters Grove 




4,'35 


Welcome 




7.00 




TOTAL 


$399,05 



31 



(l)itr limn? (Snerfl 

Who have answered the Roll Call since our last meeting 

In my Father's House are many mansions, 
I go to prepare a place for you. John 14:2 

Abbotts Creek—Mrs. Phoabe Wheeler, Mr. Matt Glascoe, Mrs. 

Ella Teague, Mrs. Mary Womble. 
Carolina Avenue — Mrs. E. Z. Smith. Sr. 
Center Hill— Mrs. Stokes Styers. 

Churchland-Mr. M. L. Feezor, Mr. R. L. Kenerly, Mrs. J. H. Kesler. 

Denton— Mrs. Stokes Tysinger, Mr. John Morris. 

Erlanger— None. 

Floyd— Mrs. Walter Lee Shipton. 

Greenwood — Mrs. J. C. Robinson 

High Rock— None. 

Glennanna — Mrs. Dennis Brewer, Deacon Tommy^McCarn. 
Holloways— Mrs. Mary Eliza Tysinger. 

Jersey— Mrs. Edd Copley, Mr. John A. Eller, Mr. Joe F. Smith, 

Mr. Fred Smith. 
Lake View — None. 

Lexington 1st— Mr. G. D. Hamil, Mrs. C. L. Coggins, Mrs. N. C. 
Mendenhall, Mrs. Mary Yarbro, Mr. C. R. Hilton, Mr. Clay 
Welborn, Mrs. C. F. Shuler, Mrs. H. P. Gallimore. 

Liberty-Mr. Junior Watford, Mr. Charlie Miller, Mr. Herbert Wray . 

Liok Creek — Mrs John Kinney, Mrs. Cora Reid Badgett. 

Mills Home None. 

Mountain View — None. 

New Friendship — Mrs. Clementine Evans, Mr. Thomas Lambeth. 

Oak Hill— None. 

Pleasant Plains — None. 

Reid Street— Mr. J. B. Scarboro. 

Reeds— Mr. Carl McMahan, Mrs. B. C. Evans. 

Rich Fork— Mrs. T. H. Small, Mrs. Minnie Crotts, Mrs. Bertha 

Payne, Mr. Edd Conrad. 
Sheets Memorial — Mr. Linsey Hedrick, Mr. Henry Peacock, 

Mrs. Martha Epley. 
Smith Grove— Mr. Thomas Gobble, Mr. Robert Elverson, Mr- 

Tobe Smith. 
South Side— Mr. Dewey Ward. 
Stoners Grove— Mr. S. W. Beckner. 
Summerville - Mr. T. C. Daniel. 

Thomasville— Mr. H. Grady Dickens, Mrs. Ed Perryman, Mrs. 

Louella Call. 
Taylors Grove — None. 
Union Grove — None 

Wallburg— Mrs. Crissie Weavil, Mrs. Clara Craven, Mr. P. E. 

Whicker. 

Walters Grove — None, 
Welcome — None 



C. C. Edinger, Chm. 



32 



(ffliixmtes of trie 



MINUTES OF WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

Secretary's Report 

The Woman's Missionary Union of Liberty Association met for its 43rd 
Annual Session with the First Baptist Church, Lexington, April 13, 1948, 
with Mrs. P. M. Hendricks, Superintendent, presiding. The Theme for the 
meeting was, "For ye serve the Lord Christ." 

The morning worship was conducted by Mrs. Bearner Barnes and Mrs. 
C. C. Wall, Sr. of Lexington 1st Church. 

The greetings were given by Mrs. J. Roy Clifford and the response by 
Mrs. Paul Kestler. 

At the business session visitors were recognized, committees appointed, 
secretary and treasurer's report given, awards presented, and a motion car-: 
ried that the Superintendent should receive $10. per year for travel expense. 

Special music by Mills Home was heard at this time. Avenues of Ser- 
vice in our Commemoration Year included the following reports: 

Report of Superintendent Mrs. P. M. Hendricks 

Report of Young People's Leader Miss Beatrice Council 

Read by Miss Eva Faircloth 

Reoort of Royal Ambassador Counselor Rev. N. C. Teague 

State Worker Miss Hilda Mayo 

Mrs. Fletcher Wall presented our missionary speaker, Miss Estello 
Councilman of Paraquay, to the group. Miss Councilman told of the Ave- 
nues of Services by which one served the Lord Christ on foreign missior 
fields. Rev. J. Roy Clifford, our next speaker was intrcduced by Mrs.P.M 
Hendricks. He spoke forcefully on the subject, "Serving the Lord Chrisi 
through Witnessing." 

A Solo— "The Lord's Prayer" by Mrs. Macy Money concluded tht 
mcrning service, and lunch was served by ladies of the hostess church. 

The afternoon service began at 1:30 with the singing of the hymcj 
"Send the Light." The devotionais were led by Rev. Vann Carroll, Asso: 
ciational missionary, after which Mrs. Charles F. Leek, of First Church 
Thomasville, conducted the memorial service. 

The following reports were then given and adopted: 
Mission Study Community Missions Training School-Margaret Fund 
Stewardship Literature Report of Committees 

Mrs. Stafford Webb, Divisionional Superintendent, installed the follow; 
ing officers who had been elected to serve: 

Superintendent Mrs. P. M. Hendricks 

Associate Supt Mrs. Bearner Barnes 

Secretary-Treasurer Miss Veola Evans 

Mission Study Chm. Mrs. N. C. Teague 

Community Missions Chm. Mrs. R. L. Palmer 

Training School Chm. Mrs. Victor L. Andrews 

Young People's Leader Miss Helen Tate 

Royal Ambassador's Leader 

Stewardship Chm. Mrs. C. C. Copped ge 

Literature Chm Mrs. J. N. Shockey 

Miss Councilman discussed informally more phases of her work in Parf 
aquay, after which the Youth Choir cf Lexington 1st Church, rendered tw 
selections. The closing prayer was offered by Rev. Vann Carroll. 
Respectfully submitted, 

Miss Veola Evans, Secretary, W. M.U. 



Wtbcrtgr -baptist JXssoctaiton 



33 



R&port of W. M. U. Community Missions— 1947 

It is very encouraging to report that community missions shows a sub- 
mtial gain over the previous year in every phase of work. 

Before Jesus ascended into heaven He summed up His final charge to 
3 followers in one sentence, "Ye shall be my witnesses." A duty so sim- 
i and joyful that any one who has been born again through faith in Jesus 
irist can witness. "The Gospel to every creature" makes every saved per- 
il responsible for the salvation of every unsaved person. Community 
issions is the plan of work which has proved successful in soul winning, 
rst we must locate the people then give them the gospel. Realizing if we 
? to be effective witnesses to Christ and lead the lost to Him, we must 
ve clean hands and a pure heart empowered by His Spirit, and move 
th compassionate love for all people. 

We want to resolve this new year of 1948 to carry out a well rounded 
immunity Mission Program, and that we major in soul winning. 

The following are points for particular emphasis this year: 

PRAY— That in preparation for this high holy calling we give ourselves 
to more definite prayer for ourselves and others. 

That continous prayer be made for a spiritual revival in all our churches. 
That we give ourselves more earnestly to promotion of family worship. 
The good news comes that our 60th Anniversary Commemoration which 
weare celebrating this year is making this a point of special emphasis. 
This statement is so true: "If families will pray together they will stay 
together." We must try to stem the tide of divorce which threatens our 
very civilization. Prayer can make happy and permanent homes. 
, STUDY— II Timothy 2:15. That we may be more diligent in the study 
of His word, which is the "Sword of the Spirit. 

, That every W. M. S. study at least one of the recommended books on 
soul winning. 

That the Guide for Community Missions be studied annually by every 
society. 

)OK — On the fields for they are white already to harvest. John 4:35. 
, Look for the needs of the community and map out a program to meet it. 
, Look at your membership and know the capabilities of the members so 
as to assign work best suited to them. 

| PLAN — That the Community Mission chairman and her committee, 
lich includes the. counsellors of Y.W.A., G.A., R.A. and Sunbeam leaders 
in, a month by month program of work in which definite assignments are 
ide to groups and individuals from the Sunbeams through the W. M. S. 

WORK- John 9:4. That we work and follow through until every revealed 
led is met. That the emphasis be on spiritual results and aim to win souls. 

REPORT— That all missionary activities and the number of members 
paged in each, and results be reported to the associational community 
issions chairman as promply as possible after the close of the quarter. 
[ As a special Community Mission Project for 1947, the Liberty W. M.U. 
(teed a Bible for every bed in Lexington and Thomasville hospitals, 
i May we covenant together to pray more earnestly, to study more dili- 
jply, to look more carefully, to work more faithfully, to report more 
I'.urately and regularly— that we may be unashamed workers of God. 



34 



^brutes of iije 



The following is a summary of reports sent in: w.M.S.-Y.w.A.-G.A.-R.A.-S.B-Totj 

Enlisting all members in Community Missions 18 10 25 12 8 73 

Having Community Missions Committee 21 10 19 11 3 ■ 

Reporting Community Missions 25 10 25 15 13 8£| 

Number of Surveys 7 4 1 8 I 

Number classes studying Guide to Community Missions 10 5 1 1< 

Number classes studying book on Soul Winning 12 5 1 1 11 

Engaged in definite Evangelistic Efforts 15 4 8 7 1 3< 

Showing Christian Fellowship 21 9 21 11 9 ■ 

Lifting Moral Standards of Community 9 4 1 11 2 - 

Number of Members Engaged in Community Missions 453 62 125 77 127 84<f 

Respectfully submitted, 
Mrs. R. L. Palmer, Community Mission Chm. 

W. M. U. Stewardship Report— 1947 
As we come to close the books of Stewardship for 1947 and look ovr 
the records we find we have made a gain in tithers of 148 for the W. MM 
and 302 in the young people's organizations. Total gain for the associatic; 
of 450 tithers. There were 12 stewardship classes for W. M. S., a gain | 
classes. The young people had 17 stewardship classes, a loss of 9 class 
for the year. One society observed Stewardship Week. There were 6 W.M.S. 
and young people's organizations observing church night of Stewards!^ 
Again we proudly report that Mills Home Society secured a gift to missio: 
from every resident church member. j 
Each year as we come to look ahead we square our shoulders and 1], 
our heads high as we plan for the future, but this year, our Commemorati. 
year, we must let the seven words, "For God and Home and every Land; 
chosen by the leaders of the W. M. U. of 60 years ago become anew I 
motivating purpose of each of us and our association, and really mean 
Our goals for 1948 are— 10% increase in Co-operative Program gifts ai 
75% of our W. M. U. members giving through this Co-operative Prograi 
10% increase in tithers. 

Observance of the Seasons of Prayer for State, Home and Foreign M 
sions, including an offering during eaeh season of prayer. Goals for Libei,^ 
Association: Co-operative Program $7,109.75, Annie Armstrong Offen 
$1,255.82, Lottie Moon Christmas Offering $2,158.66. 

WE PLAN TO— Continue the study of Stewardship in the circles; I 
operate with the General Convention in association-wide weeks of stewai 
ship emphasis; Seek to enlist every resident woman member of the chui 
in giving to missions; Give increased emphasis to the tithe as the accepl 
plan financing God's work. 

WE PLAN TO— Stress the Undesignated Co-operative Program as ■ 
best and fairest means for supporting all Kingdom causes; Emphasize spec, 
offerings as a means of expressing our love for God and demonstrating 1 
devotion to His cause by sacrificial gifts; Give renewed emphasis to 
Stewardship Education Plans for all young people's organizations wit. 
Stewardship Program to climax and denomstrate the year's training. 

As we look at the new record sheet of Stewardship for 1948 let us 
member, as individuals we give account to God for our Stewardship, fr 
day to day of Time, Talents, Money, Training the young, even our | 
life We could not, we dare not, but give Him our best. Jesus said, 1 
ye begining at Jerusalem." To obey His command we must be faitt 



35 



wards in our homes, our church, our community and Liberty Associa- 
E This Commemoration Year is a challenge to us as Christians. 
Respectfully submitted, 
Mrs. C. C. Coppedge, Stewardship Chm. 

Report on Training School — 1947 

Woman's Mission Union has invested hundreds of thousands of dollars, 
•ing the past forty years in its Training School in Louisville, Kentucky, 
a response to a strategic missionary challenge. 
Keeping the basic purpose of our school in mind may we continue to be 
al to her by encouraging the most consecrated and best equipped young 
men to seek further preparation for the greatest of all vocations — point- 
souls to Christ. 

Equally grateful are we for our Margaret Fund that has been used to 
p 555 sons and daughters of Southern Baptist Convention missionaries 
ce 1916, to receive educational advantages. May we continue to give 
al support to the Annie Armstrong Offering and Lottie Moon Christmas 
ering that we may continue to have a part in this great cause. 

As your Training School and Margaret Fund Chairman I have had the 
viledge of sending birthday greetings to our Training School and Mar- 
et Fund Students from and in North Carolina. 

Our Socities of Liberty Association had a part in helping our State pay 
the Easter dinner this past year at the Training School. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Mrs. Victor L. Andrews, Training School Chm. 

W. M. U. Treasurer's Report 



Receipts for 1947 $87.43 

April Balance 2.63 

DISBURSEMENTS for 1947 

April— Miss Lide (Missionary) $10.00 

Expenses for Mrs. Wacaster 3.00 

Expenses for Superintendent ; 7.00 

: Charity and Children (Printing) 7.25 

■ Mrs. V. L. Andrews 1.00 

Sept.— Expenses for Y. P. Camp 10.00 

Dec— Rally Expenses, G.A.&R.A.__ 10.00 

Field Worker 5.00 

Associational Expenses ; 5.00 

Divisional Expenses 5.00 

Mrs. N.C.Teague (Mission Study Exp.)__ 5.00 

March— Miss Council (Y. P. Work) 5.00 

Expenses for Superintendent 2.00 

Total $75.25 

Balanee____ j $14.81 

Respectfully submitted, 



Miss Veola Evans. Treasurer W. M. U. 



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Historical Table of the Association 

Year WHERE HELD PREACHER MODERATOR CLERK 

1832 .1 Jamestown Geo. W. Purefoy Wm. Burch Peter Owen 

1833 Holloways Josiah Williams Ell Carroll Peter Owen 

1834 ....Abbotts Creek Eli Carroll EH Carroll Peter Owen 

1835 Liberty John Culpepper Eli Carroll Peter Owen 

1836 Jersey Eli Carroll Eli Carroll Peter Owen 

1837 Lick Creek Peter Owen Eli Carroll Peter Owen 

1338 Abbotts Creek Benjamin Lanier Eli Carroll Peter Owen 

1839. .2 Pine Meeting H. ...Eli Carroll Eli Carroll Peter Owen 

1840 Holloways Josiah Wiseman Eli Carroll Peter Owen 

1841 New Friendship Benjamin Lanier Gershom Tuessey Peter Owen 

1842 Reeds X Roads Barton Roby Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

1843 Lick Creek Benjamin Lanier Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

1844 Abbotts Creek Wm. Turner Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

1845 ..Jersey Alfred Renney Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

1846 Lick Creek Wm. Turner Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

1847 Abbotts Creek Wm. Turner Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

1848 Reeds X Roads Benjamin Lanier Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

1849 3 Big Creek Azariah Williams Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

1850 1 Jamestown Benjamin Lanier Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

1851 Liberty Wm. Turner Wm. Turner Azariah Williams 

1852 Holloways Z. Minor Wm. Turner Azariah Williams 

1853 Abbotts Creek Benjamin Lanier Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

1854 . . .Reeds X Roads Alfred Kenney Josiah Spurgeon Azonah Williams 

1855 Lick Creek Benjamin Lanier Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

1856 Abbotts Creek Unknown Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

1857 Reeds X Roads Wm. Lambeth Amos Weaver Azariah Williams 

1858 Holloways Amos Weaver Amos Weaver Azariah Williams 

1859 New Friendship Benjamin Lanier Benjamin Lanier J. H. Owen 

1860 .Abbotts Creek Wm. Turner Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

1861 Jersey J- B. Jackson J. B. Jackson Azariah Williams 

1862 Lick Creek F. H. Jones J. B. Jackson Azariah Williams 

1863 Abbotts Creek T. W. Tobey J. B. Jackson Azariah Williams 

1864 Thomasville W. H. Hammer Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

1865 (No Session Held On Account of Conditions Caused By Civil War) 

18 66 Lick Creek W. T. Waters Benjamin Lanier J. H. Owen 

1867 Abbotts Creek Benjamin Lanier Benjamin Lanier J. H. Owen 

1868 Jersey W. H. Hammer Benjamin Lanier J.H.Owen 

1869 "'"."Abbotts Creek A. P. Stokes Wm. Turner. J. H. Owen 

1870 . .3 Big Creek ...Wm. Turner Wm. Turner J. H. Owen 

1871. ..2 Pine Meeting H. ...W. H. Wingate Wm. Turner J. H. Owen 

1872 .. New Friendship H. Morton J. H. Brooks J. L. Pleasant 

1873 Holloways Thomas Carrick H. Morton Thomas Carnck 

1874 ...Lick Creek A. F. Reed Wm. Turner Thomas Carrick 

1875 4 Muddy Creek C. T. Bailey Wm. Turner ...Thomas Carrick 

1876 Reeds X Roads H. W. Reinhart Wm. Turner Thomas Carrick 

1877 High Point J. B. Richardson Wm. Turner Henry Sheets 

1878 3 Big Creek ...H. W. Reinhart H. W. Reinhart Henry Sheets 

1879 Liberty Harvey Hatcher H. W. Reinhart Henry Sheets 

1880 ...Holloways S.F.Conrad H. W. Reinhart Henry Sheets 

1881 Jersey Henry Sheets H. W. Reinhart Henry Sheets 

1882 4 Muddy Creek S. H. Thompson H. W. Reinhart Henry Sheets 

iili:: I Pine Meeting H. ...O. F. Gregory H. W Reinhart Henry Sheets 

1884 Summerville ....S.H.Thompson Wm. Turner Henry bheets 

lilt Le n 'ton J. B. Richardson Wm. Turner Henry Sheets 

li^::::Ablotts Creek J. B. Richardson Wm. Turner Henry Sheets 

1887 Lick Creek Henry Sheets James bmith Henry bheets 

1888 Reeds X Roads C. Durham Wm. Turner Henry Sheets 

1889 New Friendship W. F. Watson James Smith Henry bheets 

1890 Jersev J. M, Bennett James Smith Henry |neets 

189i:::2'prne e MeetingH. ...J. K. Fant James Smith Henry Sheets 



^toerig ^Baptist (Association 



ear WHERE HELD PREACHER MODERATOR CLERK 

192 High Point Henry Sheets James Smith Henry Sheets 

593 Kernersville R. T. Bryan James Smith Henry Sheets 

(94 Holloways R. Vandeventer James Smith Henry Sheets 

(95 Pleasant Grove J. M. Hilliard James Smith Henry Sheets 

(96 Denton Henry Sheets James Smith Henry Sheets 

(97- ..5 Piney Grove W. H. Rich James Smith Henry Sheets 

(98 Rich Fork J. H. Lambeth James Smith Henry Sheets 

(99 Abbotts Creek S. B.Wilson James Smith Henry Sheets 

)00 Reeds X Roads W. H. Rich James Smith Henry Sheets 

(01 Lexington C. A. G. Thomas James Smith Henry Sheets 

102 Lick Creek Henry Sheets James Smith Henry Sheets 

•03 Jersey W. A. Smith James Smith Henry Sheets 

104. ..2 Pine Meeting H. ...Geo. P. Harrill James Smith Henry Sheets 

105 New Friendship John R. Miller James Smith Henry Sheets 

)06..... .Thomasville J. S. Farmer James Smith Henry Sheets 

107 Wallburg R. T. Vann J. W. Nowell P. S. Vann 

108 Denton M. L. Kesler I. W. Nowell.. P. S. Vann 

..Liberty S. D. Swaim Henry Sheets P. S. Vann 

10 Orphanage O. A. Keller Henry Sheets P. S. Vann 

11 Abbotts Creek G. A. Martin Henry Sheets P. S. Vann 

12 Stoners Grove O. A. Keller Henry Sheets P. S. Vann 

13. .....Rich Fork M. L. Kesler Henry Sheets P. S. Vann 

14 Holloways G. A. Martin G. A. Martin Henry Sheets 

15 Center Hill O. A. Keller O. A. Keller Henry Sheets 

16 Wallburg I. M. Mercer O. A. Keller Henry Sheets 

17 Smith Grove Fred D. Hale R. S. Green Henry Sheets 

18 Lexington M. L. Kesler R. S. Green Archibald Johnson 

19 Denton R.E.White R. S. Green Archibald Johnson 

New Friendship J. S. Hardaway R. S. Green Archibald Johnson 

1 Churchland M. L. Kesler R. S. Green Archibald Johnson 

12 Summerville W. A. Hough R. S. Green Paul C. Newton 

J3 Abbotts Creek W. L. Barrs Archibald Johnson ...Paul C. Newton 

24 Reeds C. H. Trueblood Archibald Johnson ...Sam J. Smith 

25 Liberty C. A. Owens Archibald Johnson ...Sam J. Smith 

26 Rich Fork E.N.Gardner Archibald Johnson ...Sam J. Smith 

27 .Thomasville H. T. Penry Archibald Johnson ...Sam J. Smith 

8 Holloways M. L. Kesler Archibald Johnson ...Sam J. Smith 

!9 Stoners Grove J. M. Hays Archibald Johnson ...Sam J. Smith 

i0 Abbotts Creek M. L. Kesler Archibald Johnson ...Sam J. Smith 

1 Denton M. O. Alexander G. Wilson Miller Sam J. Smith 

..Lexington G. A. Martin G. Wilson Miller Sam J. Smith 

..Lick Creek E. F. Mumford G. Wilson Miller Sam J. Smith 

4 Jersey W. L. Warfford G. Wilson Miller Sam J. Smith 

5 Mills Home E. C. Roach R. D, C ovington Sam J. Smith 

..Reeds J. A. Neilson R. D. Covington Sam J. Smith 

7 Churchland W. K. McGee R. D. Covington Sam J. Smith 

..Denton John A. McMilliam G. Wilson Miller Sam J. Smith 

9 Wallburg H. M. Stroup R. D. Covington Sam J. Smith 

Center Hill L. S. Gaines R. D. Covingson Sam J. Smith 

1 New Friendship N. C. Teague R. D. Covington Sam J. Smith 

2 Abbotts Creek R. A. Herring H. M. Stroup Sam J. Smith 

3 Lexington B. A. Mitchell H. M. Stroup Sam J. Smith 

4 Thomasville C. B. Atkinson H. M. Stroup A. L. Snider 

5 Jersey V. W. Sears N. C. Teague A. L. Snider 

• Denton J. Roy Clifford N. C. Teague A. L. Snider 

.Wallburg E. F. Baker N. C. Teague A. L. Snider 

8 Smith Grove Charles F. Leek N. C. Teague A. L. Snider 

1. Now is High Point 3. Now is Eldorado 

2. Now is Churchland 4. Now is Clemmonsville 
5. Now is Wallburg 



MINUTE S OF THE 

Liberty Baptist association 

North Carolina 
1949 



One Hundred and Seventeenth Annual Session 

Held With 

Sheets Memorial Baptist Church 
September 27-28, 1949 



The next Session ie to be held September 26-27, 1950 

j^YJi \ Holloways Baptist Church, Rt. 6, Lexington 
( Stoners Grove Baptist Church, Southmont 



MINUTES OF THE 

Liberty Baptist Association 

North Carolina 
19 4 9 

• •s><G). 1 ^.(D>-st)- 



One Hundred and Seventeenth Annual Session 

Held With 

Sheets Memorial Baptist Church 
September 27-28, 1949 



The next Session is to be held September 26-27, 1950 

With \ H°H° wa y s Baptist Church, Rt. 6, Lexington 
} Stoners Grove Baptist Church, Southmont 



PRINTED BY HOMESTEAD PRINT SHOP, 
RT. 6. WINSTON-SALEM. N. C. 

Maskey M. Smith, Proprietor 



2 



Liberty Baptist Association 



INDEX 

Annual Sermon 

Constitution and By-Laws 

Committee Reports: Executive 

Obituary 

Officers for Next Year 

Program 

Reports for Next Year — 

Resolutions 

Time, Place and Preacher 

Directory: Associational 

Choir 

Church 

Auxiliaries 

State Institutions 

Historical Table ____ 

Map of Association Inside Back C< 

Messengers 

Minute Fund 

Minutes of W. M. U. 

Proceedings 

Reports: American Bible Society 

Associational Missionary 

Baptist Hospital 

Christian Education 

Christian Literature 

Church Music 

Foreign Missions 

Home Missions 

Orphanage 

Ministers Retirement Plan__ 

Public Morals 

State of Churches ___ 

State Missions 

Sunday School 

Training Union 

Treasurer 

Woman's Missionary Union 
Tables, Statistical 



Liberty Baptist Association 



s 



Constitution and By-Laws 

Name 

Article 1. The name of the body shall be "The Liberty Baptist 
Association." 

Object 

Article 2. It shall be the object of this Association to furnish the 
Gospel (as we hold it) to the people within the bounds of the Association, 
and to co-operate with the Baptist State Convention. 

Membership 

Article 3. The Association shall consist of the officers of the Associa- 
tion, pastors of the churches of the Association, and messengers from the 
churches. Each shall be entitled to 3 messengers and 1 additional messen- 
ger for every 50 members or fraction thereof over and above 100 members. 

Officers 

Article 4. The officers of this Association shall be a moderator, vice 
moderator, a clerk and a treasurer, all of whom shall be elected each year 
by the Association at its annual meeting and shall hold office until their 
successors are elected. The duties of the officers shall correspond to the 
duties of the same officers in like organizations, or as defined by the Asso- 
ciation from time to time. 

Boards and Committees 

Article 5. The Association shall elect an Executive Committee each 
year whose duties shall be to look after having the gospel preached in all 
parts of the Association, and to attend to all business of the Association be- 
tween the session and to make such reports as they deem advisable at the 
annual meeting of the Association. The Association may appoint or elect 
such other boards or committees from time to time as circumstances may 
require. 

Time of Meeting 

(As amended. See page 13, 1944 Minutes) 

Article 6. The Association shall meet annually on Tuesday after the 
fourth Sunday in September. The Moderator may, at the request of the 
^Executive Committee change the time and place of meeting of this Asso- 
ciation when it may be deemed by him not expedient to meet at the time 
«or place appointed. 

Vacancies 

Article 7. The Moderator in concurrence with the Executive Com- 
mittee may fill any vacancy occuring between meetings of the Association. 

Amendments 

Article 8. This Constitution may be amended at any regular session 
M'the Association by a two-thirds vote of the number present. 

By-Laws 

No By-Laws adopted. This Association follows Kerfoots's Rules of 
Drder for Parliamentary Authority. 

STANDING RESOLUTIONS 
Ordination of New Ministers 

(See page 27, 1939 Minutes) 

1. That when a church desires to put forth a candidate for examina- 
ion and approval for ordination to the full work of the Gospel Ministry, 
i m Examining Council be summoned by written invitation of at least one 
i veek in advance from the church nominating the candidate, the Council to 



4 Minutes of the 

include the pastor and one member-at-large from each Baptist church in 
the fellowship of the Association. 

2. That the examination of the candidate be conducted publicly in the 
auditorium of the nominating church, and prior announcement given in good 
time so that all the brethren who wish to do so may attend the examination. 

3. That we ordain only those who have received defmate call to be- 
come pastor of a Baptist Church in regular standing in its Association 
which church shall have requested his ordination. 

Organization and Admission of New Churches 

(See page 20, 1941 Minutes) 

It is recommended that any group of individuals desiring to organize 
themselves into a new church with the purpose of seeking the recognition 
of and the fellowship and co-operation with this Association, be requested 
to fulfill the following requirements: 

1. Notice shall be given to the Moderator of the Association of the 
desire to organize a church before any such organization takes place. The 
Moderator will then ask the Promotion Executive Committee to study and 
pass upon the need of and the practicability for such an organization. 

2. The location of said church shall be sufficiently removed so as not 
to interfere with the work or encroach upon the territory of the churches 
already affiliated with the Association. This will be determined by the 
Promotion Executive Committee. 

3. Upon being approved by the Promotion Executive Committee the 
group will then request a council to examine the church covenant and the 
articles of faith of the proposed church. It is recommended that this coun- 
cil consist of three pastors and three laymen of the Association appointed 
by the Moderator. Should this council approve the covenant and articles 
of faith, the group will then proceed to be constituted into a Baptist Church 
of the same faith and order. 

4. The new church, having been duly organized and constituted, may 
at the next annual Association present a letter to the Association asking 
for recognition and seeking fellowship with the Association, including with 
this letter a copy of the Articles of Faith and the Church Covenant adopt- 
ed by the body, as well as a report of the work since time of organization 
as it regards all phases of our Baptist Program of Missions, Evangelism, 
Education, Social Service, Training, and Worship. 

5. The previonsly appointed council of 3 pastors and 3 laymen will 
examine the letter and reports of the newly orgonized church, and will re- 
commend to the Association its acceptance or rejection as the case may be. 

Resolution in Regard to Program Committee 

(See page 31, 1941 Minutes) 

That the Program Committee consist of the officers of the Association, 
pastors of the entertaining churches and three persons named by the Mod- 
erator during the session of the Association. 

Resolution in Regard to Messengers 

(See page 31, 1941 Minutes) 

That the names of messengers printed in the minutes include only 
those actually attending the Association from the delegations elected by 
the churches. 



Liberty Baptist Association 



5 



ASSOCIATIONAL EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

(The following adopted. See Page 38, 1942 Minutes) 

Your committee recommends that: An Executive Committee of the 
Lssociation be formed of 7 members, including the Moderator and Clerk 
f the Association, the Chairman of the Executive- Promotion Committee 
,nd 4 other members elected by the Association along with the other offi- 
ers of the Association; the committee to attend to Associational business 
letween the annual meeting, their actions to be reported to, and reviewed 
•y the Association annually. (This Executive Committee will transact 
issociational business; the Promotion-Executive Committee will promote 
he Association and Co-operative Program as formely.) 

Trustees 

(The following adopted. See Page 19, 1948 Minutes.) 

That the Association elect 3 Trustees to handle business and legal 
aatters of the Association; that they be elected for 2, 4, and 6 years respect- 
ally on a rotating system, and not eligible for re-election for 2 years after 
xpiration of term of office; that after this election the Trustees shall be 
lected and serve for a period of 6 years 



(All Addresses herein are in North Carolina unless otherwise indicated) 

Directory of Association 

Officers 

. O. Walton Moderator Mills Home, Thomasville 

am J. Smith Vice-Moderator Lexington 

L. Snider Clerk and Treasurer Box 96, Denton 

Promotion Executive Committee 

MAME CHURCH ADDRESS 

1. F. Baker, Chm New Friendship R. 5, Winston-Salem 

5. F. Moore Abbotts Creek R. 2, High Point 

Eoward Parks Center Hill R, 7, Lexington 

7. H. Lomax Churchland R. 1, Linwood 

KL. Snider Denton Box 96, Denton 

). L. Owens Floyd R. 6, Lexington 

t» C. Palmer Holloways R. 5, Lexington 

teecher Cameron High Rock R. 1, Denton 

I L. Palmer Jersey R. 1, Linwood 

/harles Sigmond Lake View R. 7, Lexington 

am J. Smith Lexington 1st , Lexington 

. B. Powell Erlanger Erlanger 

. W. Byars Sheets Memorial Lexington 

). F. Hughes Liberty R. 2, Thomasville 

{. C. Cole Lick Creek High Rock 

3. F. Motsenger New Friendship R. 5, Winston -Salem 

. L. Carrick Mountain View R. 6, Lexington 

>oy Gordon Oak Hill Memorial R. 2, High Point 

Jolon Yates Pleasant Plains Denton 

. W. Myers Reeds R. 3, Lexington 

Villie Bowers Rich Fork Thomasville 

toy G. Orrell Smith Grove R. 1, Linwood 

i. E. Lookabill Stoners Grove Southmont 

1, L. Bean Summerville Denton 

. H. Owens Taylors Grove R. 2, New London 

i. B. Laws Thomasville 1st Thomasville 

)ewey Lindon Glennanna Thomasville 

V. H. Hilton Greenwood Thomasville 

. O. Walton Mills Home Thomasville 

. Curry Regan Reid Street Thomasville 

Sdd Edps South Side Thomasville 

Vvery White Union Grove R. 1, Lexington 

I W. Rhodenhiser Wallburg Wallburg 

oe Pierce Walters Grove Jackson Creek 

I. L. Craver Welcome Welcome 

loderator, Clerk, and all Pastors of Association Ex-Omcio Members. (See Pg. 13, 1933 Minutes) 



6 



Minutes of the 



Associational Executive Committee 

J. 0. Walton Chm Thomasville O. V. Teague Wallbur 

A. L. Snider Box 96, Denton Chas F. Leek Thomasvil] 

E. F. Baker, R. 5, Winston-Salem W. H. Lomax R. 1, Linwoo 

C. M. Pegram Thomasville W. F. Gentry R. 1. Linwoo 

Associational Missionary Committee 

J. O. Walton, Chm Thomasville J. Roy Clifford Lexingto 

A. L. Snider Denton T .~ „ . ... 

E, F. Baker R. 5, Winston Salem J " " Frale y Thomasvxll 

A. R. Snipes R. 2, High Point W. H. Loraax Linwoo 

w A %socjational Trustees Associational Missionary 

Hupert E. Olive Ex. 1954 

A. L. Snider Ex. 1952 W. Van Carroll R. 3, Lexingto:: 

D. S. Hayworth Ex. 1950 

Associational Auxiliaries 

Woman's Missionary Union 

Mrs. P. M. Hendrix... Superintendent Lexingtoi 

Mrs. Fletcher Wall ...Sec.-Treas Lexingtoi 

Mies Helen Tate Y. P. Director R. 6, Lexingto: 

Sunday Schools 

W. H. Lomax, Associational Supt R. 1, Linwoo* 

Baptist Training Union 
G. C. Lewis, Director 2012 Queen St., Winston-Sale^ 



State Institutions 

(Located within the bounds of tne Association) 

Mills Home, Thomasville 

Dr. Zeno Wall General Superintendent Thomasvill 

Dr. I. G. Greer ...Chm. Board of Directors Chapel Hi 

J. D. Fraley Treasurer ThomasvihY 



Officers: Baptist Schools, State Boards, and Institutions 

(Residing within the Association) 

Loyd Philpott, Jr Trustee Mills Home Lexingtoi; 

L. A. Martin Trustee Meridith College Lexingtoi 

C. C. Wall Trustee Wake Forest College Lexingtoi 

H. E. Olive Chm. Bd. Trustees Wake Forest College Lexingtoi 

J. Roy Clifford Member of General Board Lexingtoi 

Miss Louise McMiiiian ...Acting Editor Charity and Children Thomasvill« 

Chas. F. Leek Member of State Board Thomasvilk 1 



Church Directory 

(Ordained Ministers holding Membership in the Liberty Baptist Association) 
MAME WORK CHURCH ADDRESS 

Baker, S. D Pastor South Side Thomasvill* 

Baker, E. F Pastor New Friendship R. 5, Winston-Salen! 

Bishop, S. A Retired Erlanger Erlangei 

Broadway, B. V Pastor High Rock R. 1, Thomaevill<; 

Brooks, D. P S. W Lexington 1st Lexingtor 

Clifford, J. Roy Pastor Lexington 1st Lexingtei! 

Carroll, W. Wan Asso. Missionary Reeds R. 3, Thomasvilk 

Clark, J. Harvey Pastor Rich Fork Thomasvilh 

Dickens, J. W Pastor Center Hill, Smith Grove R. 6, Lexingtor 

Davis, J. T, Partor Sheets Memorial Lexingtor 

Dunn, J. O Pastor Lake View Box 955, Spencei 

Edinger, C. C Pastor Stoners Grove, Southmonl 

Gallimore, A. R Missionary Lexington 1st Wake Forest) 

Gentry, W. F Pastor Churchland R. 1, Linwooct 

Harris, George C Not Stated Erlanger Erlangeiji 

H jpkins, W. B Pastor Walters Grove China Grovti 

Hartman, O. M Pastor Liberty, Welcome R. 2, Winston-Salem 

Hunt, H. T Not Stated Pleasant Plains Dentonjj 

Jarrett, J. F Teacher Center Hill R. 6, Lexington}! 

Leek, Chas. F Pastor Thomasville 1st Thomasville 

Lanning, Conrad Not Stated Churchland R. 1, Linwooc 

Maier, F. A Retired Thomasville 1st Thomasvillt 

Martin, G. A Retired Thomasville 1st Thomasville 



Liberty Baptist Association 



7 



MAME „ WORK CHURCH ... • ; ADDRESS 

Matthews, M L Retired Lexington 1st Lexington 

McGee, A. L , Pastor Carolina Avenue Thomasvilie 

Oldham, D. W .Pastor Greenwood .R. 2, High Point 

Pegram, C. M Pastor Reid Street Thomasvilie 

Philpot, Harry M Teacher Lexington let Gainsville, Florida 

Prince, C. C Retired Thomasvilie 1st Thomasvilie 

Roach, E. C Pastor Denton, Lick Creek Denton 

Rhodenhiser, O. W Pastor Wallburg Wallburg 

Philips, V. D Pastor Union Grove ...820 Fieldale St. Winston-Salem 

Phillips, Grover C Pastor Pleasant Plains Bennett 

Snipes, A. R Pastor Abbotts Creek R. 2, High Point 

Swicegood, M. C Pastor Reeds R. 3, Lexington 

Taylor, Robert L Pastor Glennanna Thomasvilie 

Walton, J. O Pastor Mills Home Thomasvilie 

Wall, Zeno Superintendent Mills Home Thomasvilie 

Wilson, S. B .....Retired New Friendship... 1005 Franklin St., Winston-S. 

Young, Chas Pastor Floyd Lexington 

Ministerial Students Ordained to Ministry This Year 

„ , _ xt ts • j l- Horace Kenny Sheets Memorial 

Baker Furney New Friendship Luthor Morohis Reeds 

Bnnkley Clifton Greenwood Inman Stewart Reed Street 

Everhart, Rill Lexington 

Helple, Stewartr Liberty Ministers Lecensed 

Lanning, E. R Lexington 1st M. T. Morton Greeenwood 

SMac^TiaS: educational Director 

Peacock, Gerthie Sheets Memorial Mrs. C. C. Prince Thomasvilie 1st 

Choir Directors 

D. S. Hay worth Abbotts Creek R. 2, High Point 

Wade Jarrett, Center Hill R. 6, Lexington 

Kirby Green Churchland R. 1, Lin wood 

Mrs. C. E. Clyatt Denton Denton 

Lilly Wall , Floyd R. 1, Denton 

G. C. Palmer Holloways R. 6, Lexington 

Mrs. Max Myers High Rock High Rock 

C. A. Sharpe Lake View R. 1, Linwood 

R» L. Palmer Jersey R. 1, Linwood 

Mrs. L. A. Martin Lexington Lexington 

Taylor Myers Erlanger Lexington 

Mrs. Irvin Cooper Sheets Memorial Lexington 

Sarah Wray Liberty R. 2, Thomasvilie 

Ruth Cole Lick Creek R. 1, Denton 

Mallary Carrick Mountain View R. 6, Lexington 

Allen C. Jones New Friendship R. 6, Winston-Salem 

Richard Jarrett Oak Hill Thomasvilie 

Rex Smith '. Pleasant Plains Denton 

Homer Craver Reeds R. 3, Lexington 

Mrs. Elmo Woodleaf Rich Eork R. I, Thomasvilie 

H. F. Grubb Smith Grove R. 4, Salisbury 

Mrs. Conrad Warfford Stoners Grove R. 7, Lexington 

Essie Maie Parker Summerville ... R. 1, Denton 

None Walters Grove 

Mrs. Chas. F. Finch Thomasvilie 1st Box 366, Thomasvilie 

Willie Gilloam Carolina Avenue ..: Thomasvilie 

L. W. Hansel Glennanna Thomasvilie 

Clifton Brinkley Greenwood Thomasvilie 

Mrs. Kenneth Hoyle Mills Home Thomasvilie 

Ira Bryant Reid Street Thomasvilie 

John C. Creed South Side R. 1, High Point 

Miss Veola Evans Union Grove R. 1, Lexington 

Mrs. Ben King Wallburg Wallburg 

Claude Byerly Walters Grove Thomasvilie 

E. L.Davis Welcome Welcome 

Messengers to Association 

I ABBOTTS CREEK: D. S. Hay worth, Margaret Spurgeon, Mrs. Willie Bodenheimer, Mrs 
! Chas. H. Carmichel, Mrs. A. R. Snipes, Mrs. W. P. Davis, Ailene Palmer, Clarence F. Moore, 
I Mrs. Jake Weavil, Mr3. Laura Moore, Mrs. Berta Lyda, Mrs. Ivy Bodenheimer, Mrs. Roy 
I Hay worth, Minnie Hay worth. Shirley Davis, Mr, & Mrs. John Spurgeon, Mrs Ruth Spurgeon, 
Jsckie Davis, Flossie Davis Royal, Mrs. W. T. Hedgeoock. Mrs. Carey Davis, W. P. Davis, 
( Mr. & Mrs. L. B. Moore. 

j CAROLINA AVENUE: Rev. A. L. McGee, ColeenBeck, NatButner,Mr.&Mrs. J.T. Folds, 
| Miss Mable Ingram, Gay Lanier. 

| CENTER HILL. Rev. & Mrs. J. W, Dickens, Hugh L. Miller, Amo. C. Clark, Mrs. Howard 
i Parks, Mrs. J. P. Lopp, Mrs. Bill Loer, Franklin Mabry, Mrs. Hugh Miller, Mrs. Clinton Mobry, 
3 Mrs. D. L. Tysinger, Mrs. Paul Shoemake, Mrs. Wade Holmes, Mrs. D. B. Hunt, Mr. & Mrs. 
I Wade Jarrett, Lynn Jarrett, Mrs. R. B. Yarborough. 



e 



Minutes of the 



CHURCHLAND: Mrs. Graham Barnes, Mrs. Lloyd Fitzgerald, Mrs. J. B. Beck, Mrs. Tom- 
mie Honbarrier, Rev. W. F. Gentry. 

DENTON. W. R. Snider, Robert Carroll, Mrs. H. C. Keever, Mr. & Mrs. R. C. Wall, Mrs. 
J. J. Snider, Rev. & Mrs. E. C. Roach, Mrs. Ben Carroll, Mrs. W. C. Johnson, Joan Carroll, 
A. L. Snider. 

ERLANGER: Mrs. Smith Crow, Mrs. L. A. Carewell, Mrs. Odel Leonard, Mrs. W. T. 
Humphrey. 

FLOYD: Mrs. Dolan Floyd, Mrs. Troy Beanblossom. 

GLENNANNA: Mrs. Jim McCaskel, Avery H. Smith, L. W. Hansel, F. A. Thompson, Mrs. 
Lillian Hair, Mrs. J. L. Spell, Dewey Lyndon, Bill Spell, Rev. & Mrs. Robert Taylor, Roy Jar- 
vis, Mrs. Donna Darvis, Mr. & Mrs. N. A. Cornelison, Mr, & Mrs. T. C. Smith. 

GREENWOOD: Mrs. Ethel Malay, Mr. & Mrs. W. N. Parker, Florence Waters, Rev& Mrs. 
D. W. Oldham, Mrs. Gene Everhart. 

HIGH ROCK: Rev. & Mrs. B. V. Broadway, Mrs. C. L. Morgan, J. M. Carrick. 

HOLLQWAYS: Mrs. Paul Palmer, D. D. Davis, Luther Smith, George Workman, Hugh 
Palmer, G. C. Palmer. 

JERSEY: R. A. Tate, Mr. & Mrs. W. L. Roach, W. J. Loflin, Mrs. R. L. Palmer, Mrs. C. 
A. Smith, Mr. & Mrs. J. N. Penninger, Mrs. W. L. Smith. 

LAKE VIEW: Rev. & Mrs. J. O. Dunn, R. L. Young, Mrs. Luther Snider, Mrs. Lucille 
Myers. Mr. & Mrs. Jake Story, J. O. Dunn Jr.. H. P. Leonard, Floyd Gullet, Mr. & Mrs. Gra- 
ham. Snider, Leslie Snyder, W. P. Gobble. 

LEXINGTON 1st: Mrs. J. O. Wagoner, Ida Potts, Sam Smith, B. C. Philpott, Mr, & Mrs. 
J. E. Starr, Mr, & Mrs. M. L. Mathews, Mrs. E. E. Morgan, Rev. & Mrs. J.Roy Clifford, Mrs. 
W. P. Gobble, John Sink, Miss Roxie Sheets, Mr. & Mrs. B. F. Lee, G. W. Miller, Mrs. John 
F. Loop, W. V. Everhart, Mrs. Spurgeon Ayers, Mrs. Beamer Rarnes, Gena Gallimore, L. A. 
Martin, P. A. Myers. 

LIBERTY: O. F. Hughes, Rev. O. M. Hartman, Mrs. Lena Buie, Mrs. Lucille Buie, W. L. 
Helpler. 

LICK CREEK: Mrs. A. L. Bean, Mr. & Mrs. Dave Kenny, Ernert Wall, Mr."& Mrs. W. 
A. Jarvis. 

MOUNTAIN VIEW: Mrs. Nan Wall, Mrs. Julia Carrick, Harris Wall, Wilma Carrick. 

MILLS HOME: Rev. & Mrs. J. O, Walton, Mnry B. Davis, Viola Hester, Romulus Skaggs, 
Miss Sallie McCracken, Dr. Zeno Wall, Grace M. Battle, Velva Daughtery. 

NEW FRIENDSHIP: Mrs. N. L. Everhart, Rev. & Mrs. S. B. Wilson, Mrs. Gather Lewie, 
Mr, & Mrs. C. F. Motsinger, Mrs. S. O. Hinkle, Rev. & Mrs E. F. Baker, Mr. & Mrs. Haywood 
Lambeth. 

OAK HILL: Mrs. Frank Pearson, Mrs. Barrett Harris, Mrs. Raymond Underwood, Mrs. 
Dewey Wilson, Gladys Twine, Mrs. Brad Sechriest. 
PLEASANT PLAINS: Mr. & Mrs. Grover Phillips. 

REEDS: Mrs. A. R. Craver, Mrs. Addie Craven, Mrs. T. H. Michael, Mrs. W. O. Lanning, 
Mr. & Mrs. R. W. Hege, Mrs. Golden Koontz, Rev. & Mrs. Vann Carroll, Rev. V. H. Harrell, 
Mrs. J. L. Tempee. 

REID STREET: Rev. C.M.Pegram, Mrs.S. A.Renegar, Mrs. L. Hinkle, Mrs. Virgil Myers. 
RICH FORK: T. H. Small, Mrs. Arther Hedrick, Rev. & Mrs J. Harvey Clark. Mrs. Fuller 
Myers, Grady Kanoy. 

SHEETS MEMORIAL: Mr. & Mrs. Ed Anderson, Betty Freeman, Ottis Bean, Mrs. Earl 
Lookabill, Mr. & Mrs. Marvin Smith, Mrs. O. C. Kenny, Mrs. J. W. Byers, Mrs. V. R. Stroud' 
Mrs. W. R. Harris, Miss Vada Palmer, Mrs. M. R. Frank, Rev. & Mrs. J.T.Davis. Elizabeth 
Ann Williams, Nellie Weisner, Lou ise Bean, Mrs. Woorow Willams, Oscar Beck, Mrs. Irvin 
Cooper, Crowford Miller, Lewis, Brown, Mrs. Woodrow Ferguson, Mary Agnes Brown, Mrs, 
J. E. Gallimore, Mrs, T. J. Peters, Mary Swing, Cecli Wright, Mrs. Tom Johnson, Mrs. Myrtle 
Malay. Mrs. Jim Johnson, Mrs. Ed Bell, Mrs. June Snyder. 

SMITH GROVE: Mrs. Troy Lanning, Mrs. Herman Orrell Mrs.RoyOrrell, Mrs. J.G. Allred. 

SOUTH SIDE: Rev. & Mrs. S. D. Baker, Mrs. Sam Pierce, Henry Myers, Mrs. Ada Hill- 

SUMMER VILLE: Rev. C. S. Young, Mrs. Henry Parker, Jr., Mrs. Will Davis, Mrs. Luther 
Buie, Mrs. E. L. Newsom, Mrs. L. C, Carrick, Mrs. N. L. Lookabill, Mrs. A. E. Henderson, 
Mrs. Shelton Surratt. 

TAYLORS GROVE: None. 

THOMASVILLE 1st: Dr. F. P Covington, Rev. & Mrs. Chas. F. Leek, Rev. F. A. Maier, 
W. H, Deaton, Mrs. R. G. Jennings, Mrs. Chas, C. Prince, Dr. & Mrs. G. A. Martin. 

UNION GROVE: Rev. & Mrs. V. D. Poillips, Mr. & Mrs. Avery White. 

WALLBURG: Mrs. H. N. Petroff, Mrs. O. W. Rhodenhiser, Mr.& Mrs. Maskey M. Smith, 
J. W. King. 

WALTERS GROVE: Mrs. John Yates, Mrs. J. A. Gallimore, Mrs. J. A. Surratt, Mr.&Mrs. 
Gourley, Mrs. David Surratt. 

WELCOME : Mrs. Carrie Haynes, Mrs. H. L. Wilkes, Mrs. O. S. Haynes, Mrs. W. S. Disher. 

VISITORS: W.K.McGee, H. M. Stroup, L. L. Carpsnter, Mrs. M. L. Kennedy, Mrs. Delia 
Potts, E. H. Hooper, Mrs. D. F. Conrad, M. A. Huggins, Betty Bodenheimer, James M. Gregg, 
Mrs. C. C, Manning, Chas. Williams, Mrs. A. R. Brothers, Mrs JLee Smith, L. Vernon Connell, 
J. C. Gwaltney, Jimmie Martin, Mrs. Earlie Martin, Mrs. Lothar Cecil, W. H. Walton, Tom 
W. Bray, Mrs. Albert Humphrey, Elizabeth Loflin. Mrs. J. E. Starr, Jacqueline Bailey, Patsy 
Hughes, Margaret Black, M. H. Kendall, William Gallman, Marlene Newsom, Dorthy Davis, 
Ted Hughes, Barbara Lou Shoal, Tommie L. Honbarrier, Nolan Teague, J. L. Kirk, Ida Layne, 
Carolyn Eagle, Jane Armentront. 



Liberty Baptist Association 



Proceedings 

One Hundred and Seventeenth Annual Meeting 

Of the 

liberty Baptist assdciatidn 

Tuesday and Wednesday, September 27-28, 1949 
Held With 
g>tjwta jUfamortai Baptist QHfurrlj 

Lexington, N. C. 

Theme: "Living and Working for Christ Today" 
FIRST DAY 

1. Tuesday September 27, 1949, at 9:45 a. m. the Liberty Baptist 
Association assembled in its One Hundred and Seventeenth annual 
session with Sheets Memorial Baptist Church, Lexington, N. C. 

2. In the absence of the Moderator, Rev. J. O. Walton, Vice-Moder- 
ator called the body to order for the transaction of business. 

3. The opening song was "All Hail The Power." Devotion was con- 
ducted by Rev. W. F. Gentry, Pastor of Churchland Church. Scrip- 
ture used, John 5:34-37, 9:4. 

4. A. L. Snider, Associational Clerk, of Denton Church, read the 
report of the Program Committee. The report was adopted, subject 
to any changes deemed advisable as the meeting proceds. 

Report off Program Committee 

TUESDAY MORNING 

9:45 Devotion . W. F. Gentry 

10:00 Report of Program Committee A. L. Snider 

10:05 Roll Call and Appointment of Committees 

10:25 Report on Church Music Mrs. E. E. Witherspoon 

10:40 Address on the Deacon B. C. Philpott 

! 10:55 Report on State of Churches E. F. Baker 

1 11:20 Worship Period, Music led by Carey Davis 

111:30 Sermon J. O. Walton 

11:10 Adjournment for Dinner. 

TUESDAY AFTERNOON 

1:30 Devotion C. M. Pegram 

1:45 Report on Christian Education O. W. Rhodenhiser 

2:25 Report on Training Union G. C. Lewis 

2:50 Orphanage Dr. Zeno Wall 

3:15 State Missions J. Harvey Clark 

Address by M. A. Huggins, State Secretary 
4 :00 Ad j ournment 

WEDNESDAY MORNING 

9:45 Devotion _ Robert Taylor 

10:00 Sunday Schools Mrs. Mary G. Grice 

10:20 Report of Committees 
10:45 Music 

10:50 Associational Missionary W. Van Carroll 

11:05 Baptist Hospital ___Dr. Furman Covington 

11:30 Christian Literature L. A. Martin 



TO 



Minutes of the 



11:50 Woman's Missionary Union Mrs. Beamer Barnes 

12:15 Ad j ournment f or D inner 

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON 

1:30 Devotion D. W. Oldham 

1:45 Public Morals A. L. McGee 

2:05 Ministers Retirement J. W. Dickens 

2:15 American Bible Society Mrs. Grace Battle 

2:25 Home Missions J. Roy Clifford 

2 :30 Miscellaneous Business (Obituaries) 

2:45 Foreign Missions E. C. Roach 

2:50 Address Dr. A. S. Hale 

Pastor 1st, Church, High Point 

3:35 Ad j ournment 

E. F. Baker, Program Chm. 
J. O. Walton, Vice-Moderator 
A. L. Snider, Clerk 

5. Visitors recognized at this time were: Rev. M. L. Matthews, Rev. 
T. W. Bray, Rev. Nolan Teague, Rev. W. K. Walton, and Rev. Kirk, 
S tailings Memorial, Salisbury. 

5a. Recognition of new pastors: Rev. W. F. Gentry, Rev. J. T. Davis, 
Rev. A. R. Snipes, Rev. C. M. Pegram, and Rev. Joe Woodson, Chap- 
lain, Mills Home. 

5b. Roll of churches called by Clerk and all were represented except 
Taylors Grove. 

6. Appointment of committees read at this time. 

List of Committees 

Resolution Committee J. Lacy Buie Liberty 

A. L. McGee, Chm. ..Carolina Ave. Miss Sailie S. Berrier Union Grove 

S. D. Baker „ South Side Mrs - R - Monsees _ — Stoners Grove 

J. V. Dunn Lake View Committee to Name Persons 

V. D. Phillips _ Union Grove To Bring Reports Next Year 

O. M. Hartman __ Wei come, Liberty _ ___ , - „ 

J. W. Dickens, Chm. __ .Center Hill 

Committee to Nominate A. R. Graver Reeds j 

Officers for Next Year Sam J. Smith Lexington 1st 

E. F. Baker, Chm. _ .New Friendship Harvey Clark Rich Fork 

Mrs. Ben Carrol Denton C. F. Motsinger New Friendship 

(j. A. Martin Thomasville 1st 

W. H. Lomax Churchland 



Miss Roxie Sheets Lexington 1st 



Committee on 
Time, Place and Preacher 



E. C. Roach, Chm Denton 

Committee on Finance q. R. Bean .Sheets Memorial 

MissSallieMcCracken,Chm.MillsH. J.J. Embry _____Reid Street 

B. C. Philpott Lexington 1st G. C. Orrell Smith Grove 

Dan S. Hayworth Abbotts Creek Mrs. Charles Sigmon ____Lake View: 

G C Palmer Ho11 ?^ Committee to Prepare 

Lee Roach Jersey Progr am for Next Year 

Committee on Obituaries j. R oy Clifford, Chm. .Lexington 1st! 

Chas. Young, Chm Summerville O. W. Rhodenhiser Wallburgj 

Mrs. Z. L. Morgan High Rock S. B. Laws ____T homasville 1st 

7. The following report was prepared by Mrs. E E Wit her spoon and 
presented by Rev. M. L. Matthews, retired minister of Lexington 1st 
Church. Report was adopted. 



Liberty Baptist Association 



Report on Church Music 

Since we, as members of the Liberty Baptist Association, are res- 
ponsible for the conservation and growth of music in our churches, what 
can or what ought we to do toward more adequate music programs in 
our churches? We are interested. We have shown a vital interest by 
giving to music such a large part of time in our gatherings and by giving 
it such a prominent place in our programs of service in our individual 
churches. Although it would be worthwhile we are not primarily concern- 
ed for improvement solely for cultural purposes, but as to whether or not 
our music and the manner in which we use it contribute to the spiritual 
development of our people. 

The ideal of church music is found in its function. At the heart of 
church music must be the sense of the divine, of goodness and righteous- 
ness, of the Almighty, the Eternal: the sense of exaltation of human 
life to the divine, and accompanying this the feeling of humility into which 
such a sense leads us. There is in all true church music a spirit of ador- 
ation, aspiration and reverence, and a sense of assurance. To aid the soul 
to become more keenly and deeply conscious of itself, its supreme personal 
quality, its high and enduring worth, is the ideal of church music. This 
is its mission. It is for this reason that music has been admitted to the 
House of God. 

The attainment of this idea is something that we all need to work 
at patiently, purposefully and intelligently. We each have a responsibility 
whether we be congregation, choir or pastor. We all constitute a body 
of worshipers. Our individuality is lost in the function of our office. No 
individual or group stands forth or is unduly prominent for church music- 
ians are simply leaders or agents in worship. The conception of the service, 
the conduct, and the attitude on the part of members of the congregation 
are matters of essential influence. The responsibility, to a large degree, 
is with the pastor. 

Always, and in every instance there must be sincerity as the basis 
of every true use of church music. This is the touchstone. Sincerity, ut- 
ter sincerity, is an essential feature in religion, and it should be the in- 
dispenable criterion in the field of church music. Sincerity of the highest 
order should characterize the worship and services of the church — and 
this, of course, includes both the character of the music and the manner 
of its use. Through its power of expression and impression, church music 
should be the means of making religion attractive and meaningful in its 
true, exalting character. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Mary A. Wither spoon 

8. Song, "Majestic Sweetness," led by Carey Davis of Abbotts Creek. 

I 9. ADDRESS ON THE DEACON. This address was made by Bro. 
\B. C. Philpott of Lexington 1st Church. This was not a written report. 

\ 10. Report on State of Churches made by Rev. E. F. Baker, Pastor 
mf New Friendship Church. This report was adopted. 

State of Churches 

I : The reports of the churches to the Liberty Association this year 
f indicate a year of achievements in different ways, especially better Build- 
fings, equipment, and finances, also they give us a general idea of the work 
f accomplished by different organizations. 

I There are 14 churches that do not have a Train'ng Union. There 
[is enrolled in Training Union 1386, or a gain over last year of 59 enroll- 
ed with no new Union the past year. 

The W. M. U. has 120 units reported. Last year 129 units were re- 
j| ported. A loss of 9. However the report shows an increase in members 
p of 185 for the past year. 



12 



Minutes of the 



Our Sunday School report this year is very encouraging with an 
enrollment of 8,967 or a gain of 1,137 over last years report. 

There is one church that has no Sunday School. Most of the ■ above J 
mentioned gains were made in young people and Adults which is especial-/ 
ly gratifying. 171 more in Sunday School than church roll. 

Twenty Sunday Schools have an enrollment of more than the church 
roll. Leaving 15 with a larger church roll than Sunday School enroll- 
ment which is a gain of 4 over last year. 

Union Grove Sunday School made the greatest gain in average at- 
tendance of the church school from 30 last year to 65 this year. 

Of the 35 churches there is now 23 having preaching every Sunday. 
A gain of one over last year. 4 churches report no revivals or additions, 
6 churches report no Baptisms, 31 churches report 508 Baptisms and 284 
other additions mak'ng a total of 792 additions. Our losses were 515/ 
leaving us a gain of only 277 this year or a total 8796 members. We are; 
171 behind our gains of last year. 

There is only one church in the Association that gave more for Mis- 
sions than was used at Home. Mills Home spent $3000. at home and gave 
$5000. for Missions. 

Our gifts for local causes this year $222,490.29 gain $19.29. 

Our gifts for Missions this year $66,343.00 gain $10,057.89. 

Our gifts to the Orphanage this year $10,781.36 gain 971.33. 

We have reported this year a financial gain of $16,911.49 over last ' 
year of a total of $288,833.29 the greatest financial report ever made by, I 
this Association. 

There are only 16 churches made a pledge to our Associational Mis-; 
sionary. Their pledges are insufficient for the great needs. 

However there are 22 churches paid their pledges the past year & 
paid a very small amount and 5 have never a cent for this worthy cause. 

This year we have 14 churches sending 5 cents per member for 
minutes and associational expenses. 2 churches sent 10 cents per member 
and some less than 2 cents per member. 

According to the church reports our financial gain has been veryf 
gratifying, however we have been far short in winning souls to Christ. 
According to your reports it has taken more than 31 people to win one 
soul to Christ. What have you done to win one? 

Respectfully submitted, 
E. F. Baker 



10A Report of Treasurer 

Balance on hand September 1, 1949 $ 77.67 

Minute Fund 399.05 

$476:72 

DISBURSEMETNS 

Printing Minutes (1,100) ___ $190.00 

Printing Programs 12.00 

Printing Envelopes 5.35 

Postage 10.63 

Telephone Calls .76 

Paper 2.25 

Typing 12.00 

Clerk-Treasurer 125.00 

$157.99 

Balance on hand September 26, 1949 - 118.73 



$476.72 

Respectfully, 
A. L. Snider, Clerk-Treasurer 



Liberty Baptist Association 



13 



Financial Report 



Balance carried over from last year $ 4.00 

Received from Churches: 

Wallburg 2.00 

Reid Street 2.00 

Center Kill 2.47 

Erlanger 2.00 

Greenwood 2.00 

Churchland 2.00 

Mill Home 2.00 

Liberty 2.00 

New Friendship 2.00 

Reeds 2.00 

$24.47 

Paid Out for October, November, December: 

Stamps $1.50 

Postals 1.00 

Stencils .15 

Envelopes and paper .31 

Associational Manuels - 1.60 

$4.56 —4.56 

Paid out for January, February, March: $19.91 

Associational Report Forms $ .15 

Manuels 3.09 

Telephone Call .31 

Postals 3.45 

Postage .19 

Envelopes .05 

$7.24 —7.24 

Paid out for April, May, June: $12.67 

Postage $ .15 

Postals 2.00 

Telephone Call .31 

$2.46 —2.46 

Paid out for July, August: $10.21 
Postals $2.00 —2.00 

Cash Balance on hand September 1st $8.21 



11. At this time the Vice-Moderator, Rev. J. O. Walton, in the ab- 
sence of a second vice-moderator, ask the clerk to preside until the 
noon hour. 

12. A period of worship, led by Bro. Carey Davis, was given at this 
time. The music rendered was by the Glee Club of Hasty High 
School. The numbers rendered were very inspirational. 

13. The annual sermon was brought by Rev. J. O. Walton, Pastor of 
Mills Home Church. Scripture used for subject was 1st John, fifth 
chapter. After the sermon the meeting adjourded to meet back at 
1:30 p. m. for evening session. 

TUESDAY EVENING 

14. Meeting opened by singing "When I Survey the Wonderous Cross." 
The devotional was conducted by Rev. C. M. Pegram, Pastor Reed 
Street Church, Thomasville. Scripture used was selected verses from 
John, 16, 17th chapters. The subject was, ''The Hour Has Come." 



14 



Minutes of the 



15. Report on Christian Education was prepared by Rev. O. W. Rho- 
denhiser, Pastor of Wallburg Church. The report was adopted with- 
out reading and the time was given to speakers from colleges. Prof. \ 
R. H. Kendall, of Mars Hill College, discussed this topic. 

Report on Christian Education 

The following practical suggestions are given to Baptist people who 
may be interested in helping to further the program of Christian education ; 
in our colleges: 

(1) Find and direct to these colleges the outstanding and most cap- 
able young men and women in your community. If we are to be forced 
to limit the mumber that can be trained in these colleges, we must of 
necessity give this training to those who can benefit most by it. This mat- 
ter of finding and guiding these young people is a particular responsibility 
of pastors, Sunday school superintendents, and other leaders in our church. 
Don't miss an opportunity to help in this most important work. 

(2) See that these colleges and the work that they are undertaking . 
to do are kept before the young people who are thinking about going . 
to college. This can best be done through special programs on Christian 
education and our Baptist schools and an occasional emphasis by the 
pastor and other church leaders. Graduates of these colleges living in the 
various communities of the state have a special obligation in letting the 
students know more about the colleges. 

(3) If we try to find the most worthy students and convince them of I 
the importance of going to a Christian college, we must help them to 
understand the necessity for Baptist people supporting these colleges 
financially. We must help them to understand that these colleges cannot 
receive support from the state and must be helped by the churches if 1 
they are to be real educational institutions. One of the finest services that 
any church can provide in its support of Christian education is to see 
that every worthy student, regardless of his financial condition, has an 
opportunity to go to college if he so desires. It does a church good to 
provide the money necessary for a fine boy or girl to go to a goodj 
Baptist college. This special opportunity can be found in almost every 
Baptist church in North Carolina. ' .1 

(4) As we strive to find the students and the needed financial sup-' 
port, let us not overlook the fact that we usually help those institutions: 
and people whom we love sufficiently to make them the objects of our 
daily prayers. If in the place of criticism we could substitute prayer and 1 
help for those who are trying to carry on the program of Christian educa-f 
tion, we would see a new day in the life of our denomination. On every 1 
hand in our world today we find men and women who believe in and want 1 
to support education, but we must go one step further and help them to 
want Christian education in the truest sense. 

The above suggestions are but representative of the many ways in 
which we may bring about a new day among North Carolina Baptists as 
they give greater emphasis to Christian education in our colleges. 
Respectfully submitted, 

O. W. Rhodenkiser 

16. Miscellaneous business was discussed at this time. 

17. Rev. G rover Phillips made a motion to limit the term or office] 
of moderator to two years This motion was adopted unanimously.] 
This necessitated the change of hy-laws as follows in article 4 that 
the moderator should be elected for a limit of two years only. 

18. Report on Training Union was prepared by its Associational 
Directer, G. C. Lewis, and presented by Rev. Vann Carroll, Associa-, 
tional Missionary. The report was adopted. 



Liberty Baptist Association 



is 



Report on Training Union 

The Associational Baptist Training Union has recently finished another 
ear of service to the churches in our association. Realizing that in order 

be of service to our churches and to know how to conduct the activities 

1 the Associational Baptist Training Union. We of the Liberty Association 
tivited the finest and best instructor to be found in our state to teach us 
The Associational Baptist Training Union Manual." The instructor was 
Ar Harvey T. Gibson of Raleigh, state secretary of the Baptist Tram- 
ng' Union. The Pilot Mtn. Associational B. T. U. met with us at the 
.exington First Church for the study course. This began our year of work. 

THE MEETINGS OF THE ASSOCIATION B. T. U. 
The Associational B. T. U. has met in Quarterly Executive Com- 
nittee Meeting at the First Baptist Church in Lexington. These meetings 
vere in October, January, April and July, to plan and discuss the work 
or each quarter. The meetings were well attended by our Associational 
Dflicers and Leaders. 

The Associational Officers and Leaders Councils have been conducted 
;ach quarter. In these council meetings some of the best work of the 
rear has been done because here is where the Cream of the Crop of our 
"hurch Leadership meets to solve problems and receive information re- 
garding the Baptist Training Union. We have moved back and forth a- 
:ross our Association, conducting these Officers and Leaders Councils 
neeting in the following Churches: On November 22, 1948 Lexington 
First Church with 14 churches represented and 78 people present. On 
February 21, 1949, we met with Greenwood, with 14 churches represented 
md 79 people present. On May 23, 1949, we met with Reid Street Baptist 
;hurch with 10 churches represented and 47 people present. On August 15, 
194^', we met with Sheets Memorial Baptist Church, had 11 churches rep- 
sented and 65 present. Taking an average for the year, we find that we 
pave averaged having 12 churches represented and 65 people present for the 
Quarterly Officers and Leaders Councils. 

The Associational B. T. U. Mass Meetings have been conducted each 
Quarter in the following Churches. On December 6, 1949, we met with 
Rich Fork Baptist Church with 17 churches represented and 363 people 
'present. At this meeting we launched our program for the year. Mr. O W. 
;Rodenhiser, pastor of Wallburg Baptist Church, brought an inspiring and 
Challenging message to the youth of our association. On March 28, 1949, 
;#e met with Lexington First Church and had 14 churches represented and 
1 54 present. At this meeting our Associational Tournament Elimination's 
jlvere conducted. On June 20, 1949, we met with Thonasville First Church 
ind had 15 churches represented and 105 people present. At this meeting 
We had the Youth of our association as speakers on our program proving 
m our selves that we do not have to go outside of our churches in the 
Association to find talent and speakers for our programs. On September 
19, 1949, we met with Erlanger Baptist Church. Had 15 churches rep- 
jjented and 137 people present. At this meeting we heard the report of the 
NJominating Committe. Mr. E. F. Baker brought the inspirational message, 
dosing with a dedication service, that was both beautiful and inspiring. 
Dur average for the year is: average churches represented, 15. Average 
llittendance, 190 at the Quarterly Mass Meetings. These high attendance 
[figures did not just happen — but are due to the interest and enthusiasm 
Generated by the fine leadership of our pastors, general directors, officers, 
jind Leaders of twenty-three Baptist Training Unions of our Association. 

TOURNAMENT WORK 

As previously reported the Associational Elimination Contest was 
jfonducted at the March Mass Meeting. The following were declared 



16 



Minutes of the 



winners and represented the Liberty Associational at the Regional Meet-| 
ing in Winston- Salem in early May. 

Junior Memory Work : 

Reba Bates * * .. ... Sheets Memorial! 

Romona Stillwell * * A Rich Fork 

Lawana Brown * * New Friendship 

Janet Pope s New Friendship 

Vera Mahaffey * — New Friendship 

Intermediate Sword Drill : 

Ruth Young Sheets Memorial 

T. L. Hombarier Churchland 

Lorene Beck : Center Hill 

Better Speakers Tournament : 
Ruth Sechrest Rich Fork 

Adult Bible Reading: 
S. B. Wilson _ New Friendship 

Hymn Festival : 

First Church Lexington 

(* Denotes Regional Winners) (* * Denotes State Winners) 

Four of our junior girls were declared regional winners. Three of them 
represented The Liberty Association in the state finals and were declared 
state winners. They were Lawana Brown, Romona Stillwell, and Reba 
Bates — Brown, at Seaside, Stillwell and Bates, at Fruitland. 

EDUCATIONAL AND EXTENSION 
Youth Week and Christian Home Week were again sponsored by 
the B. T. U. Several of our churches in the association participated. 
Daily Bible Reading and Prayer Meeting attendance has been stressed all 
year and reports on these two phases of the work have been very encour-j 
aging. Many of our Training Unions have realized the importance of an 
annual Study Course and have reported fine results. Others have plans for 
a Study Course in the near future. One complete Training Union has 
been organized. A survey of all churches in the Association has been started; 
and will be completed soon. "Gene Sm'th" Young People's Leader has taught: 
Study Courses in many of our churches. One new Young Peoples Union has 
been organized. Another is now in the organization stage and will sooni; 
be working. 

REPORT OF NOMINATING COMMITEE 
This report made at the September mass meeting ot the B. T. U. 
and the following officers and leaders are recommended for the year 
1949 and 1950: 

General Director G. C. Lewis, New Friendship; 

Assoc. Director J. Curry Regan, Reid Street 

Pastor Advisor J. Harvey Clark, Rich Fork 

Sec'y. and Treas. Miss Polly Swaim, Wallburg? 

Assoc : Sec'y and Treas. Miss Dorcus Clinard. Rich Fork 

Chorister Carey J. Davis, Abbotts Creeks 

Pianist Miss Shirley Davis, Abbotts Creel 

Adult Leader M. F. Brown, New Friendshij 

Young People's Leader Gene Smith, Carolina Ave. 

Intermediate Leader Miss Troy Jarrett, Center Hill* 

Junior Leader Mrs. E. F. Baker, New Friendship 

Story Flour Leader ... Miss Othelia Thomas 

Group 1, Leader W. H. Lomax, Churchland 

Group 2, Leader W. H. Palmer, Abbotts Creek 

Group 3, Leader Miss Florence Waters, Greenwood 

Your General Director has received fine and loyal support from 
his officers and during the past year. The entire organization joins him 



Liberty Baptist Association 



17 



in thanking you for the grand support you have given to the plans 
and programs suggested to you— The state of the Training Union is good. 
Respectfully submitted, 
G. C. Lewis, Associational Director 

19. Song, "Amazing Grace." 

20. The Orphanage Report was presented by Dr. Zeno Wall, Super- 
intendent of Mills Home. This report was adopted. 

Report on Baptist Orphanage 

Since the establishment of the Baptist Orphanage on August 5, 1885, 
thousands of homeless boys and girls have been cared for in the two 
homes. Last year 793 children were helped in the Mills Home, Kennedy 
Home, in foster homes and in homes with their mothers. Twenty-two more 
children were cared for than in the previous year. 

NEW BUILDINGS 

A new cottage — one that is costing over sixty-six thousand dollars — 
is soon to be opened at Kennedy Home which will enable 24 more children 
to be cared for; and on February 10th the new freezer plant was opened 
there, the one at Mills Home having been opened last fall. 

IMPROVEMENTS 

Many of the buildings are old, hence have to be repaired from time 
to time. But it is hoped that after this year most of the buildings will 
be in such good shape that but few repairs will have to be made during 
the next five years. On account of these repairs, the erection of new build- 
ings and high cost of living it was necessary to spend last year fifty- 
six thousand dollars more than received. This had to come from the re- 
serve fund which had been laid aside for a "rainy day" — such a time as 
this. It appears now that the same will occur this year ; that more than 
fifty thousand dollars will be spent than will be received. 

ADEQUATE SUPPORT 

If the Orphanage is to continue its outstanding service to the hundreds 
of homeless children who knock at its doors, a more adequate support 
must be given. If the Sunday Schools and churches will increase the a- 
mounts set aside for the Orphanage in their budgets, and if the other Sun- 
day schools and churches will continue their once a month offerings and 
make an inspiring Thanksgiving offering, the work can be carried on 
without sustaining a loss at the end of the year. 

ORPHANAGE REPRESENTATIVE 

Our Orphanage is asking that each association elect a representative 
who will take an active interest in this work, urging each church and Sun- 
day school to contribute regularly to the support of the Orphanage and 
that a worthy offering be made at cr near Thanksgiving; and to have 
a club of Charity and Children formed in each church. 

The Mills Home church has carried on an active program during 
the year through its Sunday School, B. T. U. and missionary organiza- 
tions. There were 85 baptisms during the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Zeno Wall 

21. State Mission report was prepared by Rev. J. Harvey Clark, Pas- 
tor of Rich Fork Church. The report was adopted. 

Report on State Missions 

Since the organization of The Baptist State Convention State Mis- 
sions has been central in the thinking of Baptist life in North Carolina. 
Baptists are a powerful denomination today, and so far as one can see this 
is true because during the years there has been in operation a farily ag- 
gressive State Mission program. 



13 



Minutes of the 



Most of the churches in North Carolina have been aided in one way 
or another through State Mission program. Within the past fifteen years 
some four hundred new churches have come into existence, and State 
Missions has helped in one way or another perhaps three-fourths of them. 

For a hundred years aid has been giving in helping on pastors' salaries 
in new churches located in strategic centers without, however, neglecting 
those churches in sparsely settled areas. Speaking in business terms, these 
investments have brought rich dividends because every activity which 
Baptists support through the State Mission program has touched the 
churches more directly than have the activities of other agencies. 

As the Denomination has grown so has the State Mission Program. 
There are now nineteen different activities in this program. May I list 
them for you. 

S Sunday School Work 

T Training Union Work 

A Assemblies, Summer 

T Teaching Activities (Visual Education, Radio, Etc.) 
E Evangelism (City and Associational-wide Revivals) 

M More New Churches and help to weak ones 

I Indians, Work Among 

S Schools for Ministers 

S Silent People, Work Among 

I Inter-racial Activities 

O Other Activities (Allied Church League, Rural work, Etc.) 

N Neglected Areas (Lots for New Churches) 

S Student Work among 15,000 Baptist Students. 

How is this great program supported? State Missions receives 13% 
out of the total gifts through the Cooperative Program. In addition to 
that some money is received through the Sunday School Board to promote 
the departments of Sunday School, Training Union, and Student Work. 
Then the Woman's Missionary Union makes a special offering in Septem- 
ber. Then October is STATE MISSION MONTH. During that month, 
and particularly on the last two Sundays the people are asked to make a 
special offering through the Sunday Schools and churches for all these 
activities. 

Let us all remember that State Missions is not ONE object but NINE- 
TEEN. One's offering, therefore, would need to be a dollar if only 5 
cents is given to each activity. 

The purpose of State Missions, then, simply stated, is to take North 
Carolina for Christ. The needs are great. The challenge is before us. En- 
abled by the grace of God it can be realized. "The harvest truly is great, 
but the labourers are few ; pray ye therefore the Lord of the harvest, that 
he would send forth labourers into his harvest." Luke 10 :2 " I heard the 
voice of the Lord saying, whom shall I send, and who will go for us? 
Then said I, Here am I ; send me." Isa. 6 :8. 

Respectfully submitted, 
J. H. Clark 

21A. Bro. M. A. Huggins, Secretary Baptist State Convention, spoke 
at this time, using as his subject, "North Carolina for Christ." After 
this message, adjourned to meet Wednesday morning at 9:45. 
Benediction by Dr. Zeno Wall. 

WEDNESDAY MORNING 

22. Meeting was called to order at 9:45 by Vice- Moderator, Rev. J. 
O. Walton of Mills Home Church. Opening song, "Love Divine." 

23 Rev. Robert Taylor, Pastor of Glennanna Church, was in charge 
of tho devotional. Scripture reading from Romans. Subject was, 
"A Living Sacrifice." 



Liberty Baptist Association 



19 



24. The Sunday School report was prepared and brought by Miss 
Pauline Roach of Denton. It was discussed by Rev. Vann Carroll. 
This report was adopted. 

Report on Sei^day Schools 

Jesus was the greatest teacher of all time. He put teaching in the 
great comm ssion when he said "Go ye therefore, and teach ail nations" 
(Matt. 28:19.) He taught his disciples, then sent them out to be teachers 
also. Paul made great use of teaching. He stayed at Corinth one year 
Sad six months "Teaching the word of God among them." (Acts 18:11.) 
He stayed at Ephesus two year and used the school of Tyrannus. And 
in second Timothy 2 :2 he states, "The things that thou hast heard of me 
among many witnesses, the same commit thou to faithful men, who shall 
be able to^teach others also.,' It is clear therefore, if we are true to Christ 
and his purpose we must put irgh value on Christian Education. 

Dr. J. M. Frost states in Ins bock "The School Of The Church," 
that the work of the Sunday School is three fold : First, Teach the 
scriptures ; Second, Teach the scriptures ; Third, Teach the scriptures. 
The business of the Sunday School is to reach the people and teach the 
Bible. The greatest misfortune of our time is that so many have neglected 
the challenge which is offerred through our Sunday Schools. 

Last March from the nineteenth to the twenty-fifth a Sunday School 
enlargement campaign was held in our Association. Thirty eight workers 
under the supervision of the Baptist State Convention served in twenty 
eight of our churches. The highest class attendance during the week 
was 956. In these twenty eight Sunday Schools the enrollment was 7,327. 
The average attendance during the quarter just before the campaign was 
4,330. The Total number of possibilities for the twenty eight churches 
was 13,630. The number of unsaved nine years old and above was 3.900. 
As a result of the campaign eighty three new workers were enlisted and 
sixty new classes were formed. The attendance the first Sunday of the 
campaign was 4,629. The second Sunday saw the attendance go up to 
5,012. The resident church membership reported during the census "taken 
was 6,067 with a Sunday School enrollment of 7,327. 

From October the first 1948 to June the first 1949 there were ap- 
proximately 550 book awards in The Liberty Association to leaders in 
twenty eight churches, there also have been four Associational Sunday 
School Meetings during the year. Mr. J. D. Fraley, Mills Home, Thomas- 
ville is the capable Associational Sunday School Superintendent. 

It is a great pleasure to report that twenty six of our churches held 
Daily Vacation Bible Schools this year. The total enrollment was 2,831 
with an average attendance of 2,438. Next year our aim should be to 
have all thirty five of our churches cooperating in this great endeavor. 

The following facts are of vital interest to all of us. The enrollment 
in all the Sunday Schools of the Association this year was 8,967. The 
average attendance this year was 4 651. There was a gain in enrollment 
over last year of 1,137. The attendance over last year was 400. Out of 
the thirty five churches there are 15 nurseries and one cradle roll. 

As we look over the wonderful progress that has been made this year 
we still must keep these 3,900 unsaved persons in mind and say with the 
scriptures that surely "The field is still white unto Harvest." 

Respectfully submitted, 

Pauline Roach 

25. Visitors recognized at this time were: Rev. V. H. Harrell, and Dr. 
W. K. McGee. 

Report of Committees 

25. Rev. J. W. Dickens brought a report on persons to make reports 
for next year. 



20 



Minutes of the 



Committee on Reports for Next Year Recommends the Following: 

Christian Education J. T. Davis Sheets Memorial 

Training Union Associational Director 

Orphanage Romulus Skaggs Mills Home 

State Missions C. C. Eddinger Stoners Grove 

Sunday Schools Associational Superintendent 

Baptist Hospital Chas. F. Leek Thomasville 1st 

Christian Literature Miss Louise McMillan Mills Home; 

Woman's Missionary Union Associational President 

Public Morals W. L. Gentry Churcbland 

Minister's Retirement C. M. Pegram Reed Street 

American Bible Society Miss SrJlie McCrackan Mills Home 

Home Missions Mrs. C. C. Wall Lexington 1st 

Foreign Missions Mrs. J. B. Powell Erlanger 

Church Music Mrs. C. C. Prince Thomasville 1st 

State of Churches J. Roy Clifford Lexington 1st 

Respectfully submitted, 
J. W. Dickens, Chm. 

26 A. Report of Committee to nominate officers for next year was 
presented by Dr. G. A. Martin, of Thomasville 1st Church. 

Moderator J. O. Walton 

Vice-Moderator Sam J. Smith 

Clerk-Treasurer A. L. Snider 

ASSOCIATIONAL 
Executive Committee Missionary Committee 

J. O. Walton J. O. Walton, Chm. 

A. L. Snider A. L. Snider, Sec.-Treas. 

E. F. Baker E. F. Baker 

CM. Pegram A. R. Snipes 

C. V. Teague J. Roy Clifford 

Chas. F. Leek J. D. Fraley 

W. H. Lomax W. H. Lomax 

W. F. Gentry 

Sunday School Superintendent (Associational) W. H. Lomax 

Training Union Director " G. C. Lewis 

Song Leader " Carey Davis 

Pianist " Miss Shirley Davis 

Orphanage Representative " C. C. Wall 

Chm. Promotion Executive Com. _ " ^__E. F. Baker 

Recorder Representative " Miss Dorcas Clinard 

Respectfully submitted, 
E. F. Baker, Chm. 

26B. Report of finance was presented by Miss Sallie McCracken of \ 
Mills Home. Report was adopted. 

We recommend the following: 

1. That each church in the association try to make some contribution to- 
ward the associational work, making the support 100 per cent by the 
churches. 

2. That the association operate in the future on a t unified budget; that is, 
for the expense of the clerk, missionary, minutes, Sunday school, 
B. T. U.. W. M. U., and any other objects that come under the super- 
vision of the association. 

3. We repeat with emphasis the suggestion of last year, that at least 
5 cents per member be contributed monthly for the associational work, 
and if at all possible, this money be paid monthly or in advance. 



Liberty Baptist Association 



21 



4. That we request the Moderator to take an offering at this meeting to 
purchase an adding machine to be used by the clerk and the associa- 
tional missionary. 

Sallie McCracken, Chm. 
26C. Standing Resolution Committee Report. 

Your committee to re-study the Resolution on the Ordination of New 
Ministers and the Organization of New Churches unanimously recommends 
the following changes and additions in the Resolutions as they appear on 
Pages 3 and 4 of the 1948 Minutes of the Liberty Baptist Association: 

1. That the following words be inserted at the very beginning of the 
Resolution on the Ordination of New Ministers: "It is strongly recom- 
mended as the position of this Association." 

2. That the word "to" appearing between the words "prior" and 
"announcement" in Section 2 of the Resolution be deleted. 

3. That the words "in writing"be inserted between the words "requested" 
and "his" in Section 3 of the Resolution on the Ordination of New Min- 
isters; and that the words "before the call of the ordaining council shall 
be approved" be added to said section. 

4. That the initial paragraph in the Resolution on the Organization and 
Admission of New Churches be amended to read as follows: "Recognizing 
the right of the Association to determine its own membership and being 
aware of the importance of the manner in which new churchs are organ- 
ized, we recommend that any group of individuals desiring to organize 
themselves into a new church, with the purpose of seeking the recogni- 
tion of and fellowship and cooperation with this Association be requested 
to meet the following standards:" 

5. That the word "it" appearing between the words "as" and "regards" 
in Section 4 be deleted. 

Sincerely yours, 
, J. Roy Clifford, Chm. 
The Committee) C. F. Leek 
/ E. C. Roach 
1 J. O. Walton 

27. Song, "How Firm a Foundation." 

28. Associatfonal Missionary Report was made by Rev. Vann Carroll. 
This report was adopted. 

Association! Sessionary Report 

This report shows much of what your Associational Missionary has been 
doing but not all. His memory is bad, and he forgets to put down some 
things. However, here is the report : Taught 40 Sunday School Classes, 
Preached 38 Lmes. Presided at three worship services. Visited in 52 ad- 
ditional services of various kinds. Conducted 4 prayer meetings. Delivered 
7 addresses. Helped ordain deacons in 3 churches. Helped ordain one 
preacher. Taught 5 study courses in the S. S. Training Union, and W. M. 
U. Participated in the W. M. U. Mission Study Institute and the R. A. and 
G. A. Associational Camp. Helped take a census of one community. Drew 
two maps of two communities with a view of starting mission work. Helped 
organize one W. M. S. Helped dedicate one pastorium. Conducted a devo- 
tion for the Davidson County Home Dem. Club. Helped promote the 
1948-1949 S. S. program and put it on in several churches and assisted 



22 



Minutes of the 



in several others. Helped promote the Associationalwide S. S. Enlarge- 1 
ment Campaign last March and presented it in 7 churches and conducted I 
it in one church. Promoted a one day Associational V. B. S. Clinic, pre- j 
sented the V. B. S. in several churches, held some faculty meetings, and 
was principal in 5 schools, and helped another get started. Had 130 or 
more individual conferences. 

Meetings attended in the Liberty Association : Six Pastors' Confer- 
ences ; 4 Associational Missions Committee Meetings ; Three Associa- 
tional Deacons' Meetings; one Associational Deacons' Program Planning; 
Meeting ; four Associational Sunday School Meetings ; one meeting of 
Associational S. S. Officers ; a supper meeting of Associational S. S. 
Officers, Pastors, and S. S. Superintendents; six Associational Train- 
ing Union Meetings of various kinds ; Annual Associational W. M. U. 
Meetings; Associational Young People's Rally; and the annual meeting 
of the Association. 

Meetings attended outside the Association: State Associational Sun-; 
day School Officers Planning Meeting, High Point; State Sunday School! 
Clinic, Shelby; State Vacation Bible School Clinic, Fruitland; State 
Training Union Officers Clinic, High Point ; Training Union Regional 
Planning Meeting, Greensboro ; State Training Union Clinic, Charlotte ; 
Regional Training Union Meeting, Winston-Saiem, Greensboro Division-' 
a! W. M. U. Meeting, Salsibury; R. A. Divisional Conclave, Salisbury I 
one of the Rowan Association ; State Associational Missionary Confer-' 
ence, Charlotte ; State Convention. Charlotte ; State Associational Mis- 
sionary Assembly, Fruitland ; State Evangelistic Conference, Winston-' 
Salem ; three days of the Southwide Leadership Conference, Ridgecrest. 

Printed 250 copies of digest of church letters, 180 calendars of activi- 
ties of the year, distributed 1,260 bulletins, and mailed over 1,200 letters 
and. cards, and traveled 10,380 miles. 

In addition to the above, the missionary couldn't stand more than 
about a week's vacation. On it he went back to Virginia visiting and saw 
"The Common Glory" at Williamsburg. 

Now, time and the weariness of the flesh forbid a more lengthy report. 
Respectfully submitted, 
W. V. Carroll, Associational Missionary 

29. Ministers' Retirement Report was prepared and presented by 
Rev. J. W. Dickens, Pastor of Center Hill and Smith Grove Churches. 

Report on PVEinilster's Retirement Plan 

The Relief and Annuity Board was established largely because of 
a sense of guilt which troubled Southern Baptist, due to the fact that so 
little assistance was being given to our retired preachers and widows 
of preachers. 

Every community had seen old preachers destitute, often objects of 
charity. Frequently widows, some with small children, were left without 
any source of income. Southern Baptist were embarrassed, and rightly 
so, that such condition were allowed to exist. The founding of the Relief 
and Annuity Board, with the relief department, in 1918 was a deter- 
mined effort to solve this problem. 

The report reviewing the work of the Relief and Annuity Board 
presented to the Board in its annual meeting at Dallas, Texas on March 
9th clearly showed 1948 to be a year of splendid achievement in service- 
rendered and in increased assets. 

The total income for 1948 was $3,888,740.40, with total benefits paid 
amounting to $1,292,341.84. Total assets of the Board as of December 
31, 1948, were $15,094,093.60. 

There were 2,297 new certificates issued in all plans of the Board, 774 
of them being in the Minister's Retirement Plan. 



Liberty Baptist Association 



23 



The Widows Supplement Annuity Plan is now in force in all the states 
if the Southern Baptist Convention with the exception of two — Florida 
md Tennessee; and Florida has probably qualified for participation before 
this time. 

The relief department paid out $237,252.09 to 1,385 beneficiaries. In 
nine states more money was spent for relief than was received for relief 
in those states. 

In order to participate in the Minister's Retirement Plan the pastor 
pays four per cent of his salary and the church pays four per cent. This 
with- the amount paid in by the convention builds up the retirement fun'd 
for the pastor. 

To participate in the Widows Supplement Annuity Plan one and 
one half per cent of the pastor's salary must be paid. 

If you are not taking advantage of these Retirement Plans why not 
investigate and become a member? 

Respectfully "submitted, 
J. W. Dickens 

30. Visitors recognized: Rev. H. M. St roup, Pastor Franklin Heights 
Baptist Church of Kannapolis, and Dr. L. L. Carpenter, Editor of the 
Biblical Recorder. 

31. Baptist Hospital Report was made by Dr. Fur man Covington of 
rhomasville. Report was adopted, then discussed by Dr. W. K. McGee 
■>f the Hospital. 

Report on N. C. Baptist Hospital 

It is with pride that I report to you that the seed planted by North 
Carolina Baptists 26 years ago with the establishment of the Baptist Hos- 
pital fell into good ground; for today we can boast of a hospital and medi- 
al school that holds a recognized position of high attainment in national 
and international affairs ; and is the only Baptist owned hospital and medi- 
bal school combined in the world. Our Master spent his three years of 
ministry teaching, healing, and aiding the poor, and North Carolina 
Baptists have no institution which so perfectly sets our Master's work as 
!ts example. 

The original one hundred bed hospital, which received its first patient 
|jn May, 1923, has been enlarged to two hundred sixty beds and fifty-five 
jDassinets. In recent years a nurses home, outpatient building, and new 
west wing and laundry building have been added. The hospital cares for 
approximately 9,000 sick in-patients each year, and 36,000 patients through 
Its out-patient department. 

The medical school was built adjoining the hospital in 1941. The 
|3owman Gray School of Medicine supported by the Bowman Gray Found- 
ation, and the general budget of Wake Forest College has brought to this 
Baptist institution a noble position. Its splendid faculty and staff is ever 
busy ministering to the sick. 

> Th's, your institution, has a fully approved school of nursing in 
Ivhich sixty-six ^ young ladies began training for the nursing profession 
|his fall. This is the largest class of probationers in the history of the 
institution. Nurses trained at your hospital are giving comfort and ef- 
ficient help to many sick throughout the world. 

I Not only does your hospital and medical school provide scientific 
lare to the sick, it also provides a Department of Religion to fulfill the 
Ipiritual needs of the sick and those who attend them. 
|. Our financial effort in the Mother's Day offering each year goes to 
lay the expenses of those people who can pay only a part of their hos- 
litalization or nothing at all. The offering in 1948 was $141,150.51 and in- 
lludes the value of linens contributed by the Woman's Missionary Union. 
Ifhe goal for 1949 was $150,000.00 but was not attained. It is estimated 



24 



Minutes of the 



that approximately half the patients admitted to the hospital and all seenl 
in the out-patient department paid no doctors fee, and were assisted byt 
the Mother's Day offering. I feel certain that most of us have had experi-| 
ences ourselves, or with loved ones or friends which give us reason to bel 
grateful, and to continue to support this institution made possible by thef 
vision of North Carolina Baptists. It is with deep faith and belief in thel 
love and generosity of the Baptist people that our leaders go forward! 
with plans for a greater Medical Center at Graylyn in conjunction withl 
the removal of Wake Forest College to Winston- Salem. In spite oil 
the wonderful work that is now being done at our Baptist Hospital; 
and Medical School its facilities are inadequate to cope with the medical 
care being demanded. Your institution has become a research and diag-i, 
nostic center of wide reknown. Its services are always available andl 
always helpfully given to the physicians in your home town. 

Our institution in Winston- Salem is a vital force in promoting thel 
health and happiness of the people of North Carolina and surrounding! 
states, and the possibilities for expansion of its services is unlimited. 

The American scene is fraught with the dangers of "isms," and as 
we talk of our Baptist Hospital it should be a stimulus to steady our think- 
ing, for here we have an institution modelled after the work of our Lord 
and founded by the free enterprise of Christian men. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Furman P. Covington 

Report on Christian Literature 

32. This was a verbal report made by Bro. L. A. Martin, a laymat\ 
from Lexington 1st Church. Report was adopted. Dr. L. L. Carpen 
ter also discussed Christian Literature.. No written report on this 

33. The W.M. U. Report was prepared and presented by Mrs. Beamei 
Barnes of Lexington 1st Church. This report was adopted. 

W. M. U. Report 

There is a Woman's Missionary Organization in 27 of the 35 churches 
in Liberty Association. Ten of this number are fully graded Women's 
Missionary Unions. The remaining 17 consist of a W. M. S. and one oi 
more Young People's organizations. Records and reports for the yeai 
1948 show some achievements worthy of special recognition. One achieve- 
ment was the organization of one new society during the year. 

The membership for the year reached 954, this is a gain of 64 ovei 
the Commemoration year goal set for the Association. 

One society, 3 Y. W. A. Organization, 3 G. A. Groups, and 3 Sun- 
beam Bands reached the A-l Standard for the year. 

Three Missionary Unions reported 100% of their membership reading 
a missionary book during the year. 

Perhaps the greatest achievement was in giving. The women of this 
Association exceeded their total gifts of 1947 by $2,635.15. Total gifts foi 
the women and young people during 1948 was $18,003.95. 

A Leadership Conference, A Young People's Rally, A Mission Stud] 
Institute, and A Community Missions Institute were held on an Associa 
tional basis and were well attended by members from all 27 organizations 

The women of the Association took as a special project the setting 
up of a Scholarship Fund to be used by any student in the Association 
needing assistance in attending one of the Training Schools. This was 
a successful project and a young lady from our Association took advantag< 
of the fund to attend W. M. U. Training School at Louisville. Two of lh< 
Unions have set up Scholarship Funds in their individual societies foi 
use by young people in their churches. 

The intangible achievements of the women of Liberty Associatioi 
have been many as they have "labored together with God to make knowt 



Liberty Baptist Association 



28 



the sons of men His mighty acts and the glory of the majesty of His 
lgdom.'* These achievements can never be measured in figures, nor 
tyred for printing on paper, but we rejoice in them and thank our 
rd for His use of His servants. 

As Southern Baptist open new fields of Missionary endeavor the 
mien's Missionary Union of Liberty Association join in the work with 
d and grateful hearts for the privilege that : 

"We've a Saviour to show to the nations, 
Who the path of sorrow has trod, 
That all of the world's great people 
Might come to the truth of God, 
Might come to the truth of God. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Mrs. Beamer Barnes 

. MISCELLANEOUS— At this time the Finance Committee recom- 
nded that a collection be taken for the purpose of purchasing an 
ling machine for the use of the Clerk and Associational Mission- 
. The amount received was $41.26. 

. The Home Mission Report was prepared and presented by Rev. 
?oy Clifford, Pastor of Lexington 1st Church. Report was adopted. 

Report on Home Missions 

During last year 741 missionaries were in the service of our Home 
ird, an increase of 21 over the preceeding year. In addition, there were 

summer workers. This great Home Missions force reported 28,218 con- 
sions ; 8,438 additions to churches; 10,049 missions classes taught; 803 
ivals conducted; 53 new missions opened; 23 new churches organized; 

4 new mission centers established. 

The Home Missions Board's work is organized around the following 
departments: Direct Missions, Co-operative Missions, Evangelism, Jew- 
Work, Education and Publicity. Negro Work, General Field Work, 
iplains, Church Building and Loan Fund, and Migrant Work, 
j he Home Board is now at work in 23 states, the District of Columbia, 
ska, Cuba, the Canal Zone, and Panama. In the convention territory 
■ it is estimated there are 40,000,000, people ten years of age and 
er, who are not professing Christians. 

| In the presence of an expanding responsibility — almost each year, new 
jes are being added to the Convention fie'd of work — the Home Board 
t to contend with almost static income. The Convention set 16.5% of 
Co-operative Program as the share of the Home Work. This per- 
|age prov'des less than half the total resources of the Board. The 
tr half ccmes largely from the W. M. U. Annie Armstrong Offering 
fch last year amounted to a half million dollars. Let the churches en- 
gage and support the W. M. U. and Sunday School in their special 
I for Home Missions. 

' The Headquarters Building of the Home Board, in Atlanta, is being 
Sjrged from the original three to eight stories. It is expected that te- 
le from the rental of added space will cover all central administrative 
pnse, thus making it possible to put 100 cents of every dollar given 
1 the field of Home Missions. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. Roy Clifford 

^Adjourned for the noon hour at 12:15; Benediction by Rev. J. W. 
cens. 

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON 

Opening song, "What A Friend We Have In Jesus. It was led by 
Carey Davis. 



26 



Minutes of the 



37. Devotion was led by Rev. D. W. Oldham, Pastor of Greenwci 
Church. Scripture used, 2nd Timothy, subject was "Working a| 
Walking with Christ." 

38. The Report on Public Morals was prepared and presented 
Rev. A. L. McGee of Carolina Avenue Church. The report was adopd 
This report was discussed by Dr. Harris of Thomasville. 

Report on Public Morals 

You and I have been permitted to live in the greatest nation in I 
world. Yet, the very things that have made our nation great, and : 
which many of our fore-fathers bled and died, are being threatened 
the evils that come under this subject of Public Morals. 

Dr. Allredge, statistical secretary of the Southern Baptist Conventi 
in Southern Baptist Handbook of recent date, states: "Fifty years z 
the United States was the most law-abiding nation in the_ world. Nowj 
is the most lawless. In the past ten years, population has increased sev 
teen per cent in the United States, and crime has increased one hundi' 
and seventeen per cent." 

What has come over our nation during the past fifty years? Notlr 
more than what you have read time and again on the front page of y<! 
daily newspaper, or heard over your radio as you sat in your comfortas 
chair by your fireside. The average person may not know about all ' 
crimes that are being committed today, but there is sufficient informal^ 
coming into our hemes by means of the newspaper and the radio \ 
show that lawlessness is on the forward march through-out our land tod', 

As an illustration, will you take one more quick look with me at I 
newspaper of the past year? In your mind, re-read some of those artic 
that said something like this : 

1. "Over 10 billion dollars spent during the past year for liquor." 
This is no doubt one of the leading crimes today. 

2. "One out of every three marriages end in the divorce courts." 
This means that many of our homes are going on the rocks. 

3. "Sex crimes are on the increase." 

There are few crimes which are so shocking as this one. Your cc 
munity and mine is not immuned to this terrible thing by any means. H 
Point, N.C. experienced two such crimes within one week. Thomasvi 
N. C. experienced one such crime only one week before ; and if the Tr 
were known, some poor innocent child in Lexington has been moles 
by the same act within the past few weeks. 

4. "Sunday Attractions." Boating, Fishing, Auto Racing, Sun<! 
Movies, Sunday Baseball, etc. 

. 5. "Vandalism Sweeps City." 

What does this mean? It means that a group of young people, with 
any place to go or anything to do, has turned to breaking out windo 
setting fire to buildings, and breaking out street lights. 

Time will not permit us to refer to all the crimes that are sweep! 
over our land, but we have looked at enough to get some idea of w 
is going on in this country that we love. 

"What next?" is the heart cry of every true child of God. Unless 
church, which is "the light of the world and the salt of the earth," ta 
the initiative and leads out in a real program of reaching the people; 
our nation with the truth as Jesus lived it and taught it, we will 
reading headlines in our papers of tommorrow like this: 

"Sex crime is now leading all other crimes." 

"Twenty billion dollars spent last year for liquor." 

"Divorce is now a respectable procedure for the younger set." 

"Sunday no longer a Holy Day, it is now a commercialized holidcj 

"Vandalism is a normal thing for active youth." 

I have mentioned only five of the most outstanding crimes of 



Liberty Baptist Association 



27 



day. These will suffice to show what is happening to our nation, our 
cities, and our communities. 

Will we continue to sit in our easy chairs, as we have done in the 
past, and leave the correcting of these problems to the police departments 
and the courts of our land? God grant that this will not be the case. 
May the Lord help us to see our overall responsibility to our fellowman 
who as yet has not seen the light of God's sure word, or known the 
love of Christ, or experienced the joy of sins forgiven. May the Spirit 
of God lead us out to evangelize our communities, our cities, and our en- 
tire nation for Christ while there is time and opportunity. 

Respectfully submitted, 
A. L. McGee 

39. American Bible Society Report was prepared and presented by 
Miss Grace M. Battle of Mills Home. Report was adopted. 

Report on American Bible Society 

According to the latest reports, in 1948, the American Bible Society 
distributed through its various agencies, at home and abroad 846,319 Bibles ; 
1,388,441 Testaments and 7,481,491 portions of Scriptures, making a grand 
total of 9,716,251 volumes. 

Last year, the Bible Society distributed 5 ; 368,336 Bibles, portions of 
Scriptures and New Testaments to countries outside the United States, 
despite the high cost of transportation and other economic barriers, which 
is a high tribute to the persistence and resourcefulness of the Society's 
agents. 

Distribution of the Scriptures and Talking Book records, to the Blind, 
was the largest in the Society's history. There were more calls for the 
Braille Bible than ever before, not only from the blind in the United 
States but from many in several foreign countries, still greatly impover- 
ished by the war. In 1948 the Society made available a motion picture on 
the work for the blind, entitled "Thy Word Giveth Light." 

The Bible in America is the living hope of all kinds of people, all 
churches, all races. It speaks in a man's own language and takes down 
the barriers of race to make a highway of understanding. The Society's 
William I. Haven Memorial Agency, for work among the colored people of 
[he United States, is busy making sure that the Scriptures continues to 
bring hope and vision and salvation to its people. 
j< "And He hath made of one blood, all nations of men." 
| During the current year of 1949, over $300,000 has been spent from 
j;he Society's Emergency Fund for Germany alone, in order to enable her 
to overcome the Scripture shortage, due to the ravages of war. About 
!>50,000 volumes have been shipped to her along with paper and binding 
Materials, for the publication of Scriptures. A speed press and folding 
machine were ordered to further facilitate the operation of the newly 
formed union of German Bible Societies. For the past two years the 
[Society has spent $236,624.39 to give the Bible to Japan and Korea and a 
itill larger expansion program is contemplated for next year. Calls are 
poming daily, from all the war torn countries and the hungry millions, for 
nore Bibles. We are told that there has never been such a pressing de- 
hand for the Word of God. Under the cruel hand of poverty, suffering 
pd starvation, these people realize the truthfulness of the saying of 
fesus, that "man does not live bv bread alone, but by every word that 
>roceedeth from the mouth of God." 

Therefore, the supreme opportunity has arrived for us to give the 
<Vord to these people. They are starving for the Bread of Life. It is more 
l-ssential for the soul than bread is for the body, more powerful than guns, 
lore precious than gold and more lasting than the stars. "It is the power 



28 



of God unto salvation to everyone who believes." It brings light and life 
and liberty and ultimate peace. . 

Let the Bible-loving people and Christians in every church continue 
their support of the American Bible Society, that God's Word may^ go 
forth in all its saving power to the Bible-hungry millions, throughout 
the world. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Grace M. Battle 

40. Report on Time, Place and Preacher 

TIME-Tuesday and Wednesday after 4th Sunday in Sept. (26-27) 1950. 

PLACE— Stoners Grove, 26th; Holloways, 27th. 

PREACHER- Dr. Zeno Wall. ALTERNATE-Rev. C. M. Pegram. 

41. Resolution Committee Report was presented by Rev. A. L. McGee. 
This report was adoped. 

Report of Committee on Resolutions 

We, of the Liberty Baptist Association, wish to extend to the Sheets 
Memorial Baptist Church its deep gratitude for the hospitality displayed 
during this the 117th annual session of the Association. May we also thank 
its able pastor and nobie women for the delicious meals. 

We also express our appreciation to the Vice- Moderator and Clerk of 
the Association for the efficient manner in which they have planned and; 
carried on the work of the Assaciation. 

We likewise express our appreciation for the flowers and the beautiful, 

music rendered. , . , 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. L. McGee, Chm. 

42. The motion to dedicate the Minutes this year in memory 1 
Rev. Chas. Young, deceased, former pastor of Sheets Memorial Church, 
was adopted. 

43. Report on Obituaries was presented by Rev. Chas. Young Jr. 
Pastor of SummerReld Church. This report was adopted. 

44. Report on Foreign Missions was prepared by Rev. E. C. Roach. 
It was adopted without reading. 

Report on Foreign Missions 
Southern Baptists have mission work in thirty geographical areas In 
seven of these areas work is at present carried on by nationals without!, 
missionary personnel ; three of these are m Communist Europe, three * 
Communist China and the other in Moslem Trans-Jordan. The Foreiga 
Mission Board has 689 active missionaries under appointment, working; 

in 119 mission centers. . , • inio t «. - M 

Seventy-three missionaries were appointed m 1948; torty-six ad- 
ditional appointments were made between January 1, and May SI, 194* 
Missionaries are stationed in four new areas: Guatemala, Venezuela,: 
Formosa, and West China. Also Costa Rica with two missionaries was: 
transferred from the Home Mission Board to the Foreign Mission 
Board on May 1, 1949. . . , ' 

Among the foreign mission highlights are: a missionary doctors suc- 
cess in securing a license to practice medicine in Paraguay, making pos- 
sible establishment of Southern Baptists' first hospital in South America; 
a missionary couple sent to Paraguay for Russian-speaking people; pur- 



Liberty Baptist Association 



29 



chase of Southern Baptists' first missionary airplane, for use in interior 
Brazil; rehabilitation of China and Japan from the destruction of the 
war; an international theological seminary opening in Switzerland this 
fall; extensive building in Italy; intensive envangelistic work in Nigeria 
and the Gold Coast. 

The healthy condition of Baptist work abroad is evident in the nation- 
al Baptist conventions organized within the year and in the extensive work 
of older national organizations. The Colombian- Venezuelan Convention 
was organized in February this year; the China Baptist Convention, for 
the first time bringing Baptists from the whole of China into one organi- 
zation, was formed in November, 1948; and the Uruguayan Convention 
was formed in June, 1948. The value of such national organizations is 
demonstrated in countries where national Baptist are holding Southern 
Baptist work together without missionary aid. 

In response to an undercurrent of insistence, Secretary M. Theron 
Rankin, early in 1948, proposed an advance program calling for an annual 
budget of $10,000,00 and a total staff of 1,750 missionaries. This grew into 
the Southern Baptist Advance Program presented to the Convention in 
Oklahoma City in May, launching a campaign for advancement all along, 
the line, from the local church to the world mission fields, based on the 
principle of a fifty-fifty division of the collection plate dollar. 

Foreign Mission advance depends upon devotion to Christ and His 
kingdom program. The Holy Spirit will provide the necessary resources 
in men and money, if Southern Baptist are determined to do the will 
of God. 

Respectfully submitted, 
E. C. Roach 

45. Closing message to the Liberty Association by Dr. A. S. Hale, 
if First Baptist Church in High Point — he was presented by Rev. 
E. C. Roach. The subject, "Optimism for Christ" was well prepared 
and delivered. Benediction was by Dr. Hale. 

Adjourned to meet with Stoners Grove and Hollow ays Churches 
>n September 26-27, 1950, 

Rev. J. O. Walton, Moderator 
A. L. Snider, Clerk 



30 



Minutes of the 



(But Bern? (&mvb 

Who have answered the Roll Call since last meeting 

In my Father's House are many mansions, 
i go to prepare a place, for ypu john 14:2 

Abbotts Creek— Mr. Sanford Smith, Mrs. Maud Wood, Mr. Tur- 
ner Teague, Mrs. Dora Joyce, Mr. W. F. Motsinger. 
Center Hill- Mrs. J. F. Smith. 

Churchland— Mrs. V. C. Simerson, Mrs. B. R. Barrier, Mrs. S. 
E. Simerson. 

Denton— Mr. D. C. Doyle, Mr. A. S. Miller, Deacon L. A. Ty- 

singer, Mr. Joe Tysinger. 
Floyd— None. 

Holloways— Mr. E. L. Strickland. 
High Rock — Miss Carolyn Jane Morgan. 
Jersey — Mrs. Ada Roach. 
Lake View — Mrs. Margaret Green. 

Lexington 1st— Mrs. Homer Ship wash, Mrs. W. J. Lancaster. 
Erlanger — Miss Nancy Freeman, Mrs. Nannie Mauney. 
Sheets Memorial— Mr. Charles Yarbrough, Mr. J. C. Stegall. 
Liberty— Mrs. Ida Gordon, Mrs. Lula Underwood. 
Lick Creek — None. 
Mountain Virw — None. 

New Friendship — Mrs. Harper Ray, Mrs. Nancy B. Stewart, 

Mr. T. N. Hartley. 
Oak Hill — None. 
Pleasant Plains — None. 
Reeds— None. 

Rich Fork— Mr. Dallas Everhart, Mr. Tom Clinard, Mr. John 

Eddinger. 
Smith Grove— Mrs. C. C. Orrell. • 
Stoners Grove — Mrs. Ann Warfford. 

Summerville— Mrs. Sallie Floyd, Mr. Adam J. Baily. Mrs. Clem- 
entine Bean. 
Taylors Grove — None. 

Thomasville 1st -Mrs. M. Saunders, Mr. A. J. Hudson, Mr 
David T. Cowan, Mrs. Birdie Ruckett, Mr. Thomas D. Wells 
Mr. F. Chisholm. 

Carolina Avenue — None. 

Glennanna — Mr. Jim Welborn. 

Greenwood — None. 

Mills Home— Rev. J. A. McMillian, Mrs. Lottie Britton. 
Reid Street— -Mr. C. E. Perry. 
South Side— Mr. Branson Hill. 
Union Grove — Mr. J. A. Loyell. 

Wallburg— Mrs. Charlie R. Dodson, Mr. Charlie Smith. 

Walters Grove— None. 

We /come -Mr. A. E. Becker. 



Liberty Baptist Association 



Minutes of Woman's Missionary Union 

Liberty Baptist Association 

The Woman's Missionary Union of Liberty Association met for its 
L3rd Annual Session with Sheets Memorial Baptist Church, Lexington, 
Lpril 21, 1949, with Mrs. P. M. Hendrix, Superintendent, presiding. The 
Cheme for the meeting was, "That the World May Know." 

The morning worship opened with the group singing the Hymn of the 
fear, "O For a Thousand Tongues to Sing." The Watchwords were then 
;iven (quoted in unison): 
1 Cor. 3:9a, "For we are laborers together with God." 
Psalms 145:12, "To make known to the sons of men his mighty acts, 

and the glorious majesty of his kingdom." 
Col 3:24b, "For ye serve the Lord Christ." 
Morning devotions were conducted by Mrs. J. Roy Clifford of Lexing- 
on 1st Church. Special worship music was rendered by representatives 

t Mills Home. Greetings were given by Mrs. D. W. Digh and the re- 
onse by Mrs. Beamer Barnes. 

During the', business session the following visitors were recognized: 
iiss Irene Chambers, Field Representative of our Home Mission Board; 
Irs John Wacaster, State Worker; Mrs. E. L. Bodenheimer, Divisional 
tewardship Chairman. Appointment of committees were made at this 
ime after which representatives of Societies were recognized. 

Annual Report of Superintendent 
1948, our Commemoration Year, in which we pledged "to serve the 
iord Christ" to our utmost, is past history; but we hope full of achieve- 
lent that will count much through the years. 

True, Liberty Association failed to reach some of its goals, however 
lany of our women and young people are entering 1949 with a keener 
mse of responsibility, and renewed energy and determination "to serve 
le Lord Christ." 

COMMEMORATION 

Goals Attainments 

Annie Armstrong ..$1,255.82 $1,052.32 

Lottie Moon $2,158.66 $2,300.91 

Co-operative $9,445.84 $9,085.62 

Membership 890 954 

Additional churches with W.M.U. work goal 3, acquired 0. 
The above represents combined Young People and W.M.U. goals and 
enlevements. Our Young People's Director will present special attain- 
ents of young people's organizations. 

SPECIAL EVENTS 
January Leadership Conference 
March Executive Committae Meeting 
April General W.M.U. Associational Meeting 

October Young People's Rally 

Executive Committee Meeting and Luncheon 
Mission Study— Community Missions Institute 



32 Minutes of the 



HONOR ROLL A-l Societies 
W. M. 3. Y. W. A. G. A. SUNBEAM 

Lexington 1st Carolina Ave. Erlanger Mills Home 

Denton Lexington 1st, Jr. 

Erlanger Mills Home - Mrs. Walton 

B and C Societies are no longer recognized. 

SPECIAL MENTION 
100 per cent Reading Missionary Book 

W.M.S Y.W.A. G.A. R.A. SUNBEAM 

Union Grove Glennanna Mills Home Mills Home Reeds 
Liberty Mills Home Mrs. Paul Keyes Blair Little 

Glennanna Lee Hedgepeth Velva Daughtny 

Mrs. J.O. Walton Frances Bandy 
Counselors Counselors 

FULLY GRADED UNIONS 

Churchland Reed Street Erlanger New Friendship 
Mills Home Lexington 1st Greenwood Thomasville 1st 

COMPLETE FINANCIAL REPORT 

1st Qtr. 2nd Qtr. 3rd Qtr. 4th Qtr 
Co-operative W.M.S. ___$1,860.55—$1,822.13— $1,720.97— $1,834.6^ 

Co-operative Y. P 460.14, 372.23_ 448.05. 566.9c 

Special W.M.S 1,018,81-— 1, 1 82.79— - 800.57- 3,119.7( 

$3,552.68— $5,371.54— _$3,096.06— $5,983.6' 
Gifts 1947 Women and Young People— $15,368.80 
Gifts 1948 Women and Young People. $18,003.95 

STANDARD OF EXCELLENCE 

We did not reach all points on Standard, failing to reach 1, 7, 9, 10. 

GLIMPSES AT 1949 

1st quarter. .Co-operative Gifts__$2,431.81 - „ — <n Q QQQ 1Q 

1st quarter_.Special Gifts ll,057M Goal for year $ 9 ' 993 - 19 

FINANCIAL GOALS 1949 

1. 10 per cent increase in Undesignated Co-operative Gifts 

2. 10 per cent increase in Annie Armstrong Offering 

3. 10 per cent increase in Heck Memorial Offering 

4. 10. per cent increase in State Mission Offering 

WORLD RELIEF 
Our women and young people respond generously to this phase of givj 
ing. please keep in mind that this is NOT community missions, but is as 
important avenue of service. Community missions means projects of ser 
vice directed within the association. The ultimate aim— soul winning- 
should ever be kept uppermost. 

PLANNING CONFERENCE 

Our conference was well attended — 23 societies represented — with a 
estimated attendance of 125. 

Charts of Standard of Excellence attainments of each society, wfeij 
presented presidents. These were discussed at length in conference 



Liberty Baptist Association 



33 



Results of this discussion are already apparent in well filled out reports 
this past quarter. 

The 1949 Supplement to the Guide Book was discussed and each 
woman pledged to do her part in helping maintain ideals and aims of W.M.U. 

Community Missions, Stewardship and Mission Study reports show 
excellent work the first quarter of this year. 

For the cooperation and support of each associational and local officer 
md others I am grateful. Your continued support and prayers are covet- 
ed as we go forward to better "serve the Lord Christ." 

Respecefully submitted, 

Mrs. P. M. HENDRICKS, Supt. 

IN OUR HOME AND COMMUNITY— Mrs. R. L. Palmer 

Swiftly time moves and we find ourselves at the close of the first quar- 
ter of 1949. I am sure that your annual report revealed to you as it did 
to me, our failures as well as our successes. While we are encouraged with 
substantial gains in every phase of work in community missions activities, 
sve are grieved that many of our women and young people are not partici- 
pating in this work. Let us continue to put forth more effort to enlist 
jvery member of W.M.U. in an all year program to meet physical, moral, 
md spiritual needs of every community. 

Our program for this year isn't new. The cure for sin remains the 
same— that of love. Do we love those for whom Christ died? We shall 
ind it quite impossible to win souls except on the basis of love, sympa- 
shetic understanding, and complete guidance through prayer. It is not the 
purpose of your Chairman to suggest a lot of new things to do, but rather 
•eemphasize the things we have been trying to do: 

Every member of the W.M.U. united in prayer for a world-wide 
•evival beginning in our own church. Family worship in every home. 
Fear-round program on soul-winning activities. Seek to enlist every mem- 
per in each Society in community mission work. 

I know you are disappointed that we were denied a state-wide refer- 
endum on the liquor question, but this should challenge to more earnest 
prayer and conrageous effort to abolish the evil which is causing so much 
sorrow and is destroying so many lives. With the spirit of courage to fight 
Against the evil forces may we win triumphantly through Him 

tFor our associational achievement this year we plan to help a student 
school. Victories of our commemoration year were gratifying. W.M.U. 
j|ias honored His Name through these sixty years through the channel of 
ftudy, prayer, giving self, time, talents, money and children. May we go 
orward to lengthen our cords and ,trengthen our stakes. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Mrs. R. L. PALMER 

\ .IN HIS MIGHTY ACTS TODAY - Miss Veola Evans 
v" I'tie Mission Study report was given by Miss Evans substituting for 
tfrs. N. C. Teague, who during the year left the Association to 'work in 
mother area. M ' 

* Mission Study Institute -Held in October 

Mission Study Classes Women 55 

Young People 99 



34 Minutes of the 



Number W.M.S. members completing study of book _._ 658 

« " 4 " an approved missionary book-_d9© 

Total number reading a missionary book: 
Women_-l,029-Y.W.A.--66-G.A.^133-R.A.-_102 SUNBEAM-56 
Respectfully submitted, 
Miss VEOLA EVANS 

Mrs J N.Shockey, Associational Literature Chairman assisted by other 
members of Mills Home dramatized the use Missionary Magazines on thej 
W.M.U. work and home. 
THROUGH EVERY BAPTIST A TITHER-Miss Sallie McCracken 

(This report was prepared by Mrs. C. C. Coppedge, Asso. Stewardship 
Chairman and given by Miss Sallie McCracken.) 

Another year has passed, and as we look over the record we find a gain 
in tithers for W.M.U and for the young people. While the W.M.U. is mother 
to the auxiliaries, it has let the Young People lead in the number ol J new 
Tithers. There were 18 Young People's organizations using the W.M.U.: 
Stewardship Education plan regularly: Four churches observed Cnurcn 
Night of Stewardship." , 

It is the hope and prayer of the State W.M.U. that every dollar we give: 
will be 50-50 by 1950, giving for other needs as much as is kept at home.. 

May we pray that God will open our eyes and hearts so that we may 
realize "we are not our own, we are bought with a price and that It is 
required of a steward that he (she) be found faithful;" because Every ont 
of us shall give an account of himself to God," therefore, we must 
"Render to God the things that are God's." 

The goal in Tithers for 1949 is 50,000. Let us, as real stewards, help oui 
State W.M.U reach this goal and go over, remembering, "The earth is the 
Lord's and the fullness thereof, the world and they that dwell therein/' 

May God bless each of you, and may you give your best to our Lord. 
Respectfully submitted, 
Miss SALLIE McCRACKEN 

THE URGENCY OF MAKING HIM KNOWN was presented bj 
Mrs. John Wacaster. Among facts given were these: Hunger BREEDS wai; 
and crime, and as yet 2/3 of the world has not accepted Christ as Saviour 

At this time the group sang, "O Zion Haste." Announcements were made > 
then two YWA girls from Center Hill sang "They are Nailed to the Cross. 

The last speaker of the morning session was Miss Irene Chambers tell- 
ing of the work and workers of the Home Mission Board. Closing prayer was 
led by Rev. D. W. Digh. Lunch was served by ladies of the hostess Church 

The afternoon session began at 1:30 with singing of the hymn Al 
Hail the Power of Jesus' Name." The devotionals were led by Rev. Jcj. J? 
Baker, pastor New Friendship Church. He used Ps. 145 as subject basisj 
THAT THE WORLD MAY KNOW— Through Our Young People 

Miss Helen Tate, Associational Young People's Leader, presented th< 
work our Young People enlisted in missionary organizations. A differed 
speaker represented each organization. Mrs. George Nading discussed m 
work of the Sunbeams. Mrs. Thomas of Sheeta Memorial led three of hei 
girls in an informal talk of what the G.A. work meant personally to theif 
spiritual lives. Rev. W. F. Gentry presented three boys who discussed tn<j 
Standard of Excellence for the R.A. work and the influence of the traminj 
on their lives. Mrs. Hedrick, from Erlanger, presented four of her Y .W.Aj 
girls citations for special achievements in their work. A reward that onlj! 
a few have received in the State. 

TRAINED FOR SERVICE— Mrs. R. G. Jennings 

Surely the verse, "Guard that which is committed to thy trust," maj 
be our watchword in the joyful task of financing the education of the son| 
and daughters of our missionaiies through the Margaret Fund. Y/hile tnei 
parents represent us on foreign fields, we may in a financial way represen 



Liberty Baptist Association 



35 



hem here in guiding these young people. During the past 30 years, the 
W.M.U. has helped 565 students. By contributing to the regular offerings 
'or home and foreign missions, we help to provide for the scholarship fund. 
Phe Burney gifts going out three times a year $15 each and provide 
[spending" money for books and extra curricular activities. North Caro- 
ina has 13 students for this year. 

We are very proud of our girls at W.M.U. Training School. We know 
hat in this school our girls are "trained for service." We have 17 girls there 
his year. We have been especially interested in our own Elizabeth Hay- 
vorth. We have helped provide for her expenses and it has blessed us. 

I would like to propose that we continue this fund, calling it a scholar- 
hip fund, for girls who attend the Training School from our association. 
Respectfully submitted, 
Mrs. R. G. JENNINGS 

The reports were adopted and the proposal was presented and carried 
o permanently establish a scholarship fund. 

Memorial Meditations— Mrs. P. M. Hendricks, Mrs. Mary Alice Jesse. 

Departed Friends— Mrs. W. J. Lancaster, of Lexington 1st Church 
Mrs. Lettie Brittan, of Mills Home Church. 

When our friends and loved ones leave this life we can feel deeply the 
nought expressed so vividly by Edgar Guest; "There is no time that we 
:ould set for parting. We who must remain are never ready for such 
>ain. < Even our prayer would be: Not yet! Not yet dearLord— another 
lay with us let our beloved stay! We must believe when falls the blow 
hat wisely, God had willed it so." For we know that they have simply 
tepped from the earthly home into the heavenly realm. Can we not 
ejoice that when the sunset of life has faded that the sunrise of 
iternity bursts into glory. Can we not think of this that someone has so 
>eautifully portrayed. Think of: 

Stepping on shore and finding it heaven, 

Of taking hold of a hand and finding it God's hand, 

Of breathing new air and finding it celestial air, 

Of feeling invigorated and finding immortality, 

Of passing from storm and stress to an unknown calm, 

Of awaking and finding it heaven. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEES 

TIME and PLACE: We recommend that the next meeting be held 
n April, 1950, at Greenwood Baptist Church, Thomasville. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Mrs. CARRIE MAE BECK 
Mrs. CARRIE TEAGUE 
Mrs. BRAD SECHIEST 

RESOLUTION: The committee on resolutions of the Woman's Mis- 
ionary Union of the Liberty Association extend to the W.M.U. of the 
sheets Memorial Baptist Church our deep appreciation and grateful thanks 
or their gracious hospitality at the 43rd annual Association meeting. We 
:ongratulate them on the building of this beautiful house of worship. The 
ovely flowers added much to the attractiveness. 

m We express our appreciation to those who are responsible for the in- 
spiring and carefully planned program; and, especially appreciate the splen- 
lid messages brought by Mrs. Wacaster, our State Field Worker, and Miss 
Chambers representing our Home Mission Board. 

We hope that from year to year our W.M.U. will grow as we "serve 
;he Lord Christ." 

Respectfully submitted, 
Mrs. G. C. LEWIS 
Miss VEOLA HESTER 
Mrs. J. B. POWELL 



3 6 



Minutes of the 



The nominating committee for 1950 was announced at this time by 
Mrs. Hendricks: 

Mrs. E. F. Baker, Chm. Mrs. B. V. Broadway 

Mrs. D. W. Digh Mrs. C. A. Smith 

Mrs. W. Parker 

Mrs. E. L. Morgan took the Chair at this time to announce the list of 
officers the committee wished to present for election to serve for 1949. Her 
report was accepted and the following were elected to serve: 

Supt Mrs. P M.Hendricks Stewardship__Mrs.O. W. Rhodenhiser 

Associate Supt.__Mrs. Paul Kestler Literature Mrs. W. F. Gentry 

Sec.-Treas Miss Veola Evans Training School _._Mrs. Vann Carroll! 

Mission Study __Mrs. S. O. Hinkle Y. P. Leader Miss Helen Tate; 

Com'u'ty Mis'n.Mrs. R. L. Palmer R. A. Leader Rev. W. F. Gentry 

Mrs. J. Roy Clifford gave the charge to the officers and led in the 
Dedication Prayer. 

Last speaker of the afternoon was Rev. J. O. Walton of Mills Home. 
Forcefully he spoke of the missionary and personal message found in the 
hymn, "0 For A Thousand Tongues To Sing." At the close of his message 
the hymn was sung again by the group. Closing prayer was led by our 
Associational Missionary, Rev. Vann Carroll; adjournment followed. 
Respectfully submitted, 

VEOLA EVANS, Sec. 

W.M.U. TREASURER'S REPORT 



Receipts for 1948 $136.65 

April Balance 14.81 

Disbursements for 1948 

April Miss Councilman (Missionary) $10.00 

Miss B. Council 4.00 

May Expenses for Supt. 10.00 

Charity and Children 5.00 

Oct. Mission Study Institute 15.00 

Y.P. Rally and Expenses 25.00 

Jan. Expenses for Mrs. E. L. Morgan 2.00 

Expenses for Supt 10.00 

Feb. Miss Ora Alford 5.00 

March Travel Expense for Miss Evans 10.00 

Total $96.00 

Balance $57.46 



Respectfully submitted, 
VEOLA EVANS, Treasurer 



Associational Minute Fund Received. Year Ending Aug. 31, 1949 



Abbotts Creek $ 18.00 

Center Hill 11.20 

Churchland 15.00 

Denton 15.00 

Floyd 2.00 

Hoiloways 10.00 

High Rock 3.60 

Jersey 14.08 

Lake View 2.10 

Lexington 1st 53.85 

Coggins Mission 

Erlanger 

Sheets Memorial 

Liberty 8.75 

Lick Creek , 1.80 

Mountain View 4.00 

New Friendship 15.00 

Oak Hill 5.75 



Pleasant Plains 2.00 

Reeds 24.20 

Rich Fork 12.44 

Smith Grove 6.35 

Stoners Grove 17.00 

Summerville 5.00 

Taylors Grove 1.00 

Thomasville 1st 40.00 

Carolina Ave 12.50 

Greenwood 6 

Glannanna 5.00 

Mills Home 15.00 

Reid Street 9.00 

South Side 10.00 

Union Grove 2.00 

Wallburg 10.00 

Walters Grove 4.35 

Welcome , 7.00 

$369.69 



A. L. Snider, Associational Clerk 





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Liberty Baptist Association 



Historical TabSe of the Association 

YEAR WHERE HELD PREACHER , MODERATOR CLERK 

1832...1 Jamestown George W. Purefoy Wm. Burch Peter Owen 

1833 Holloways Josiah Williams Eli Carroll Peter Owen 

1834 Abbotts Creek Eli Carroll Eli Carroll Peter Owen 

1835 Liberty John Culpepper Eli Carroll Peter Owen 

1836 Jersey Eli Carroll Eli Carroll Peter Owen 

1837 Lick Creek Peter Owen Eli Carroll Peter Owen 

1838 Abbotts Creek Benjamin Lanier Eli Carroll Peter Owen 

1839. ..2 Pine Meeting H. ...Eli Carroll Eli Carroll Peter Owen 

1840 Holloways Josiah Wiseman Eli Carroll Peter Owen 

1841 New Friendship Benjamin Lanier Gershom Tuessey Peter Owen 

1842 Reeds X Roads Barton Roby Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

1843 Lick Creek Benjamin Lanier Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

1844 Abbotts Creek Wm. Turner Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

1845 Jersey Alfred Renney Benjamin Lanier Azariah Wil iams 

1846 Lick Creek Wm, Turner Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

1847 Abbotts Creek Wm. Turner Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

1848 Reeds X Roads Benjiman Lanier Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

1849. ..3 Big Creek Azariah Williams Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

1850...1 Jamestown Benjamin Lanier Renjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

1851 Liberty Wm. Turner Wm, Turner Azariah Williams 

1852 Holloways Z. Minor Wm. Turner Azariah Williams 

1853 Abbotts Creek Benjamin Lanier Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

1854 Reeds X Roads Alfred Kenney Josiah Spurgeon Azariah Williams 

1855 Lick Greek Benjamin Lanier Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

1856 Abbotts Creek (Unknown) Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

1857 Reeds X Roads Wm. Lambeth Amos Weaver Azariah Wiiliams 

jl858 Holloways Amos Weaver Amos Weaver Azariah Williams 

jl859 New Friendship Benjamin Lanier Benjamin Lanier J. H. Owen 

|1860 Abbotts Creek ^Wm. Turner Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

|1861 Jersey J. B. Jackson J. B. Jackson Azariah Williams 

1862 Lick Creek F. H. Jones J. B. Jackson Azariah Williams 

1863...... Abbotts Creek T. W. Tobey J. B. Jackson Azariah Williams 

1864 Thomasville W. H. Hammer Benjamin Lanier Azariah Wiliiams 

[865 (No Session Held On Account of Conditions Caused By Civil War) 

1866 Lick Creek W. T. Waters Benjamin Lanier J. H. Owen 

L867 Abbotts Creek Benjamin Lanier Benjamin Lanier J. H. Owen 

L868 Jersey W. H. Hammer Benjamin Lanier J. H. Owen 

L869 Abbotts Creek A. P. Stokes Wm. Turner J. H. Owen 

1870... 3 Big Creek Wm. Turner Wm. Turner J. H. Owen 

1871. . 2 Pine Meeting H. ...W. H. Wingate Wm. Turner J. H. Owen 

1872 New Friendship H. Morton J. H. Brooks J. L. Pleasant 

1873 Holloways Thomas Carrick H. Morton Thomas Carrick 

|874 Lick Creek A. F, Reed Wm. Turner Thomas Garrick 

875.. .4 Muddy Creek C. T. Bailey Wm. Turner Thomas Carrick 

||876 Reeds X Roads H. W. Reinhart Wm. Turner Thomas Carrick 

f|877 High Point J. B. Richardson Wm. Turner "..Henry Sheets 

I878...3 Big Creek H. W. Reinhart H. W. Reinhart Henry Sheets 

, (j.879 Liberty Harvey Hatcher H. W. Reinhart Henry Sheets 

>i|880 Holloways S.F.Conrad H. W. Reinhart Henry Sheets 

|881 Jersey Henry Sheets H. W. Reinhart Henry Sheets 

■882. ..4 Muddy Creek S. H. Thompson H. W. Reinhart Henry Sheets 

|883...2 Pine Meeting H. ...O. F. Gregory H. W. Reinhart Henry Sheets 

K884 Summerville S. H. Thompson ..Wm. Turner Henry Sheets 

||885 Lexington J. B. Richardson Wm. Turner Henry Sheets 

■ 886 Abbotts Creek J. B. Richardson Wm, Turner Henry Sheets 

l|887 Lick Creek Henry Sheets James Smith Henry Sheets 

1 888..:... Reeds X Roads C. Durham Wm. Turner Henry Sheets 

11889 New Friendship W. F. Watson James Smith Henry Sheets 

1 1890 Jersey J. M. Bennett James Smith Henry Sheets 

1 1891. ..2 Pine Meeting H. ...J. K. Fant James Smith Henry Sheets 



Minutes of the 



YEAR WHERE HELD PREACHER MODERATOR CLERK 

1892 High Point Henry Sheets James Smith Henry Sheets 

1893 Kernersville R. T. Bryan James Smith Henry Sheets 

1894 Holloways R. Vandeventor James Smith Henry Sheets 

1895 Pleasant Grove J. M. Hilliard James Smith Henry Sheets 

1836 Denton Henry Sheets James Smith Henry Sheets 

1897. ..5 Piney Grove W. H. Rich James Smith Henry Sheets 

1 89^ Rich Fork J. H. Lambeth James Smith Henry Sheets 

1899 Abbotts Creek S. B. Wilson lames Smith Henry Sheets 

1900 Reeds X Roads W. H. Rich James Smith Henry Sheets 

1901 Lexington C. A. G. Thomas James Smieh Henry Sheets 

1902 Lick Creek Henry Sheets James Smith Henry Sheets 

1903 Jersey W. A. Smith James Smith Henry Sheets 

1904. ..2 Pine Meeting H. ...Geo. P. Harrill Jamee Smith Henry Sheets 

1905 New Friendship John R. Miller James Smith Henry Sheets 

1906 Thomasville J. S. Farmer James Smith Henry Sheets 

1907 Wallburg R. T. Vann J. W. Nowell P. S. Vann 

1908 Denton M. L. Kesler J. W. Nowell P. S. Vann 

1909 Liberty S. D Swaim Henry Sheets P. S. Vann 

1910 Orphanage O. A. Keller Henry Sheets P. S. Vann 

1911 Abbotts Creek G. A. Martin Henry Sheets P. S. Vann 

1912 Stoners Grove O. A. Keller Henry Sheets P. S. Vann 

1913 Rich Fork M. L. Kesler Henry Sheets P. S. Vann 

1914 Holloways G. A, Martin G. A. Martin Henry Sheets 

1915 Center Hill O. A. Keller O. A. Keller Henry Sheets 

1916 Wallburg I. M. Mercer O. A. Kelier Henry Sheets 

1917 Smitn Grove Fred D. Hale R. S. Green Henry Sheets 

1918 Lexington M. L. Kesler R. S. Green : Archibald Johnson 

1919 Denton R. E. White R. S. Green Archibald Johnson 

1920 New Friendship J. S. Hardaway R. S, Green Archibald Johnson 

1921 Churchland M. L. Kesler R. S. Green Archbiald Johnson 

1922 Summerville W. A. Hough R. S. Green Paul C. Newton 

1923 Abbotts Creek W. L. Barrs Archibald Johnson Paul C. Newton 

1924 Reeds O. H. Trueblood Archibald Johnson Sam J. Smith 

1925 Liberty C. A. Owens Archibald Johnson Sam J. Smith 

1926 Rich Fork E. N. Gardner Archibald Johnson Sam J. Smith 

1927 Thomasville H. T. Penry Archibald Johnson Sam J. Smith 

1928 Holloways M. L. Kesler Archibald Johnson Sam J. Smith 

1929 Stoners Grove J. M. Hays Archibald Johnson Sam J. Smith 

1930 Abbotts Creek M. L. Kelser Archibald Johnson Sam J. Smith 

1931 Deciton M. O. Alexander G. Wilson Miller Sam J. Smith 

1932 Lexington G. A. Martin G. Wilson Miller Sam J. Smith 

1933 Lick Creek E. F. Mumford G. Wilson Miller Sam J. Smith 

1934 Jersey W. L. Warfford G. Wilson Miller Sam J. Smith 

1935 Mills Home E. C. Roach R. D. Covington Sam J. Smith 

1936 Reeds J. A. Neilson R. D. Covington Sam J. Smith 

1937 Churchland W. K. McGee R. D. Covington Sam J. Smith 

1938 Denton John A. McMillian G, Wilson Miller Sam J. Smith 

1939 Wallburg H. M. Stroup. R. D. Covington Sam J. Smith 

1940 Center Hill L. S. Gaines R. D. Covington Sam J. Smith 

1941 New Friendship N. C. Teague R. D. Covington Sam J. Smith 

1942 Abbotts Creek R. A. Herring H. M. Stroup Sam J. Smith 

1943 Lexington B. A. Mitchell H. M. Stroup Sam J. Smith 

1944 Thomasvile C. B. Atkinson H. M. Stroup A. L. Snider 

1945 Jersey V. W. Sears : N. C. Teague A. L. Snider 

1946 Denton J. Roy Clifford N. C. Teague A. L. Snider 

1947 Wallburg E. F. Baker N. C. Teague A. L. Snider 

1948 Smith Grove Charles F. Leek N. C. Teague A. L. Snider 

1949 Sheets Memarial ...J. O. Walton J. O. Walton A. L. Snider 

1. Is now High Point 3. Is now Eldorado 

2. Is now Churchland 4. Is now Clemmonsville 

5. Is now Wallburg 



Map of Liberty Baptist Association 
4 




PROGRAM 



□NE HUNDRED SEVENTEENTH 
ANNUAL MEETING OF THE 

Liberty Baprisf Association 

I - Tuesday and Wednesday, September 27 & a8> lg49 

SHEETS MEMORIAL BAPTIST CHURCH 
LEXINGTON. N. C. 

Theme: "Living and Working For Christ Todog" 



TUESDAY MORNING 

9:45 Devotion W. L. Gentry 

10:00 Report of program Committee A. L. Snider 

10:05 Roll call and appointment of Committees 

10:25 Report on church Music. . Mrs. E. E. Witherspoon 

10:40 Address on the Deacon B. C. Philpott 

10:55 Report on state of the Churches .... E. E. Baker 



11:20 Worship Period Music led by Carey Davis 

1 1 130 Sermon T. O. Walton 

12:10 Adjournment for Dinner. 

TUESDAY AFTERNOON 

1 :30 Devotion C. M. Pegram 

1 :45 Report on Christian Education 

O. W. Rodenheiser 

2:25 Report on Training Union G. C. Lewis 

2 150 Orphanage Dr. Zeno Wall 

3:15 State Missions J. Harvy Clark 



Address by M. A. Huggins, State Secretary 
:oo Adjournment 




WEDNESDAY MORNING 



9:45 Devotion Robert Taylor 

10:00 Sunday Schools Mrs. Mary G. Grice 

10:20 Report of Committees 

10:45 Music 

10:50 Associational Missionary W. Van Carroll 

1 1 :o5 Baptist Hospital Dr. Furman Covington 

11:30 Christian Literature L. A. Martin 

11 :5o Woman's Missionary Union Mrs. Beamer Barnes 

12:15 Adjournment for Dinner 



WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON 



1:30 




. D. W. Oldham 


1 :-45 




A. L. McGee 


2:05 


Ministers Retirement . . 


J. W. Dickens 


2:15 


American Bible Society 


Mrs. Grace Battle 


2:25 




J. Roy Clifford 


2:30 


Miscellaneous Business 


(Obituaries) 


2:45 




... E. C. Roach 


2:50 




Dr. A. S. Hale, 




Pastor 1st. Church, High Point. 


3:35 


Adjournment 





E. F. Baker, Program Chm. 
J. O. Walton, Vice Moderator 
A. L. Snider, Clerk 



MINUTES OF THE 

Liberty Baptist Association 

North Carolina 
1950 

0><=><e 



ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL SESSION 
HELD WITH 

HOLLOVVAYS AND STONERS GROVE BAPTIST CHURCHES 
SEPTEMBER 26 - 27, 1950 



Ox 



The next Session is to be held September 25 - 26, 1951 
With Greenwood and Rich Fork Baptist Churches 



MINUTES OF THE 



Liberty Baptist Association 

North Carolina 
1 950 

ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL SESSION 
HELD WJTH 

HOLLOWAYS AND STONEBS GROVE BAPTIST CHURCHES 
SEPTEMBER 26 - 27, 1950 

The next Session is to be held September 25 - 26, 1951 
With Greenwood and Rich Fork Baptist Churches 



2 



Minutes Of the Liberty Baptist Association 



INDEX 



Annual Sermon 

Constitution and By-laws. 



Committee Reports: 

Executive 

Finances 

Nominations 

Program 

Reports for Next Year 

Resolutions 

Time, Place and Preacher 



Directory, Asso. 

Historical Tables . 

Map of Association Inside of Back Cov 

Minutes of W. M. U 

Messengers 

Proceeding Reports: 

American Bible Society - 

Baptist Hospital I 

Baptist Training Union 

Christian Education i 

Home Goers f 

Home Missions 

Ministers Retirement 

Missionary, Associational 

Public Morals 

State of Churches 1 

Sunday Schools , 

W. M. U 

Statistical Tables 



Minutes of the Liberty Baptist Association 



3 



CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS 
Name 

Article 1. The name of the body shall be "The Liberty Baptist 
Association." 

Object 

Article 2. It shall be the object of this Association to furnish the 
Gospel (as we hold it) to the people within the bounds of the As- 
sociation, and to co-operate with the Baptist State Convention. 

Membership 

Article 3. The Association shall consist of the officers of the As- 
sociation, pastors of the churches of the Association, and messengers 
from the churches. Each shall be entitled to 3 messengers and 1 ad- 
ditional messenger for every 50 members or fraction thereof over and 
above 100 members. 

Officers 

Article 4. The officers of this Association shall be a moderator, 
vice-moderator, a clerk and a treasurer, all of whom shall be elected 
each year by the Association at its annual meeting and shall hold 
office until their successors are elected. The duties of the officers 
shall correspond to the duties of the same officers in like organi- 
zations, or as defined by the Association from time to time. 

Boards and Committees 

Article 5. The Association shall elect an Executive Committee each 
year whose duties shall be to look after having the gospel preached in 
all parts of the Association, and to attend to all business of the As- 
sociation between the session and to make such reports as they deem 
advisable at the annual meeting of the Association. The Association 
may appoint or elect such other boards or committees from time to 
time as circumstances may require. 

Time of Meeting 

Article 6. The Association shall meet annually on Tuesday after 
the fourth Sunday in September. The Moderator may, at the request 
of the Executive Committee change the time and place of meeting of 
this Association when it may be deemed by him not expedient to meet 
at the time or place appointed. 

Vacancies 

Article 7. The Moderator in concurrence with the Executive Com- 
mittee may fill any vacancy occuring between meetings of the Asso- 
ciation. 

Amendments 

Article 8. This Constitution may be amended at any regular session 
of the Association by a two-thirds vote of the number present. 

By-Laws 

No By-Laws adopted. This Association follows Kerfoot's Rules of 
Order for Parliamentary Authority. 

STANDING RESOLUTIONS 
Ordination of New Ministers 

1. It is strongly recommended as the position of this Association: 
That when a church desires to put forth a candidate for examination 
and approval for ordination to the full work of the Gospel Ministry, 
an Examining Council be summoned by written invitation of at least 
one week in advance from the church nominating the candidate, the 
Council to include the pastor and one member-at-large from each 
Baptist church in the fellowship of the Association. 

2. That the examination of the candidate be conducted publicly in 



4 



Minutes of the Liberty Baptist Association 



the auditorium of the nominating church, and prior announcement be 
given in good time so that all the brethren who wish to do so may- 
attend the examination. 

3. That we ordain only those who have received definite call to be- 
come pastor of a Baptist Church in regular standing in its Associa- 
tion which church shall have requested in writing his ordination be- 
fore the call of the ordaining council shall be approved. 

Organization and Admission of New Churches 
Recognizing the right of the Association to determine its own mem- 
bership and being aware of the importance of the manner in which 
new churches are organized, we recommend that any group of indi- 
viduals desiring to organize themselves into a new church, with the 
purpose of seeking the recognization of and fellowship and cooper- 
ation with this Association be requested to meet the following stand- 
ards : 

1. Notice shall be given to the Moderator of the Association of the 
desire to organize a church before any such organization takes place. 
The Moderator will then ask the Promotion Executive Committee to 
study and pass upon the need of and the practicability for such an 
organization. 

2. The location of said church shall be sufficiently removed so as 
not to interfere with the work or encroach upon the territory of the 
churches already affiliated with the Association. This will be deter- 
mined by the Promotion Executive Committee. 

3. Upon being approved by the Promotion Executive Committee 
the group will then request a council to examine the church covenant 
and the articles of faith of the proposed church. It is recommended 
that this connc'l consist of three pastors and three laymen of the AM 
sociat'on appointed by the Moderator: Should this council approve 
the covenant and articles of faith, the group will then proceed to be 
constituted into a Baptist Church of the same faith and order. 

4. The new church, having been duly organized and constituted, 
may at the next annual Association present a let f er to the Associa- 
tion asking for recognition and seeking fellowship with the Associa- 
tion, including with this letter a copy of the Articles of Faith and the 
Church Covenant adopted by the body, as well as a report of the 
work since time of organization as it regards all phases of our Bap- 
tist Program of Missions, Evangelism, Education, Social Service, 
Training, and Worship. 

5. The previously appointed council of 3 pastors and 3 laymen will 
examine the letter and reports of the newly organized church, and 
will recommend to the Association its acceptance or rejection as the 
case may be. 

Resolution in Regard to Program Committee 
That the Program Committee consist of the officers of the Asso- 
ciation, pastors of the entertaining churches and three persons named 
by the Moderator during the session of the Association. 

Resolution in Regard to Messengers 
That the names of messengers printed in the minutes include only 
those actually attending the Association from the delegations elected 
by the churches. 

Associations! Executive Committee 
Your committee recommends that: An Executive Committee of the 
Association be formed of 7 members, including the Moderator and 
Clerk of the Association, the Chairman of the Executive-Promotion 
Committee and 4 other members elected by the Association along with 
the other officers of the Association; to committee to attend to As- 
sociational business between the annual meeting, their actions to be 
reported to, and reviewed by the Association annually. (This Ex- 



Minutes of the Liberty Baptist Association 



5 



(iecutive Committee will transact Associational business; the Promo- 
tion-Executive Committee will promote the Association and Co-opera- 
tive Program as formerly.) 

Trustees 

(See Pg. 19,, 1948 Minutes) 
That the Association elect 3 Trustees to handle business and legal 
matters of the Association ; that they be elected for 2, 4, and 6 years 
respectfully on a rotating system, and not eligible for re-election for 
P years after expiration of term of office; that after this election the 
^Trustees shall be elected and serve for a period of 6 years. 

DIRECTORY OF ASSOCIATION 

(All Addressee herein are in North Carolina unless otherwise indicated) 
Officers 

J. O. Walton Moderator Mills Home, Thomasville 

Sam J. Smith Vice-Moderator Lexington 

A. L. Snider Clerk & Treasurer Box 96, Denton 

Promotion Executive Committee 

E. C. Roach, Chm Denton Denton 

C. F. Moore Abbotts Creek Rt. 2, High Point 

Howard Parks Center Hill , Rt. 7, Lexington 

H. Lomax Churchland Rt. I, Linwood 

A. L. Snider Denton Box 96, Denton 

Ik L. Owens Floyd Rt. 6, Lexington 

n C. Palmer Holloways : Rt. 6, Lexington 

(Beecher Cameron High Rock Rt. 1, Denton 

|H. L. Palmer Jersey Rt. I, Linwood 

Chas. Sigmon Lake View Rt. 7, Lexington 

iSam J. Smith , Lexington 1st Lexington 

:H. W. Buchanan Erlanger Erlanger 

Ij. W. Byars Sheets Memorial Lexington 

O. F. Hughes.. Liberty Rt. 2, Thomasville 

m. C. Cole Lick Creek Rt. I, Denton 

C. F. Motsinger New Friendship Rt. 5. Winston-Salem 

Earlie Carrick Mt. View Rt. 6, Lexington 

Coy Gordon „ Oak Hill Rt. 2, High Point 

Colon Yates Pleasant Plains Denton 

J. W. Myers Reeds t . Rt. 3, Lexington 

Willie Bowers Rich Fork Thomasville 

Roy G. Orrell Smith Grove Rt. I, Linwood 

I . E. Lookabill Stoners Grove Southmont 

E. L. Snider Summerville Rt. 1, Denton 

J. H Ov/ens Taylors Grove Rt. 2, New London 

Chas. F. Leek Thomasville 1st Thomasville 

Dewey Lindon Glennanna Thomasville 

W. H. Hilton Greenwood Thomasville 

■ O. Walton Mills Home Thomasville 

Nat Buckner Carolina Ave Thomasville 

Ira L. Bryant Reid Street Thomasville 

J. D. Williams South Side Thomasville 

Avery White Union Grove Rt. I, Lexington 

0. W. Rhodenheiser Wallburg Wallburg 

Joe Pierce Walters Grove Jackson Creek 

M. L. Craver Welcome Welcome 

Associational Executive Committee 

J. O. Walton, Chm. Thomasville F. F. Brown ....Thomasville 

A. L. Snider Box 96 Denton Chas. F. Leek Thomasville 

J. Harvey Clark Thomasville J. W. Crocker Erlanger 

C. M. Pegram Thomasville W. F. Gentry Rt. I, Linwood 

Associational Missionary Committee 

J. C. Walton, Chm Thomasville ^ 

\. L. Snider Denton Trustees 

M. C. Swicegood ....Rt. 3, Lexington 

*obt. J. Palmer Rt. 2, High Point S. B. Laws 1956 

I Roy Clifford Lexington u , . r 

VIorse Grant Thomasville Hubert ' ° hve 1954 

K H. Lomax Rt. 1, Linwood A. L. Snider 1952 

Associational Missionary 

W. Van Carroll ... Rt. 3, Lexington 



ASSOCIATIONAL AUXILIARIES 
W. M. U. 

Mrs. P. M. Hendrix Superintendent Lexington 

Mrs. J. T. Jackson Sec. Treas _ '. Lexington! 

Miss Helen Tate Y. P. Director Rt, Lexington 1 

Sunday School 

W. H. Lomax Associational Supt % Rt. I. Linwood 

Baptist Training Union 

G. C. Lewis Director 20! 2 Queen St., Winston- Salem 

State Institutions 
Mills Home, Thomasville 

W. C. Reid General Supt Thomasville 

Dr. I. G. Greer Chm. Board of Directors Chapel Hill 

R. E. Muth Treasurer Thomasville 

Officers: Baptist Schools, State Boards, and Institutions 
C. C. Wall, Trustee Mars Hill College Lexxington 

H. E. Olive, Chm. Board of Trustees Wake Forest College Lexington 

J. Roy Clifford, Chm. Hospital Board Lexington 

Chas. F. Leek Member State Board Thomasville 

Morse Grant Editor Charity Children Thomasville 

CHURCH DIRECTORY 

NAME WORKCHURCH ADDRESS 

Baker, S. D Paste- . Southside Thomasville 

Bishop, S. A Retired Erlanger Erla^g^r 

Broadway, B. V Pastor High Rock Rt. No. 1 Thomasville 

Brooks, D. P S. V/ Lexington First Lexington 

Clifford, J. Roy Pastor Lexington First Lexington 

Carroll, W. Van Asso. Miss... Reeds Church Rt. No. 3 Lexington 

Clark, J. Harvey Pastor Rich Fork Thomasville 

Cline, W. J Not stated South Side Thomasville 

Combs, J. A Retired. Thomasville Thomasville 

Crocker, J. W Pastor Erlanger Erlanger 

Dickens, J. W Pastor Senter Hill-Smiths Grove Rt. 7 Lev. 

Davis, J. T. Pastor. Sheets Memorial Lexington 

Dunn, J. O Pastor Lake View Box 955 Snencer 

Fdi'iger, C. C Pastor Stoners Grove Southmont 

Gallimore, A. R Missionary Lexington Wake Forest 

Gentry, W. F Pastor Churchland Linwood Rt. No. 1 

Harris, George C Not stated... Erlanger Erlanger 

Han man, O. M. Pastor Welcome-Liberty Winston Salem 

Hunt, H. T ..Evangelist P'easant Plains Denton 

Harmon, Lonnie Evangelist. Thomasville ... Thomasvi 1 !* 

Jarret, J. F Teacher Center Hill Lexington Rt. No. 7 

Jenkins, Clarence Pastor Oak Hill Thomasville 

Leek, Chas. F Pastor T'iomasville First Thomasville 

Lanning. Conrad Not stated Churchland . Linwood Rt. No 

Maier, F. A Rrt^rerl Thomasville First Thomasvfle 

Martin, G. A Retired Thomasville First Thomasvi"e 

Morton, M. T ..P. L Greenwood T'iomasville 

McGee, A. L Pastor Carolina Thomasville 

Oldham, D. W Pastor Greenwood Rt. No. 2 High Point 

Pegram, C. M Pastor Reed Street T' omaBvffl| 

Prince, C. C Chaplin Thomasville Thomasville 

Phillpot, Marry M Teacher Lexington First Gainsv ;1 h- CM 

Roach, E. C Pastor Denton First Denton 

Rhodenhiser, O. W Pastor Wallburg Wilbur? 

Phillips, Grover C Pastor Pheasant Plains Bennett 

Stewart, W. Reis Pastor Union Grove .. Wilson Ave. Wi^ston-S. 

Stewart, Inman P. L Reid St Thomasville 

Swicegood, M. C Pastor., Reeds Rt. No. 3 Lexington 

Taylor, Robert L Pastor Glennanna T'omasville 

Walton, I. O Pastor Mills Home Thomasville 

Wilson, S. B Retired New Friendship Rt. 5 Winston-S. 

Young, Charles Pastor Floyd Lexington 

MINISTERS LICENSED THIS YEAR .... 

Byrely, Claud Walters Grove Thomasville 

Carlton, Howard Sheets Memorial Lexington 

Davis, John Sheets Memorial Lexington 

MINISTFRIAL STUDENTS 
Everhart, Bill Lexington. 



Rollins, Leonard Lexington... 

Clark, Amos Sheets Memorial Lexington 



Minutes of the Liberty Baptist Association 



7 



Davis, John Sheets Memorial Lexington 

Hepler. Stewart Liberty Rt. No. 2 Thomasville 

Wagner, Donald Greenwood Thomasville 

CHOIR DIRECTORS 

Cary J. Davis Abbotts Creek Rt. 2, High Point 

Wade Jarrett Center Hill Rt. I. Linwood 

Mrs. Harry Crowell Churchland Rt. I. Linwood 

Mrs. Robert Carroll Denton Rt. 2, Lexington 

Lillie Curry Floyd Rt. 1. Denton 

Mrs. Max Myers High Rock Rt. I, Denton 

G. C. Palmer Holyways Rt. 6, Lexington 

Charles Watkins Lake View Rt. 1, Linwood 

R. L. Palmer. .Jersey Rt. 1, Linwood 

Mrs. L. A. Martin Lexington Lexington 

Taylor Myers Erlanger Erlanger 

Claudie Waisner Sheets Memorial Lexington 

Mrs. L. E. Hepler Liberty Rt. 2, Thomasville 

Lick Creek Rt. I, Denton 

Mallary Carrick Mountain View Rt. 6, Lexington 

Robert Harkman New Friendship Rt. 4, Winston-Salem 

Howard Seegers Oak Hill Thomasville 

Grover C. Phillips Pleasant Plains Bennett 

Mrs. C. W. Snider Reeds Rt. 3, Lexington 

Wilber Lewis Rich Fork High Point 

H. F. Grubb Smiths Grove Rt. 4, Salisbury 

Mrs. George Fowler Stoners Grove Southmont 

Paul Bean^. Summerville Denton 

| Mrs. Charles Finch Thomasville Thomasville 

Willie Gilliam , .. Carolina Ave Thomasville 

j L. W. Hansel Glennanna Thomasville 

j Lucille Reid Mills Home _ Thomasville 

I Ira L. Bryant Reid Street Thomasville 

j J. C. Creed.... South Side Thomasville 

I George Pope ..Union Grove Rt. 1, Lexiigtoi 

| M rs. Ben King Walburg Rt. 6, Winston-Salem 

i Lee Halton Waiters Grove Rt. 2, Lexington 

E. L. Davis Welcome Welcome 

MESSENGERS TO ASSOCIATION 

ABBOTTS CREEK: Sharyn Bodenheimer, Mrs. Numa Everhart, Mrs. D. S. 
Haywood, Mrs. W. T. Hedgecock, Mr. and Mrs. John Spur<?eon, Mrs. C. B. 
Uavis, Bess Wheeler, Mrs. Willie Bodenheimer, Mrs. Jake Weavil. Mrs. Ray 
! Hayworth, Chas. F. Moore, Mrs. John Spurgeon, Jr., Chas. W. Green, Grace 
tureen. C. G. Green, Mrs. C. G. Green, Miss Minnie Hayworth, Mrs. W. P. 
Davis W. R. Greer, Floyd Davis Royal. Mrs. Cora J. Davis, Mrs. L. B. Moore. 
^ rS V L a ^ ra , Moore > D - c - Bodenheimer, Jr., Mrs. Clyde Bodenheimer, Mrs. 
Charlie Bodenheimer, Mrs. Chester Spurgeon, Mrs. Bertie Lydo, Mr?.. Ivey 
Bodenheimer, Pansy Bodenheimer, Mrs. Sanford Bodenheimer, Carey Davis. 

CENTER HILL: Mrs. Clinton Mabry, Mrs. Wade Holmes, Mrs. Hugh Miller. 
I r w7 t • Hun x t i Mrs - J - W - Sickens. Lenn Jarrett. J. Wade Jarrett. Mrs. 
I W - Jarrett, Mrs. S. E. Jarrett, Mrs. Willie Beck, J. W. Dickens, Sam 
Jarrett. 

CHURCHLAND: Mrs. Dezma Hege, Mrs. Paul Kestler, Mrs. W. K. Barber, 
W. F. Gentry. W. K. Barber. Mrs. Dezma Hege. Mrs. Paul Kestler. Mrs. W. F. 
Gentry, Miss Irene Gentry, Glenn Barnes, Mrs. Glenn Barnes. Mrs. W. H. 
Lomax, Mrs. W. S. Barnes, W. H. Lomax. 

Tvi?7«2r''p R " M V He . nders ° n . E C Roach, R. C. Wall, Gladys Tysinger. Pallie 
Tysinger, Emma Tysinger, Mrs. H. M. Snider, Mrs. J. R. Smith, W. R. Snider, 
Mr. and Mrs. V K Skeen Mrs. J. J. Snider. Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Keever 
Mrs. Ben Carroll, Mrs. C. E. Clyatt. 

FLOYD: Mrs. D. L. Owen, Mrs. John Meisenheimer, Mrs. Maggie Floyd. Troy 
tSeanblossom. J 

P&K. Mrs B T'v M B„a C dwt y ^ Z ' L ' M — 

P'K F&p*?",: ^Ms. c p ; c a -. Bfe M ,£ 

W££T'J?I e -*R: R-Beanblossom Mr,. Bill Owen. Melvin Carrick. Mrs. Ada 




Ik"! B ?« 1 9 eo ;. W .? rkman ' Mrs - G«>rse Owens. W. E. Shirley,' Mrs W E 
KZA Sr'ri'ct ^ ^ ^ ^ M ^«- 5- * ^ 



8 



Minutes of the Liberty Baptist Association 



JERSEY: Mrs. Dova Lemly, Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Roach, Helen Tate, D. R. 
Smith, Mrs. R. L. Palmer, Mrs. John Copley, Mrs. W. L. Smith, Mrs. C. A. 
Smith, W. K. Trexler, J. N. Penninger, Jr., Mrs. J. N. Penninger, Mrs. J. R. 
Surratt. 

LAKE VIEW: Mrs. J. O. Dunn, Mrs. Luther Snider, Mrs. C. A. Sharpe, Mrs. 
Paul Leonard, Floyd Gullett, J. O. Dunn. 

LEXINGTON 1ST. B. C. Philpott, Jr., J. E. Starr, Sam J. Smith, F. G. John- 
son, Mrs. James L. Fry, Mrs. J. E. Starr, Mrs. L. L. Fry, Mrs. B. F. Lee, Mrs. 
E. E. Morgan, Sr., Mrs. P. M. Hendrix, Mrs. Carroll Wall, B. F. Lee, G. W. 
Miller, Mrs. G. T. Freezor, H. C. Myers, Jihn A. Sink, J. Roy Clifford, Miss 
Roxie Sheets, Mrs. J. Roy Clifford. 

ERLANGER: Mrs. Sidney Everhart, Mrs. E. T. McDade, Mrs. James Crocker, 
Mrs. Smith Crow, Mrs. T. R. Koontz, T. R. Koontz, H. W. Buchanan, Mrs. 
Dewey Snider, James W. Crocker. 

SHEETS MEMORIAL: Mrs. Marvin Smith, Mrs. Harold Kinney, Mrs. J. J. 
Carrick, Mrs. H. H. Carlton, Mrs. John Lemley, Bill Lohr, Mr. John Lemley, 
Mrs. Howard Parks, Mrs. Bill Lohr, J. T. Davis, Mrs. Crawford Miller, Mrs. 
W. R. Harris, J. W. Byars, Odis Frank, Mrs. J. H. Guffey, Mrs. Chas. Yar- 
borough, Mrs. J. T. Davis, Mrs. W. E. Anderson. 
LIBERTY: Mrs. Lacie Buie, Mrs. Lena Buie. 

LICK CREEK: Mrs. W. A. Jarvis, J. C. Reid, David Kinney, Henry McDowell, 
W. A. Jarvis, W. L. Buie, E. R. Wall. 

MT. VIEW: Mrs. Harris Wall, Julia Carrick, Mrs. Earlie Carrick. 

NEW FRIENDSHIP: Mrs. C. F. Motsinger, Mrs. Geo. Nading, Mrs. G. Swaim, 

Mrs. Allen Jones, Farris Swaim, C. F. Motsinger. 

OAK HILL: Mrs. Ray Hill, Mrs. Brad Sechrest, Mrs. Walter Mathias, Mrs. 
Ray Underwood, K. C. Lambeth, Mrs. Clarence Jenkins, Clarence Jenkins, 
Mrs. I. C. Beck, Mrs. J. W. Lee, Mrs. Coy Kennedy, Mrs. W. H. Busse, Mrs. 
Dewey Wilson, Mrs. Haywood Lambeth. 

PLEASANT PLAINS: Mrs. Calvin Loflin, Mrs. Colon Yates, Mrs. Mami- Lofli^. 
REEDS: W. V. Carroll, E. A. Snyder, Mrs. Early Snider, M. C. Swicegood, 
Luther Morphis, Mrs. J. W. Morphis, Mrs. Alda Craver, Mrs. W. L. Craver, 
Mrs. G. Koontz, Mrs. W. V. Carroll. 

RICH FORK: Bruce Ball, Mrs. W. M. Edinger, Mrs. Elmer Sizemore, Mrs. 
W M. Edinger, Mrs. J. H. Clark, Mrs. H. S. Embry, Mrs. Gilbert Myers, J. H. 
Clark, Grady Kanoy, T. H. Small. 

SMITH GROVE: Mrs. Roy G. Orrell, Mrs. Herman Orrell. 

SUMMERVILLE: Chas. S. Young, Mrs. E. L. Newsom, Mrs. Dorothy Carrick, 
David K. Parker, Henry Parker, Jr., Mrs. Henry Parker, Jr., Mrs. John Gal- 
iimore, Mrs. Fred Loftin, Mrs. Luther Buie, Mrs. V/ill Davis, Mrs. L. C. Car- 
rick, Mrs. Fred Owens, Mrs. Hubert Carrick. 

STONERS GROVE: Mrs. Fred Wafford, Mrs. Pearlie Fine, Mrs. Mary Beckner, 
Mrs. Herbert Wafford, Mrs. Arlis Roach, Hugh Wafford, Mrs. E. H. Wafford, 
Mrs. G. L. Lemly, Mrs. Bduce Coleman, Fred Wafford, Mrs. Conrad Wafford, 
Mrs. Fannie Beck, Mrs. Marvin Fine, O. L. Stoner, Mrs. G. C. Freezor, Theresa 
Freezor, John Lookabill, C. C. Edinsrer, Mrs. Hugh Wafford, Mrs. Geo. Fow- 
E. Lookabill, Mrs. C. C. Edinger, Mrs. L. E. Lookabill, Mrs. A. F. 
Wafford, Mrs. John Penry, I. A. Smith. 

THOMASVILLE 1ST: J. L. Ward, Jr., Mrs. Chas. F. Leek, Mrs. Chas. C. 
Prince, Mrs. R. G. Gennings, Mrs. J. L. Ward, Jr., Mable Poole, C. C. Prince, 
Chaplin, Chas. F. Leek. 

CAROLINA AVE: A. L. McGee, Mabel Ingram, Mrs. Fred Young, Mrs. Willie 
Uilliam, Miss Gaye Lanier, Myrtle Smith 

£, L £ NN ^ NN r^ : Aver y Smith, L. W. Hansel, Mrs. T. L, Payne, Mrs. G. M 
M^^kd 1, Dewey Lyndon, Robert Taylor, Mrs. T. C. Smith, Mr. T. C. Smith. 
GREENWOOD: Mrs. Ethel Maley, Mabel V/hite, Mrs. Willard Byerly, Mrs. 
2S? P,™ rl £ Mrs - W - N - Parker - David Oldham, Mrs. David Oldham. 
MILLS HOME: Franklin Bailey, Mrs. C. L. Hamlin, Romulus Scaggs, Morse 
Cyant, M * ss S r alIie McCracken, Mrs. B. F. Strickland, R. E. Muth, W. P. Edinger, 
Mrs. J. O. Walton, J. O. Walton. 

REID STREET: Wilson Culp, Ruby Culp, C. M. Pegram, W. B. Pressley, Mrs. 
L. Hmkle, Mrs. J. B. Scarboro. 

SOUTHSIDE: Henry Myers, Mrs. Lola Harrison, Mrs. S. D. Baker, Mrs. J. C. 
Creed. J 
UNI°N GROVE: Mrs Avery White, Mrs. Reid Stewart, W. Reid Stewart. 
WALTERS GROVE: Mrs. Lindsay Hunt, Mrs. Carl Gallimore, Mrs. John 
Yates, Mrs. David Surratt, Mrs. J. A. Gallimore. 

WALLBURG: Maskey M. Smith, Mrs. M. M. Smith, Rev. and Mrs. O W 
Rhodenheiser, Everett Swaim, Mrs. O. H. Rothrock. 

WELCOME: O. M. Hartman, Carrie N. Haynes, Mrs. H. L. Wilkes, W. S 
Disher, E. S. Craver, W. H. Snider, C. S. Haynes. 

VISITORS: Mrs O. L. Wrenn, Rev. Carl Hemphill, Rev. Victor Fritts, Mrs. 
i a L * J reeZor l„ Mrs ^ Marvin Hedrick, Prof. M. H. Kendall, Mrs. Coy Fine, 
t \ a /, tes " J^ rs - £ rnest Turne - Mrs. r. A. Yates G. D. Smith, Mrs. Delia 

Loflin, Mrs. Clay Manning, Rev. H. M. Stroup, Rev. L. B. Reavis, Barbara 
Fritts, Mrs Harvey Owens, Richard K. Young, H. G. Peters, David Weavil, 
Norman Wilkes. 



Minutes of the Liberty Baptist Association 



9 



PROCEEDINGS 

ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL SESSION 

Liberty Baptist Association 

HELD WITH 

HOLLOWAYS AND STONERS GROVE BAPTIST CHURCHES 
SEPTEMBER 26 - 27, 1950 
FIRST DAY 

(1) Tuesday, Sept. 26th, 1950 at 9:45 a.m. the Liberty Association 
iras assembled in its one hundred and eighteenth Annual Session 
pth Stoners Grove Church, Southmont, N. C. 

(2) Moderator, J. O. Walton, called the meeting to order for the 
ransaction of business. 

(3) The Opening Song was "All Hail the Power of Jesus Name" 
"he devotion following was conducted by Rev. M. C. Swicegood, 
astor of Reeds Church. Scripture used was John 20-19-23. Subject 

lised "Christ the Answer". Followed by song "Amazing Grace", 
f (4) A. L. Snider Associational Clerk of Denton Church, read the 
teport of the program committee. The report of the program com- 
jhittee was adopted subject to any changes deemed advisable as the 
Meeting proceeds. 

TUESDAY MORNING 
Theme; "Christ The Answer" 



9:45 Devotion M. C. Swicegood 

j0:00 Report of Program Committee A. L. Snider 

0:05 Roll Call and Appointment of Committees 

0:25 Report on Church Music Mrs. C. C. Prince 

;0:40 Address, "Prayer Changes Things" A. L. McGee 

0:55 Report on State of Church J. Roy Clifford 

1:15 Worship Period, Music led by Carey Davis 

11:35 Sermon ___ C. M. Pegram 

j2:10 Adjourn For Noon Hour 

TUESDAY AFTERNOON 
"Christ the Answer in State Missions" 

1:30 Devotion J. W. Croker 

1:45 Report on Christian Education J. T. Davis 

1:50 Visitors Recognized from Colleges 

2:00 "Christ and Our Colleges" M. H. Kendall 

2:25 Report on Training Union G. C, Lewis 

2:35 Report on Snnday School W. H. Lorn ax 

2,55 Report of Associational Missionary W. Vann Carroll 

3:10 State Missions C. C. Edinger 

3:15 Address E. L. Spivey 

WEDNESDAY MORNING 
"Christ the Answer to Human Needs" 

9:45 Devotion Clarence Jenkins 

0:00 W. M. U . ^ Mrs. P, M. Hendrix 

0:20 Report of Committees and Election of Officers 

0:45 Hospital Chas. F. Leek 

Address on Hospital R. K. Young 

1:15 Christian Literature Morse Grant 

1 :35 Music 

1:45 Orphanage W. C. Reid 

2:15 Noon Hour 



10 



Minutes of the Liberty Baptist Association 



WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON 

"Christ is the Answer in World Missions" 

1:30 Devotion Inman Stewart 

1:45 Public Morals W. F. Gentry 

2:05 Ministers Retirement J. F. Freeman 

2:20 American Bible Society Miss Sallie McCrackin 

2:30 Home Missions _ Mrs. C. C. Wall 

2:40 Miscellaneous Business (Obituaries) 

2:55 Foreign Missions Mrs. J. B. Powell 

3:00 Address L. B. Reavis, Pastor Green Street Church, High Point 

3:35 Adjourn. 

Program committee request that all written reports be limited to 250 
words or less, and typad. Program Committee, 

J. Roy Clifford, Chm., S. B. Laws, J. O. Walton, 
O. W. Rhodenhiser, A. L. Snider 

(5) At this time a motion was made to have Bro. W. C. Reid 
Supt. of Mills Home first on the program on Wednesday representing 
the Orphanage that he might also go ,to Oxford for a meeting on 
the same day, this was adopted. 

(6) Hymn "At the Cross." 

(7) Executive Committee report regarding Evangelistic campaign 
for 1951 was read and adopted at this time. No report turned in. 

(8) Address on prayer changes things by Rev. A. L. McGee of 
Carolina Ave. Church was made at this time. 

(9) Visitors recognized at this time were : Rev. H. M. Stroup, 
Chaplin C. C. Prince, Rev. Hemphill Trivett, R. E. Muth. 

New Pastors were: Rev. J. W. Crocker, Erlanger; Rev. Clarence 
Jenkins, Oak Hill Memorial; Rev. Luther Morphis, Rev. W. R. Stew- 
art, Union Grove ; Rev. M. C. Swicegood, Reeds. 

(10) Hymn "There is a Fountain Filled With Blood". 

(11) Report on Church Music was prepared and presented by Mrs. 
C. C. Prince of Thomasville 1st. 

(12) Report on State of the Churches was prepared and presented 
by Rev. J. Roy Clifford of Lexington 1st. Church. 

Report of the State of the Churches 

Letters of the churches to Liberty Association make it plain that 
the past year was a year of worthy achievements for the l ord, 
new mission, Eastside, Lexington, was established during the past J 
summer by Sheets Memorial Church. The work is thriving and now 
is carried on in the new building provided by the sponsoring church. 
There were 753 baptisms, an average of 1 per 12.5 members. 21 
churches and 2 missions have preaching services each Sunday. Sun- 
day School enrollment has reached 9,924 a gain of 957 over the pre- 
ceding year. 22 churches and missions report B. T. U. organizations 
with the units totaling 101. The W. M. U. lists a total of 166 units, 
a gain of 46 over last year. 

Gifts to all Missions causes amounted to $64,317.67, a decrease of 
$2,025.33. Offerings for local expenses were $222,754.51, an advance 
of $264.22 over last year. The grand total of offerings reported was 
$288,517.41, a loss of $315.88. 

There are 5 churches reporting no baptisms, and 7 churches listed 
as not contributing to the program of Associational Missions. Notice 
is taken of the eminently successful association-Avide School of Mis- 
sions held last March, and attention is called to the Simultaneous 
Evangelistic Crusade scheduled for March 25-April 8, 1951. Liberty 
Association should have 100% co-operation in this Crusade. The 
churches report 1936 non-resident members. The problem of the 



Minutes of the Liberty Baptist Association 



11 



ion-resident should be studied and dealt with in the wisest way pos- 
ible. Respectfully submitted, 

J. Roy Clifford 

(13) Worship period in music lead by Gary Davis of Abbotts Creek 
"hurch. 

(14) The annual sermon was delivered by Rev. C. M. Pegram 
alternate of Reed Street Church in the absence of Dr. Zeno Wall. 
Scripture used for subject was Romans 8:1-17. Subject: "What Shall 
We Do With Jesus." Benediction by Rev. J. Roy Clifford. Ad- 
ourned 12:10 for noon hour. 

Tuesday Afternoon 
Christ the Answer in State Missions 

(15) At 1 :30 P.M. the meeting was called to order and the de- 
motion was conducted by Rev. J. W. Crocker of Erlanger church, 
rlymn "Blessed Assurance Jesus Is Mine." 

I (16) Visitors recognized : Dr. Phil Elliott of Boiling Springs, L. 
3. Reavis of Green Street church High Point and Dewey Smith of 
Sreen Street. 

j (17) Report on Christian Education was prepared and presented 
>y Rev. J. T. Davis, Pastor of Sheets Memorial Church. The report 
vas adopted. 

REPORT ON CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

! Southern Baptist are displaying renewed and increasing interest in 
Christian education. They are builing and supporting Baptist Col- 
leges as never before. In the institutions themselves, rapid strides 
ire being made in the direction of coordination of effort, increased 
efficiency and financial stabilization. Serious problems lie ahead, how- 
ever, problems which must be anticipated and solved if continued im- 
provements is to be maintained. 

Sisrns of Progress 

1. Endowment and property values of the three seminaries, one 
missionary training school, 29 senior colleges and universities, 
23 junior colleges and seven academies increased during 1949-50 
to $125,247,836.75 a gain of approximately ten millions. 

2. Exactly fifty per cent of our colleges and schools are conduct- 
ing campaigns for buildings or endowments or both. 

3. Fourteen of our colleges and schools, including the seminaries 
and the W. M. U. Training School, are offering graduate 
courses. A total of 1,560 students are working toward advanced 
degrees, 467 in theological and 1,093 in academic fields. 

The Best Education 
The best education is not necessarily that provided bv the largest 
nstitution. Only five absolutely necessary characteristics mark the 
:ollege in which a worthy Christian education can be secured: (1) a 
scholarly and consecrated faculty : (2) adequate and upto date course 
offerings in several denartments : (3) a Library properly administered 
md furnished with sufficient and well selected books and periodicals : 
[4) laboratory equipment in suitable quantity and quality for the 
science departments maintained and (5) an undergirding, permeating 
itmosphere of Christian culture. 

A Look Ahead 

With more students in our 64 schools and colleges than ever be- 
fore, with more scholarship on our faculties than at any time in the 
im'st, with many new, functional buildings under construction, with 
:he libraries meeting higher standards, with a religious education pro- 
gram in which all students may participate, with a comprehensive 
physical and health education program fitted to the needs of 55,000 
students in our colleges and schools today, there is every reason to 



12 Minutes of the Liberty Baptist Association 



believe in a great future for Christian Education among Southern 
Baptist. We must accept responsibility, plan courageously, work 
diligently, exercise faith in God and never falter. 

Respectfully submitted, 
J. T. Davis 

(18) Dr. Phil Elliott, President of Gardner Webb College spoke 
on "Christ and Our Colleges.', Same subject was also discussed by 
M. H. Kendall of Mars Hill College. 

(19) Report on Sunday Schools was prepared and presented by 
Brother W. H. Lomax layman of Churchland Church. The report 
was discussed by Rev. L. B. Reavis of Green Street Church' High 
Point. Report was adopted. 

Associational Sunday School Report 
Jesus the Master was a great teacher. He chose teaching and 
preaching as the two main means of extending the kingdom of God 
on earth. He committed this great task to the churches. The 
churches therefore, must teach as well as preach if they are to be 
obedient to the command and commission of Jesus. 

Our Association accepted the three year program of the Sunday 
School Department of our great Convention October, 1949 — October, 
1952. On September 25th, an Associational Planning meeting was I 
conducted at the First Baptist Church of Thomasville for the pur- 
pose of training teams to present the 1949-50 Program to each church 
in the Association. 

From October 10th to October 19th, the Program was presented 
to 32 churches by 15 teams composed of two or more members. There 
were 4 churches in which we did not have the privilege to visit or 
present the program. Most of the churches in which the program 
was presented set goals or aims for the year as follows : 37 new 
classes, 13 new departments, 29 Vacation Bible Schools, 28 agreed to 
conduct one or more training courses. Practically all the churches 
agreed to put more emphasis on Evangelism in the Sunday School. 
Several agreed to do something definite about their building needs. 
All the goals may not have been reached but I am sure we all agree 
that we do more when there is a well planned program for us to 
follow. 

The Associational Sunday School organization has met regularly 
each quarter. The first meeting was with the Sheets Memorial 
Church on October 30, with 14 churches represented, 8 pastors pre- 
sent, 9 superintendents, with a total of 85. The second meeting was 
with th_e Glennana Church on January 29th, with 20 churches repre- 
sented, 10 pastors present, 11 superintendents, with a total of 165. 
The third meeting was with Reeds Church on April 30th with 13 
churches represented, 6 pastdors present, S superintendents, with a 
total of 125. The fourth meeting was with the Holloways Church 
with 13 churches represented, 2 pastors present, 6 superintendents, 
with a total of 45. There were 4 Associational officers meetings in 
addition to the regular quarterly meetings. In the July meeting it 
was unanimously voted to change the Associational Sunday School 
meetings from the 5th Sunday of each quarter to Thursday night 
following the second Sunday of each .month. 

The total enrollment of the Sunday School this year is 9,924, a gain 
of 95. Average attendance 5,275, a gain of 624. Vacation Bible 
Schools this year, 32 — a gain of 4 schools. Enrollment of the Bible 
Schools 3,587, a gain of 654. It gives me great pleasure to report 
the above with many other achievements during the year. As we 
look over the progress of last year, let us keep in mind the great 
tpsk ahead and be obedient to the command and commission of Jesus. 
Matthew 28: 19-20 Go Ye therefore and teach all nations, baptizing 
them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy 



Minutes of the Liberty Baptist Association 



13 



i Ghost. Teaching them to observe all things whatsoever I have com- 
i manded you: and lo, I am with you always, even unto the end of 
; the world. Respectfully submitted, 

W. H. Lomax 

(20) Report on the Training Union was prepared and presented 
by Brother G. C. Lewis of New Friendship Church. Report was 
j adopted, also was discussed by Bro. Lewis. 

ASSOCIATIONAL TRAINING UNION ANNUAL REPORT 

The Associational T. U. has had a very successful year through the 
cooperation of the associational and local T. U. officers and our As- 
sociational Missionary, Mr. W. V. Carroll. 

The Clinic conducted in High Point for associational officers was 
well attended by our officers and leaders. 

Executive Committee Meetings, Officers' and Leaders' Councils, 
and Mass Meetings have been conducted each quarter at a scheduled 
j time. Attendance has been most encouraging at each meeting. 

The following activities have been promoted throughout the year: 
Prayer Meeting Attendance, The Bible Readers' Crusade, Christian 
Home Week, Youth Week, and one Study Course in each church, 
j Reports received from the churches have been most encouraging in 
j regard to the above activities. 

Tournament work progressed in a fine way this year with a good 
i number participating. Our Liberty Association received State recog- 
| nition again this year when the following girls were declared State 
: winners in the Junior Memory Work Tournament : Eva Atwood and 
j Reba Bates, Sheets Memorial Church; Janet Hilton and Jean Brown, 
| New Friendship Church ; and Violet Houser, Mills Home Church. 
I This is the second consecutive year that Bates and Brown have been 
\ State winners. 

The following goals are suggested for the coming year : 
; 1. Six new Training Unions organized. 
| 2. Fully graded unions in each church with a T. U. 
I 3. That associational officers provide teachers and conduct methods 
j, classes in churches desiring to organize a T. U. 
1 4. That each church enter participants in the Tournament work. 
The following officers and leaders are recommended to serve next 



8 year : 

I GENERAL DIRECTOR _ _ _ G. C. Lewis 

(' ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR To be selected 

! SECRETARY AND TREASURER To be selected 

\ CHORISTER Carey J. Davis 

\ PIANIST Peggy Barnes 

\ ADULT LEADER M. F. Brown 

: YOUNG PEOPLES' LEADER Gene Smith 

INTERMEDIATE LEADER Troy Jarrett 

! TUNIOR LEADER _ To be selected 

STORY HOUR LEADER Mrs. Wilburn Snider 

GROUP LEADERS Mrs. Paul Kessler 

W. H. Palmer 
J. Roy Clifford 
Mrs. W. V. Carroll 
Mrs. Florence Waters 

PASTOR ADVISOR James W. Crocker 



Respectfully submitted, 
G. C. Lewis 

(21) Associational Missionary Report was prepared and presented 
by the Associational Missionary, Rev. Van Carroll. Report was 
' adopted. 



14 



Minutes of the Liberty Baptist Association 



ASSOCIATIONAL MISSIONARY'S ANNUAL REPORT 
In Churches of Our Association For 200 Meetings As Follows: 



Sermons and Addresses Delivered 59 

Sunday School Classes Taught 23 

Other Services Visited in 63 

Training Union and W. M. U. Study Courses Taught 4 

Presentation of V. B. S. and V. B. S. Conferences 8 

Promoted Our Association-Wide Week's Emphasis on 
Missions in Which 28 Churches Participated. 

Vacation Bible Schools, Principal of 6 

Individual, Group and Committee Conferences 142 

MEETINGS ATTENDED IN OUR ASSOCIATION 

Associational Conference for launching Mission Week Emphasis. 

Associational Sunday School Meetings of various kinds 13 

Associational Vacation Bible School Clinic. 

Associational Training Union Meetings, various kinds 10 

Associational Youth Rally. 

Associational W. M. U. Meetings of various kinds 3 

Associational R. A. and G. A. Conclave. 

Associational Deacons' Meetings, Planning Meetings too 5 

Participated in Christmas Service — Davidson Co. Home for Aged. 

MEETINGS ATTENDED OUTSIDE OUR ASSOCIATION: 

State Associational S ; S. and T. U. Officers' Meetings 2 

Sunday School and Training Union Enlargement Campaigns 2 

State S. S. Bible Teaching Clinic, Durham. 
Caswell Sunday School Assembly. 



Conducted Associational S. S. Planning Meetings in Surry, Ashe, 

Yadkin and Stony Fork Associations. 
State Vacation Bible School Clinic, Fruitland. 

Regional Training Union Meetings 2 J 

Helped in Surry Associational V. B. S. Clinic. 
Divisional R. A. Conclave, Clemmons. 

Other State Meetings : Asso. Missionaries' Conference, Evangelistic 

Conference, two State Conventions. 
Group Meeting to raise Hospital Fund, Winston-Salem. 
Baptist World Alliance, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Letters and Cards mailed 2,242 

Published six issues of THE LIBERTY RECORDER, mailed 3,152 
copies. Distributed 240 Associational Calendars for the year. Traveled 
10,350 miles. Respectfully submitted, 

W. V. Carroll 

(22) Hymn — "Alas and Did My Saviour Bleed." 

(23) Report on State Missions was prepared and presented by 
Rev. C. C. Edinger Pastor of Stoners Grove, Jersey and Holyways 
Churches. The report was discussed by Dr. M. A. Huggins, State 
Secretary, Raleigh. The report was adopted. No written report. 

After Brother Huggin's message the meeting adjourned to meet 
Wednesday morning at 9:45 with Holyways Church. Benediction 
by Rev. S. D. Baker of South Side Church Thomasville. 

Wednesday Morning 

(24) The meeting was called to order by the Moderator, Rev. J. O. 
Walton at 9:45 a.m. 

(25) The opening hymn used was "Stand Up For Jesus". 

(26) Devotion was conducted by Bro. W. C. Reed Supt. of Mills i 
Home. Scripture was taken from John 10:1 through 11. After the 
devotion Bro. Reed made a report on Mills Home. 

(27) Report on the W. M. U. was prepared and presented by Mrs. 



Minutes of the Liberty Baptist Association 



15 



P. M. Hendrix of the First Church of Lexington. She also discussed 
the .report. The report was adopted. 

W. M. U. REPORT 1950 

The year 1949 was important in the annals of W. M. U. history in 
that it saw the close of the first half of the twentieth century. 

History has recorded and will continue to record spectacular events 
and achievements during this century, but no less spectacular will be 
some of the history of W. M. U. work. 

Some years ago when W. M. U. was in its comparative infancy one 
of our beloved leaders, Miss Fannie Heck, wrote that she had a vision 
in which she saw a great host of women leading children by the 
hands. We know today that her vision has materalized. In N. C. 
land our Southland we have a great host of women and young people 
working hand in hand "laboring together with God to make known 
to the sons of men His mighty acts and the glory of the majesty of 
His Kingdom." 

Our Liberty W. M. U. is but a small part of the whole great organi- 
jzation, but we can look back over 1949, feeling that we helped to a 
[certain extent in carrying out our theme "that the world may know." 
j Four W. M. S. and fifteen Young People's organizations main- 
tained an A-l rating. Special mention is made of Erlanger, which 
was one of the eleven fully graded A-l unions in N. C. for 1949. 

Special events such as leadership conferences, Young Peoples' Rally, 
land Camps Mission Study and Community Missions Institutes were 
helpful and well attended. 

Continuation of the Scholarship Fund is helping a worthy student 
training for special mission work. 

Total gifts of W. M. S. and Young Peoples' organizations for 1949 
were $16,268.39, an increase over 1943. 

As an association we failed in two points in 1949. We did not at- 
tain our financial and new organization gaols. 

Life is made up of successes and failures. As we go into this last 
quarter of 1950, we realize that this last half of the twentieth century 
|will open new doors of opportunity. May we profit by our failures 
'as we accept anew our challenging 1950 theme, "Abounding in the 
(Work of the Lord". 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mrs. P. M. Flendricks 

(29) Your committee to nominate officers for next year makes its 
'eport as follows: 

Moderator J. O. Walton 

Vice-Moderator Sam J. Smith 

Clerk-Treasurer A. L. Snider 

ASSOCIATIONAL 
Executive Committee Missionary Committee 

J. O, Walton J. O. Walton, Chm. 

A, L. Snider A. L. Snider, Clerk 

J. Haryey Clark M. C. Swicegoed 

CM. Pegram Rodert J. Palmer 

F. F. Brown J. Roy Clifford 

Chas. F. Leek Morse Grant 

J. W. Crocker W. H. Tomax 

W. F. Gentry. 

Trustee: S. B. Laws 1956 

^.ssociational Recorder Representative Miss Dorcas Clinard 

Missionary W. Van Carroll 

Sunday School Supt. W. H. Lomax 



16 



Minutes of the Liberty Baptist Association 



" Music Director Carey Dav 

Pianist __Mrs. J. 0. Walto 

This committee recommends that the motion carried last year that j 
change be made in the by-laws as follows: In article 4 that the moderate] 
should be elected for a limit of 2 years only, be rescinded, and that it b 
made to read as previously stated: "That he shall hold office until his sue 
cesser is elected." Respectfully submitted, 

J. W. Dickens, Chm. 

ioc? 9 ^ r> Re P° rt of committee to name persons to bring reports foil 
iyM. Report was adopted. 

Christian Education _ Hiram H. Wan 

Training Union w Directo 

Orph anag e R E M J 

State Missions j. w Crock J 

Sunday Schools Asso . Superintended 

Hospital Dr> c R gharp( 

Christian Literature M. C. Swicegooc 

r> uf * ? Asso - Presiden 

Public Morals E c Roa{ J 

Ministers Retirement . M. Hartmar 

American Bible Society . Harvey Clarl 

Home Missions _ Mrs> R> G j ennmg . 

Foreign Missions p. v< C ritchej 

Cnurch Music Carey Dav iJ 

State of the Churches _ W . V ann Carroll 

E. C. Roach, Chm. 

(30) Resolutions committee made report at this time. The report! 
was adopted. ] 

REPORT OF RESOLUTION COMMITTEE 

u Be ^ it: , Res 5 lv ed: That we, the messengers and visitors of the Onej 
Hundred and Eighteenth session of the Liberty Missionary Baptist!; 
Association do hereby express our deep appreciation by standing votel 
to the two churches which have so graciously entertained the Asso-i 
ciation this year Stoners Grove Baptist Church and Holloways Bap- 

a S l ' and to their nobIe Pastor Rev. C. C. Edinger. 

And that we of this body also ; extend our Christian love, sympathy! 
and gratitude to the officers of this association for their untiring! 
eliorts and faithful services. And we wish especially to thank all M 

a V J Slt t! ng s P eakers ' for their helpful and inspiring messages. 

And that we, of the Liberty Missionary Baptist Association lift our' 
hearts to God, in thanksgiving for His Blessings upon our work dur-l 
ing the past year. And that we shall face the new associational year! 
with renewed courage and faith in Christ our Lord, and cherish most! 
deeply our high and Holy calling, that, "We are labourers together! 
with God. 

Respectfully submitted, 

S. D. Baker, Chmn. 

u (3 i? Re P° rt on the Baptist Hospital was prepared and presented 
by Rev. Chas. F. Leek Pastor of First Church, Thomasville. The 
report was adopted then spoken to by Chaplin R. K. Young of the 
hospital. 



Minutes of the Liberty Baptist Association 



17 



REPORT ON N. C. BAPTIST HOSPITAL 

This is a sick world. It is sick in body, in mind, in heart, and in 
soul. . 

Jesus saw that and came as the Great Physician to the total being 
of man. And there is nothing more certain than that modern Christ- 
ians, especially Baptists, who boast of their Bible accuracy and hon- 
esty, in following Jesus today, must not only stay in the business of 
healing but expand in that field. 

In this connection, there is much about our Baptist Hospital to 
elicit our praise, stir our enthusiasm, and gain our concrete support. 

There is first its Bowman Gray School of Medicine. There is not 
a Baptist Christian viewing the situation sanely, who would prefer 
that the scores of young medical students in the Christian environ- 
ment and under the Christian influence of our Baptist Hospital be 
transferred to some secular school of medicine without even a sem- 
blance of Christian emphasis. 

There is also its School of Nursing. Over a period of 25 years it 
has graduated 447 nurses. Its present normal enrollment is 150. None 
of us needs to be reduced to the necessity of round-the-clock nursing 
to appreciate fully what our School of Nursing is doing for ailing 
humanity. 

There is likewise what we choose to call the Department of Free 
Service. Parenthetically, it should be said ' that not every Baptist, 
jnor every contributor to the Mother's Day offerings, should expect 
I free rooms, treatments, and examinations at the Baptist Hospital. 
I On the other hand, let us praise God that our Baptist Hospital, 
(through our Mother's Day offering, last year gave $128,900.00 worth 
of free service to needy sufferers, while various health and welfare 
agencies, the Duke Foundation, and certain individuals increased this 
free service to a total of $312,500.00, plus more than double that in 
free services by the doctors. Last year 9,700 patients were cared for 
in the hospital and 90,000 visits were made to its clinics and out- 
patient department. 

In this connection, it will further stir our gratitude to know that in 
1949 our Baptist Hospital gave $7,729.32 worth of partly or fully free 
service, plus fully free doctor's services, to 96 bed patients and 1,153 
who visited the Hospital from the territory of Our Association, 
whereas only a third of this, or $2,631.93, was provided by our Liberty 
Association's Mother's Day offering. However, our 1950 Mother's 
Day offering was $2,631.93 this year as compared with $2,402.40 in 
1949. 

The Hospital also reports that North Carolina Baptists will provide 
the $700,000.00 much needed South Wing, as promised in good faith 
by those of us attending the Special Charlotte Convention, provided 
each church does its part. 

Now, besides many other praiseworthy features in our Baptist Hos- 
pital program of applied Christianity, there is lastly a Department of 
Religion. Unless we unfairly expect more of our Baptist Hospital in 
the way of winning converts, and other on-the-spot visible results, 
than we do of the Sunday School, Training Union, Woman's Mis- 
sionary Union, "Board" of Deacons, Organized Classes, Brotherhoods, 
Weekly Prayer Meetings, and the like in the average Baptist Church, 
we shall likewise be very happy over the religious aims, plans, efforts, 
and achievements of our Baptist Hospital. 

This Department has a Director, Dr. W. K. McGee, for ten vears 
pastor of First Church, Thomasville ; a Chaplain, Dr. Richard K. 
Young, who is here to speak to this report; a Baptist student secre- 
tary; and a second Chaplain, recently made available through the 
generosity of a friend of the Hospital. 



18 



Minutes of the Liberty Baptist Association 



There are Sunday School classes for patients, visitors, and staff I 
classes for student nurses in Bible, Religious Education, and the; 
Christian Home; and classes in clinical pastoral training to help 
pastors become skillful in sick-room ministries. 

God's Word is preached in weekly vesper services, in which doctors, 
nurses, medical students, and others help. Young men and women 
in training are encouraged to enter medical mission fields. And much 
personal work designed to meet the needs of patient and staff mem- 
bers is an active program of our Hospital. 

Yes, there is so much at our Baptist Hospital to stir our praise and 
generosity that we have neither disposition nor time to criticise or 
curtail its great possibilities for the good of man and the glorifying 
of God. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Chas. F. Leek 

(32) Report on Christian literature was presented by Mr. Morse 
Grant Editor of Charity and Children, Mills Home, Thomasville, N. C. 

(33) Visitors recognized at this time were Miss Strickland of Mills 
Home and Rev. Walton of Rowan Association. 

(34) Hymn "What A Friend We Have In Jesus", followed by a 
special number by L. W. Hansel of Glennanna Church. Adjourned 
for the noon hour. Benediction by Rev. Hemphill of Morganton 
Church. 

Wednesday Afternoon 

Christ the answer in world missions. 

(35) Devotion was conducted by Rev. Clarence Jenkins of Oak Hill 
Memorial Church. Hymn used was "Must Jesus Bear the Cross 
Alone". 

(36) Report on Public Morals was prepared and presented by Rev. 
W. F. Gentry of Churchland Church. The report was adopted and 
then discussed by Rev. W. B. Cone, Pastor of Longhurst Baptist 
Church of Roxboro, N. C. 

PUBLIC MORALS 

As we gather in another associational meeting at a time when our 
young men are being called again to the colors and at a time when 
man has in his hand the power to completely annihilate cities and 
even nations in a few moments of time we should be impressed afresh 
and anew with the urgency of the fundamental responsibility of the 
church of Jesus Christ namely: to teach man to believe and trust in 
God as Father, to be a good steward of the resources of the Father's 
world, and to live within the social structure as a brother to all others. 
Surely we need only to look around in our own association, state and 
nation to see how great has been our failure just here. Time does not 
permit us to discuss, not even mention, all the evils in existence 



Minutes of the Liberty Baptist Association 



19 



today. Let us notice two or three of them. 

Gambling — Hugh A. Brimm, executive secretary of Social Service 
Commission of the S. B. C. reports "that crime conditions equal to 
the 1920's have recently been spotlighted all over the nation. Gambl- 
ing has mushroomed into a multi-billion dollar business and has 
thrown a network over our country reaching eager fingers into every 
possible opening." Recently Congress set up a crime investigating 
committee and immediately this committee knocked on the White 
House door for executive orders to go into governmental records. It 
believes that big time gambling needs the protection of politics like 
a duck needs water. And what has been uncovered in government 
circles is a national shame. Friends these and other gamblers are 
not born over night. Many of them are born even in our own public 
schools and churches when we teach our boys and girls to gamble 
with their pennies and nickles as money making schemes for these 
J institutions. Many other gambling practices are being carried on and 
participated in even by Christian people. For instance only in the 
last few days did Attorney General McMillan rule that "Jackpot" 
nights were a violation of lottery laws in N. C. 

j Marriages and Morals : The title of a recent book expresses a 
truth that Christian people must become more concerned about 

j namely: "Marriage is on Trial." There are a little better than 31 

j divorces for every 100 marriages today. Every year there are more 
than a million and a helf new cases of veneral disease in America. 

I Prostitution was suppressed somewhat during the recent war by close 
cooperation between local and Federal law enforcement officers. But 
recently there has been a rapid revival of this degrading traffic in 
human souls. 

Beverage Alcohol: We are told that 75% of adult men and 55% of 
adult women drink either occasionally or regularly in America today. 
You have some idea what this means in cost, consumption, crime and 
death. And the methods used by the manufacturers to advertise their 
ware and get it before the eye of the public are absolutely shocking 
and almost unbelieveable to the Christian. 

There are many other evils that could be mentioned such as race 
hatred and Sabbath desecration etc. but permit one word concerning 
the only adequate cure. Flere we come back to what we said in the 
beginning that the first step in finding a cure for all these evils is to 
get men saved then teach them to live the Christian life by loving 
God supremely and their fellowmen as they love themselves. 

Respectfully submitted, 
W. F. Gentry 



20 



Minutes Of the Liberty Baptist Association 



(37) Report on Ministers retirement was prepared and presented 
by Rev. C. M. Pegram Pastor of Reed Street Church. Report was 
adopted and then discussed by Brother Pegram. 

HIGH COST OF LIVING 

The high cost of living was reflected again in the work of this 
department during 1948 in that more requests for increases and emer-j 
gency checks were received than in any past year. Sixty-seven in- 
creases were granted, and twenty-three emergencj' checks were issued! 
to relieve beneficiaries in distress. Many have found that the small 
amounts that they had been receiving were altogether inadequate to 
meet their needs. So far, a small increase has been made for every 
request that was thought worthy ; but, unless the churches in larger 
numbers respond to the recommendation of the Southern Baptist Con- 
vention as listed in the Calendar of Denominational Activities for the 
month of April and take "an offering for the relief of aged ministers,"! 
we will be unable to grant more increases or place any new names' 
on our roll. 

There is no group to whom Southern Baptist owe so much as thosej 
who laid the foundation of our denomination. Becoming pride and 
commendalbe modesty cause these old people to conceal their poverty, 
and many of them suffer in silence. 

We request your prayerful interest and support as we minister to 
this most worthy group who served before there was any Relief and 
Annuity Board and never had the opportunity of providing, with the 
help of their denomination, an annuity , upon reaching the age of re- 
tirement. Their labors in past years made great our denomination, 
and our debt to them is large and can never be paid. 

Many of our churches for years have taken a fellowship offering 
for the relief department of our Board. There is desperate need that 
more of the churches of our Southland follow the Calendar of De- 
nominational Activities and take a fellowship offering during April. 
Nearly eighteen persons— preachers, their wives, or widows of preach- 
ers—look to the relief department of the Relief and Annuity Board 
for the major part of their livelihood. Before living costs sky-rocket- 
ed to their present scale the amounts they received were more or less 
ample to provide the necessities of life, but now many of these find 
themselves in distress because of the small purchasing power of the 
dollar. 

While you give your millions for the needy in China and Europe, 
will you not assist those who have preached unto you the words of 
life, baptized and married you and your children, and spoken words I 
of comfort in hours of grief, lest you hear the caustic words of our 
Saviour, "As oft as ye did it not unto these, ye did it not unto me"? 
Each church will be blessed by observing this fellowship offering, and 
these soldiers of the Cross will be given that which Southern Baptists 



Minutes of the Liberty Baptist Ass ociation 21 

)we them, a modest living in the evening of life, as they await "the 
)ne clear call" to enter their heavenly home. 

We recommend that all the churches of the Association enroll in 
his work at once for their own protection and the best interest of 
heir pastors. 

We urge the pastors to become members of the Age Annuity Plan 
vithout delay thus providing security that you may need at any time 
or yourselves and families. 

C. M. Pegram 

(38) Report of American Bible Society was prepared and presented 
>y Miss Sallie McCrackin of Mills Home Church. Report was adopted. 

REPORT ON AMERICAN BIBLE SOCIETY 

When the American Bible Society was established in 1816 its found- 
:rs had one commission and one charge, that was : "To encourage a 
pder circulation of the Holy Scriptures without note or comment." 
Wing the 134 years of its existence the Society has stuck to this 
jim program. It has distributed 400 million copies. 

Bibles are distributed by every means of conveyance. Many col- 
orteurs distribute Scriptures on foot in areas that cannot be reached 
therwise. During 1949 the distribution amounted to more than 9 
fiillion copies. The Society has kept up its service to the men in 
liiform. 

| Japan is considered the greatest opportunity. The Society has 
rinted and shipped to Japan about 3 million volumes. A Chaplain 
F the U. S. Army, after a tour of Japan said : "The people are avid 
leaders ; on trains and at stations one sees them with Testaments or 
[ospels in hand reading." 

A plan is now on foot to present to the Japanese a signature book 
pntaining names of those who have helped provide Bibles for Japan, 
jbis is called a "Good Will Book" and will tell the Japanese in a dra- 
stic way how the American people want the Japanese people to 
low their Christ. 

Scriptures are being shipped to many nations, though nothing is 
fing shipped just now to Russia. However, a supply of Russian 
triptures lies waiting in New York ready for shipment the moment 
e time is ripe. Many volumes were distributed in Korea last year. 
We would recommend that every Sunday School in our association 
serve Universal Bible Sunday on December 10, or some Sunday near 
at date, and make a liberal offering for the work of the American 
Me Society. 

\gain I will remind you that my faith in the American Bible So- 



22 



Minutes of the Liberty Baptist Association 



ciety is founded on Isaih 55:11: 

So shall my word be that goeth forth out of my moutn ; it shall 
not return unto me void, but it shall accomplish that which I please, 
and it shall prosper in the thing whereto I sent it. 

'Sallie L. McCracken 

(39) Miscellaneous Business 

Committee on time, place and preacher reported at this time 
The report was adopted. 

Report on Time, Place and Preacher. 

Your committe wishes to recommend the following: 

1. That the time of the 1951 meeting of the Liberty Baptist Associa- 
tion be Tuesday and Wednesday after the fourth Sunday in September. 

2. That the place of meeting be the Greenwood Baptist Church on the 
first day and the Rich Fork Baptist Church on the second day. 

3. That the annual sermon be preached by the pastor who is the senioi; 
pastor in our Association in point of service — Rev. C. C. Edinger, pastoi 
of Holloways, Jersey, and Stoners Grove Baptist Churches, and the alter 
nate to preach the sermon be Rev. J. W. Dickens, pastor of Center Hil 
and Smith Grove Baptist Churches. 

0. V/. Rhodenhiser, Chm. 

(40) Committee on finance reported at this time. 

Your Finance Committee suggests that the recommendations madj 
last year be stressed and carried out by each church in the Asso 
ciation. 

We are glad to announce the adding machine for which $41.00 wa 
raised last year was purchased for $50.00 and has been a great hd| 
to our Treasurer. 

Report of Finances for 1950 Associationai Mission Campaign 

1. Abbotts Creek 

2. Center Hill ... 

3. Smith Grove 

4. Churchland 

5. Denton 

6. Mt. View 

7. Hollaways 

8. Jersey 

9. Stoners Grove 

10. High Rock ... 

11. Lake View ... 



.$ 71.2 
45.0 
25.0 
60.0 i 

20.7 
38.8 
45.0 
35.0 
14.6 
20.0 



Minutes of the Liberty Baptist Association 



23 



2. Erlanger.:.. 68.00 

3. Lexington 1st 160.00 

4. Sheets Memorial 115.20 

5. Liberty 37.11 

6. New Friendship 67.40 

7. Reeds.... 60.00 

3. Thomasville 1st 100.00 

Carolina Ave 50.00 

3. Glennanna 25.00 

1. Greenwood .. 60.00 

I. Mills Home 50.00 

3. Reid Street 36.00 

!-. South Side 30.00 

5. Union Grove 23.10 

S. Wallburg 40.00 

7. Welcome 34.00 

aid in by churches participating $1,384.07 



laid to Missionaries 816.60 

kid to March Hotel 103.60 

[kid to New Lexington Hotel 400.17 

ashing Checks , .70 

iift to Associational Missionary the $63. 

1 Balance ....... 63.00 

Total paid out $1,384.07 



(41) Report on Home Missions was prepared and presented by 
rs. C. C. Wall of Lexington First Church. Report was adopted. 

REPORT ON HOME MISSIONS 

During last year 1,030 workers were in the service of our Home 
ssion Board. 251 of these were student workers. This great force 
Ported 35,913 conversions; 1,817 revivals conducted; 577 new missions 
jpned; 165 new churches constituted; 50 new buildings completed 
1 under construction. Baptist Chaplains reported 4,893 professions. 
Iports of the evangelistic crusade led by our Home Mission per- 
■taiel gave 7,780 baptisms and 11,875 additions to churches not count- 
an inestimable number of conversions resulting from mission radio 
igrams. 

'he Home Board's work is organized around the following depart- 
hts : Direct missions, Co-operative missions, Evangelism, Jewish 
fk, Chaplains, Church Building and Loan Fund, Migrant work; 
dent Summer Mission Program, Education and Publicity General 
Id workers and Negro work. 

he Home Missions Board is now at work in 23 states, in Cuba, 



24 



Minutes of the Liberty Baptist Association 



Canal Zone, Panama, Alaska and the District of Columbia. In thl 
states, work is carried on among the Indians, Spanish-Mexican. Frencr.j 
Italian, Cuban, Chinese and Japanese people. 

Baptist work was started in Alaska by armed forces, Baptist Chip 
lains, and others in the area. Help was given by the Board in 194^1 
$60,000.00 was appropriated to build churches. A Youth Center i 
needed near the University of Alaska and ten additional workers. 

There are 42 city mission programs in operation in the Southeri 
Convention. This work reaches people who do not attend regula| 
services held in church buildings. 

The Rural Church Program has shown increased interest and proi 
gress during the past year. 

The Western Mission Program has had it's best and most effectivj 
year of work. The Kansas and Oregon Conventions were added n 
1950. This gives us five Western States. 

The Mountain Mission Program adopts the county unit system b; 
having strong Baptist work in every county seat from which the bad 
country is reached. 

Home Mission Board's work for the Negros is centered in trainin; 1 
of Negro pastors in the Seminaries and Colleges of the Negro Con 
ventions. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Mrs. Carroll C. Wall 

(42) A motion was made by Rev. M. C. Swiccgood pastor of Reed 1 
Church and seconded by Rev. C. M. Pegram Pastor of Reed Stree- 
Church that the Association buy a projector to be used by the Assoj 
ciational Missionary, Rev. Van Carroll in promoting the Sunday Schoc 
work of the Association. Collection was taken and $24.30 was re; 
ceived for the same. t 

(43) Obituaries See pspe 32. [ 

(44) The closing message of the Liberty Baptist Association wa 
delivered bv Rev. L. B. Reavis, Pastor of Green St. Church, Hig' 
Point, N. C. Benediction by Rev. L. B. Reavis. A_djourned to mee 
with Greenwood Baptist Church, Thomasville, September 25 and wit 
Rich Fork Church the 26th. 

Rev. J. O. Walton, Moderator 
A. L. Snider, Clerk 



MILLS HOME BAPTIST CHURCH 
(List of Officers received too late for statistical tables) 

Pastor J. O. Walton 

Youth Director Mrs. B. F. Strickland 

Treasurer __.Miss Sallie McCracken 

Clerk Mrs. Mary B. Davis 

Organist Mrs. J. O. Walton 

Choir Director Miss Lucille Reed 

S. S. Supt. R. E. Muth 

B. T. U. Director Miss Lucille Reed 

W. M. U. President Mrs. Polly Teath 



Minutes of the Liberty Baptist Association 



25 



Minutes of Woman's Missionary Union 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



I The Womans Missionary Union of Liberty Association met for its 44th 
nnual Session with Greenwood Baptist Church, Thomasville, April 21, 
j&50, with Mrs. P. M. Hendricks, Superintendent, presiding. Mrs. Hen- 
|icks used as her theme, "Abounding in the Work of the Lord." 
! The session opened with the group singing "Christ for the World we 
jng," which was the hymn for the year. The Watchword were given in 
juson. 

I The morning devotions were conducted by Mrs. J. Roy Clifford, First 
[[lurch, Lexington. Special music by Mills Home Quartet. Prayer by 
Irs. Paul Kesler. 

I Greetings were given by Mrs. David Oldham and the response by Mrs. 
ilodrow Yates. 

I At this time a number of visitors were recognized and welcomed. Also 
ointment of committees, and representatives of Societies recognized. 
Roll call, 23 churches represented Attendance, 136. Miss Provence 
>gnized four A-l Societies: Mills Home, Rich Fork, Denton and Erlanger. 
ft R. A. reports were given by Mr. Marse Grant, and he announced R. 
^ meeting to be June 22 at Mills Home 

f(l Miss Provence spoke briefly on the Cooperative Program and 25th 
Ijjniversary as well as the Summer Camp schedule, 
i Miss Lydia Green gave an inspirational talk on her work with|little 
• Idren in Canton, China. She warned us by illustrations of the dread of 
Cmmunism. 

sj Time and Place committee announced Center Hill will be our next 
•pting place. 



26 MINUTES O" TKF. LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSO CIATION 

LIBERTY WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 
Annual Report of Superintendent 
The theme for 1949, "That the World May Know presented tc 
Our theme this year "Abounding in the Work of the Lord is a con- 
tinuation of that challenge. How well will we continue to meet ■ 
Our story for 1949 has been told. Actual figures will tell part ot it 
Our hearts, minds, and convictions will tell the Pf ^^ow" only ft » 
us personally. The lives we touched and influenced wi tell the restf 
Were we worthy "Laborers together with God?" Will we coming 
"Abounding in the Work of the Lord" so "That the World May Knov; 
Him" truly through our living? 

ASSOCIATIONAL STANDARD OF EXCELLENCE 
As an association we did not attain the Standard of Excellence J: 
However, there was an improvement over 1948, in that we missed onb 
two points in 1949, compared with four in 1948, We failed m a ne 
increase of ten per cent in number of organizations, and paymen 
of financial apportionment for the year." 

Standard of Excellence— Local Societies 
A-l Societies 

W M S. Churchland Mills Home 

Denton Erlanger, Jr. SUNBEAMS 

Erlanger Erlanger, Int. (Fleming) 

Mills Home Lexington, 1st. Jr. ^rl<inger 

Rich Fork New Friendship, Jr. Mills Home 

Y V/ A Jersey, Int. (Carter Morgan) 

Erlanp-er Sheets Memorial Lexington 1st 

New Friendship R. A. Mills Home 

q A Erlanger, Jr. (Vivian Normell) 

A hhof t r Oree^-" Tt 

" MISSION STUDY AND LITERATURE 
Through good books and good magazines W. M. S. # members an 
Youn^ People may keep well informed on current mission news, bot 
homeland foreign. In addition, past history of missions may b 
studied— Above ail, our Mission study books and magazines otter 
variety of wholesome stories and reading matter, informative and in 

^Special mention is made here of societies with 100% membershi 
re3dmp- one or more missionary books. 
W M S (Vallie Pasre) (Tudson) 

Erlanger (Naomi Shell) (Livingston) 

Lexington 1st (Lockett) £ llleS K e) 

I ibertv Lexington '1st, Jr. (Powell) 

WallbuTg Denton, Jr. SUNBEAMS 

G A R- A. Mills Home 

Mills' Home Mills Home (Fleming) 

Liberty had the following fully graded Unions for 1949: 
Abbotts Creek Erlanger Reid Street 

Churchland Mills Home Thomasville 1st 

Denton New Friendship Union Grove 

Special mention is made of Erlanger which is one of the eleve 
fully graded unions in North Carolina for 1949. 
y 8 SPECIAL ANNUAL EVENTS 

January— Leadership Conference 
April— Executive Committee Meeting 

General Associational V/. M. U. Meeting . 
June— Executive Committee Meeting 
july—jr., G. A., R. A. Camp one day 
Sept.— Executive Committee Meeting 
Nov.— Mission Study— Community Missions Institute 
Dec— Executive Committee Meeting and Luncheon 



Minutes of the Liberty Baptist Association 



27 



COMPLETE FINANCIAL REPORT 

1st Qtr. 2nd Qtr. 3rd Qtr. 4th Qtr. 



3-operative W. M. S $2,017.76 $2,041.12 $1,790.86 $2,053.72 

o-operative Y. P 419.30 421.82 413.03 448.23 

pedal W. M. S 851.33 1,285.06 1,125.74 2,508.04 

serial Y. P 206.00 155.64 159.12 371.62 

btals $3,494.39 $3,903.64 $3,488.75 $5,381.61 



Gifts 1948 Women and Young People $16,003.64 
Gifts 1949 Women and Young People $16,268.39 _ 

Note : An error in last year's report read $18,003.95. It should have 

ad $16,003.64. This may conflict with the final tabulation in the 

aleigh Office, but please bear in mind that occasionally reports 

ach you that do not reach us. 

GLIMPSES AT FIRST QUARTER 1950 (W. M. S. Only) 

11 W. M. S. reporting — 

1 M. S. Membership— 1,057 

D-operative Goal 1950— $7,962.10 

Dntributed 1st quarter— $2,258.22 

CONTRIBUTIONS THROUGH SPECIAL OFFERINGS: 



nnie W. Armstrong $ 958.58 

[iban Missions 30.00 

Dreign Missions Support 71.50 

bme Mission Support 29.50 

rorld Relief 46.89 

kal Gifts W. M. S $3,394.69 



[Note: For explanation concerning our gifts, please read and study 
|iges 29-36 in the North Carolina 1950 Guide Book. 
KL1 phases of work show improvement this first quarter. Each 
feairman will touch her special phase. 

PLANNING CONFERENCE 
Despite bad weather, our planning conference proved successful, 
ills Home Society members were gracious hostesses. Mrs. Craver, 
ate Community Missions chairman endeared herself to each person. 
> my Associational Officers, "Thank you" as you successfully led 
ur conferences and "Thank you" for splendid co-operation this past 
ar. To each Local Officer, I repeat my appreciation. 

POINTS TO STRESS 
Reports to Superintendent by 5th of month following close of 
; quarter. 

\ Feel free to call on Associate Superintendent for help in organi- 
zation of new societies. 

That we accept financial apportionment and strive to pay it. 

That we work earnestly in the Mission Study, Stewardship and 
j Community Missions, phases of our program, realizing that study, 
ijj faithful stewardship, and soul-winning are vital parts of W. M. U. 
1 work. 

I That we realize that there is given to us a great responsibility as 
we strive to foster our Young People in their organizations, and 
S to promote their Christian education through our Training Schools. 
! "Laborers together with God". What a privilege ! To each of you, 
I may we continue "Abounding in the work of the Lord" claiming 
I the promise "Lo, I am with you always." 

Respectfully submitted, 
Mrs. P. M. Hedricks, Supt. 
1949 Community Missions Report for Liberty Association 
.s we come to the close of another year, we lift our hearts in deep- 
gratitude to our heavenly Father for the opportunities of service 
ting the past year. The first impulse of my heart is to thank each 



28 



Minutes of the Liberty Baptist Association 



one of you who had a part in making 1949 one of the best years 
Community Missions Work. Yet, as we compare the various phas 
of work included in Community Missions, we should not be satisfi 
with our record for in many respects we have failed Him. Our su 
cesses should challenge us to greater effort and a more complete cot 
mitment of our glorious task of making our Communities Christiat 

I want to share with you some visible signs of growth in Coi 
munity Missions — namely: — More societies and Young People's orgat 
zations sent in reports on time and filled out more accurately in 19 
than any previous year; The W. M. S., which numbers 28, were 100 
in sending reports this quarter; An increase in members engaged 
Community Missions work; and Most Important, an increase of tho 
making definite efforts in Soul Winning. (Mrs. D. H. Craver 
Boonville, State Community Missions Chairman, sent congratulatiof 
to 17 Associations in the State for having a perfect reporting reco 
for the previous year, and I am happy to report Liberty Associate 
was one of these to receive this honor. 

Our Association voted as a project the past year, the giving 
$100.00 to a worthy student in school to help on expenses. This w 
given to Miss Evelyn Smith of Reeds Baptist Church, who is < 
school at Gardener Webb College, Boiling Springs. 

Another interesting feature of the year, we have had more Institu 
held for leadership training, with capable teachers for each class. T 
attendance in thesie meetings has been most gratifying. 

We are deeply grateful to our Associational Missionary, Rev. Vai 
Carrol, for being instrumental in having Mission Emphasis Week | 
our Association. Also for the helpful information and inspiring mc 
sages brought by our Missionaries, which we trust will strength) 
Community Missions work. 

Our aim for the ensuing year is : 

1. Continue to emphasize Soul Winning; 2. Lead every membj 
of each organization in Community Missions each month in some (3 
finite work; 3. Co-operate in plans to meet the needs of Associatio 
4. Each Society foster and give special attention to its Young Peopl 
work ; 5. Help plan activities for our Young People relating to 
phases of work. 

Let us keep before us our goal for 1950. Every member of eve 
organization in this Association engaged in Community Missions, a 
every unsaved person in every community contacted for Christ — a 
pray and work to that end. 

Respectfullv submitted, 
Mrs. R. L. Palmer 
Mission Study Report for Associational Meeting 
April 21, 1950 

In giving my first Mission Study report, I am happy to report thi 
was notable progress in every phase of our Mission Study Progran 

Your reports showed we had in 1949, 189 Mission Study classes, tl 
represented a gain over 1948 of 35 classes in W. M. S. and You 
People's Organizations, with 2,398 enrolled, a gain of 374 over 15 
enrollment. 

In Missionary reading our Woman's Missionary Societies and You 
People more than doubled in reading one or more recommended M? 
Nonary books. 

Five of our churches reported having two or more • Mission Stu 
classes in W. M. S. and each Young People's Organizations. I ho 
each of our churches will do that well this year. 

We feel sure the 14 churches represented at our Mission Stu 
Institute received a blessing from that good day. 

There is a slight change in our Mission Study report blanks, 
would like to call your attention to at this time. 



Minutes of the Liberty Baptist Association 



29 



In thinking of our trend so far in 1950 our first quarters report 
lows a slight gain over the first quarter last year. However, our 
;eds within our Association are many. I am sorry to report there 
ere about 6 of our churches who did not have a single Mission 
:udy Class last year. How are we going to get our information if 
e fail to read our Mission Study books? There were several of our 
lurches who had one or two classes in their W. M. S. and not any 
the Junior Organizations. How are we to awaken the interest of 
ir boys and girls? How are they going to understand the different 
ces and nations? How are our young people going to know unless 
2 take enough interest in them to buy their books and see they 
ive a good teacher, and a way provided for them to attend their 
isses ? 

We will be having another Mission Study Institute this fall— the 
irpose to train teachers who will teach the women and young 
ople in their churches. Be sure to send someone for each organi- 
tion who will go back to their respective churches and teach a 
ission Study Class. 

Pur Mission Study goals for the Association are — 

1. A Mission Study class in at least three-fourths of each of the 
W. M. U. organizations in the Association. 

2. A minimum of five churches in which every member of every 
approved Missionary book during the year. 

i 3. An Association Mission Study Institute. 

^Ve did not reach this (2) point last year "that 5 churches in which 

jbry member except the Sunbeams read one approved book." 

I am deeply grateful to our local Mission Study Chairmen for their 

jendid co-operation and help and prompt replies to my cards and 

jters. 

May we hear again the challenge given to North Carolina women 
Mrs. Wesley N. Jones. She said, 

"We must inform ourselves. Our people must be informed, for 
when we know, we pray, when we pray we give, when we give 
we go." 

Mrs. S. O. Hinkle, 
Chairman 

Report of Committee on Resolutions 

hereas, we are grateful for the blessings showered upon us, there- 
lie, be it resolved : 

I That we thank the Heavenly Father for His great love and care. 
| That we thank the Greenwood Baptist Church, it's pastor and 
I every society in the Association who had a part in making this a 

happy and inspiring day. 
I That we express to Miss Green and Miss Province our gratitude 

i for their stirring messages. 

I That we express our sincere appreciation to our dear president, 
[Mrs. Hendricks and every officer in this Association for their 
I faithful and efficient leadership during the entire year. 

i That we pray earnestly that every W. M. U. Member will re- 

ii dedicate her life to His service. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mrs. Chas. F. Leek, Chairman 

Report Associational Stewardship Chairman 

jpd works by a plan. There was a plan of creation. The physical 
perse is run by a dependable plan. Christ died to make effection 
Iplan of salvation. He has a plan by which his program is to be 
iinced and sustained. The redeemed are to give first themselves 
ithen a worthy portion of their substance that the gospel may be 
lb to every creature. 



V 



30 Ml 



N UTES OF THE LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



In God's plan giving always was to be in proportion to the income:! 
In 1 Cor. 16 2 we read-<<Upon the first day of the week let every 
one of you lay by him in store as God has prospered him, that there 

"^haftGoTs InScLTanP On the basis of the study of the 
Word we conclude that His plan is the tithe The tithe : should ffl 
adopted by all Christians as the minimum of ^Jaro^a th^ 
church. As I looked over the reports for last year I noticed that JM 
had 420 tithers in our Association Of this number only 86 jer n 
ones. This is only an average of 17 per W M S This <J uarter ^, 
have already, 60 new tithers reported and a total for the quarter 

Let's keep Y our goals before us this year and try to reach th| 
financially not leaving out the fact that we must be stewards of oui 
time, talent and personality as well as possessions. 

Please emphasize Stewardship night m your church. There are s 
many ways we can plan programs that will inform us and kee befqj 
us the fact that God expects each one of us to be \ faithfu * ^wa r £ 

May I leave this verse in your hearts as we continue working I: 

^'Therefore my beloved brethern, Be ye steadfast, unmoveabl<j 
always abounding in the work of the Lord, for as much as ye knfl 
that your labor is not in vain in the Lord 1 Lor. li>:58. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Mrs. J. O. Walton, Chairman 

Departed Members by Mrs. J. B. Powell 

"Let not your heart be troubled; Ye believe in God, believe als. 
in me In my Father's House are many mansions : if it were not sc 
I would have told you. I go to prepare a place for you and it l I 
to prepare a place for you, I will come again and receive you urn 
myself; that where I am, there ye may be also. - John 14 : I-J. 

Today we pause to pay tribute to those from our W M U of th 
Liberty Association, who have answered the final call of the Maste 
and have gone to enjov living in their mansion m Heaven We ar 
grateful to God for their Christian lives and influences which counte 
for so much in our W. M. U. work, and humbly bow m submissio 

t0 OvS r S home goers who have answered the roll call since our la< 
meeting are as follows : 

Carolina Avenue .. .. - - Mrs. _ Nell Brewer 

Frlan^er .... Mrs. Nannie I. M?unev 

*' rlange " Mrs. J. F. Gurley 

Thomasville First Mrs. Jessie Bryant Kennedy 

y ersev Mrs. Ira bharpe 

Stoners" Grove " ----- - - , Mrs H T Penry 

Sheets Memorial Mrs. J. M. Johnson 

Churchland Mrs. Mary Lamb 

Not now, but in the coming years, 

It may be in the better land, 

We'll read the meaning of our tears, 

And there, sometime, we'll understand. 

We'll catch the broken thread again, 

And finish what we here began; 

Heave'n will the mysteries explain, 

And then, ah, then we'll understand. 

We'll know why clouds instead of sun 

Were over many a cherished plan; 

Why song has ceased when scarce began ; 

Tis there, sometime, we'll understand. 

Mrs. J. B. Powell 



Minutes of the Liberty Baptist Association 



31 



Irs. Hendricks, President announced the 1951 Nominating Corn- 
tee as follows : 

Mrs. G. C. Lewis, Chairman 

Mrs. Ben Carroll 

Mrs. Graham Barnes 

Mrs. W. N. Parker 

Mrs. C. A. Smith 

Irs. C. C. Eddinger presiding at this time announced the list of 
cers the committee wished to present for election to serve for 1950. 
• report being accepted the following were elected to serve for the 
uing year: 

Supt Mrs. P. M. Hendricks 

Associate Supt Mrs. Paul Kesler 

Secretary and Treas Mrs. T. T. Jackson 

Young Peoples Director . Miss Helen Tate 

Royal Ambassador 

Counselor Rev. W. F. Gentry 

Community Missions 

Chairman Miss Sarah Penninger 

Stewardship 

I Chairman Mrs. J. O. Walton 

Mission Study 

I Chairman Mrs. S. O. Hinkle 

Literature 

Chairman Mrs. W. F. Gentry 

Margaret Fund and 
Training School 

Chairman Mrs. W. Van Carroll 

le installation service was most impressive and the Dedicatory 
rer given by Miss Provence. 

le Divisional Superintendent, Mrs. Stafford Webb spoke for a 
using as her subject "Your Labor Is Not in Vain in the Lord", 
h was very interesting as well as challenging, 
ter the closing hymn Rev. W. F. Gentry closed the meeting with 
er. 

W. M. U. TREASURER'S REPORT 

ipts for 1949 $221.64 

Balance : 57.46 

Disbursements for 1949 

April Miss Irene Chambers $ 10.00 

Mrs. Tohn Wacaster 3.00 

Mrs. P. M. Hendricks 10.59 

May Burney Fund 15.00 

June Green Printing Co 11.90 

Secretary Supplies 1.50 

Elizabeth Hayworth _ 1.03 

Sept. Divisional Expenses 7.50 

Oct. Rev. W. F. Gentry 15.55 

Miss Helen Tate 25.00 

' Dec. Mrs. Van Carroll 100.00 

Mrs. S. O. Hinkle 10.00 

Mrs. P. M. Hendricks 10.00 

Jan. Mrs. P. M. Hendricks 7.95 

Mrs. H. D. Craver _ 5.00 

Total 234.02 

ce $44.98 



OUR HOME GOERS 



Who have answered the Roll Call since last meeting. 

Abbotts Creek— Mrs. Rosa Charles, Mr. C. H. Bodenheimer, 

Mr. P. D. Hedgecock, Mr. C. C. Bodenheimer. 
Center Hill — Mr. George W. McCarn 

Churchland— Mrs. M. L. Teague, Mr. John Wilson, Mr. B. E. 

Simerson, Mrs. T. L. Honberrier, Mrs. H. D. Lamb. 
Denton First — Deacon Floyd Coggins, Mrs. W. R. Snider, 

Mrs. Alex Garner, Mr. M. C. Newsom. 
Floyd — Mrs. Sarrah Owen. 
Holloways— Mr. H. L. Cody 
High Rock — None Reported. 

Jersey — Deacon J. D. Palmer, Mrs. I. A. Jharp, Mrs. Julia 
Long. 

Lake View — Deacon R. L. Young. 

Lexington First— Mrs. R. V. Long, Mr. W. H. Collins, Rev. 
M. L. Matthews, Mr. Robert Grubb, Mr. J. H. Penninger, 
Mrs. R. J. Tate, Mrs. W. B. Hunt, Mrs. W. I. Mabry, 
Mr. L. T. Fry. 

Erlanger — Deacon Paul Solomon, Mrs. J. F. Gurley, Mrs. 
Walter Edwards, Mr. Ed Lumsden. 

Sheets Memorial— Mr. H. H. Wallace, Mr. Odell Michael, 
Mrs. J. M. Johnson, Mr. J. Loyd Maley (Charter mem- 
ber). 

Lick Creek— Mr. W. L. D. Surratt. 

Liberty — Mr. Marvin Hicks, Mrs. Frances Hunt Sullivan. 
Mountain View — None Reported. 

New Friendship — Mrs. Mamie Snyder, Mrs. Anna Jones, Mrs. 

Glenna Crowder, Mr. Franklin Snyder. 
Oak Hill — None Reported. 
Pleasant Pl? ; ~>s — None Reported. 

Reeds— Mr. \f. L. Craver, Mrs. Melinda Mize, Mrs. W. W. 
Myers. 

Rich Fork— L^rs. Minnie Sink, Mr. Charlie Hedrick. 
Smith Giuve- Deacon W. H. Smith. 

Stoners Grove — Mrs. H. ^ Penry, Sr., Mr. A. L. Styers. 
Summerville — Mrs. Belle avis, Mrs. Dallas Snider, 
Mrs. Cora Bean, Mrs. Nannie Doby. 
Taylors Grove — None Reported. 

Thomasville First — Mrs. H. S. Leonard, Mr. D. G. Floyd, 
Mrs. EdNifong, Mr. A. M. Bra}', Mrs. R. G. Kennedy, Mrs. 
Mattie Hedrick, Mrs. John Hoffman, Mrs. J. Boone Peace. 
Carolina Ave. — Mrs. Nell Russell Brewer. 
Glennanna — None Reported. 
Greenwood — None Reported. 
Mills Home — None Reported. 
Reid Street— Mr. J. O. Kemp. 
South Side — None Reported. 

Union Grove — Mr. Lacy Miller, Mr. I. T. Berrier. 
Wallburg— Mrs. Flora Bell Stone. 
Walters Grove — Mr. Ben Parrish. 

Welcome— Mr. W. K. Lanier, Mr. G. C. Hinkle, (Trustee). 







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Minutes of the Liberty Baptist Association 



HISTORICAL TABLE OF THE ASSOCIATION 

ERA WHERE HELD PREACHER MODERATOR CLERK 

?32...1 Jamestown George W. Purefoy Wm. Burch Peter Owen 

S3 Holloways Josiah Williams Eli Carroll Peter Owen 

?34 Abbotts Creek Eli Carroll Eli Carroll Peter Owen 

i36 Liberty John Colpepper Eli Carroll Peter Owen 

36 Jersey Eli Carroll Eli Carroll Peter Owen 

37 Lick Creek Peter Owen Eli Carroll Peter Owen 

m Abbotts Creek Benjamin Lani»r Eli Carroll Peter Pwen 

539.. .2 Pine Meeting H. ...Eli Carroll Eli Carroll Peter Owen 

liO Holloways Josiah Wiseman Eli Carroll Peter Pwen 

141 New Friendship Benjamin Lanier Gershom Tuessey Peter Owen 

42 Reeds X Poada Barton Roby Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

43 Lick Creek Benjamin Lanier Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

44 Abbotts Creek Wm. Turner Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

46 Jersey Alfred Renney Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

46 Lick Creek Wm. Turner Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

47 Abbotts Greek Wm. Turner Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

48 Reeds X Roads Benjamin Lanier Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

49. ..3 Big Creek Azariah Williams Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

50.. .1 Jamestown Benjamin Lanier Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

51 Liberity Wm. Turner Wm. Turner Azariah Williams 

63 Holloways Z. Minor Wm. Turner Azariah Williams 

E3 Abbotts Creek Benjamin Lanier Bedjamin Panier Azriah Wilisams 

p4 Reeds Y Roads Alfred Renny Josiah Spurgeon Azariah Williams 

65 Lick Creek Benjomin Lanier Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

56 Abbotts Creek (Unknown) Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

£57 Reeds X Roads Wm. Lambeth Amos Weaver Azariah Williams 

58 Holloways Amos Weaver Amos Weaver Azariah WilliainB 

59 New Friendship Benjamin Lanier Benjamin Lanier J. H. Owen 

50 Abbotts Creek ......Wm. Turner Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

31 Jersey J. B. Jackson J. B. Jackson Azariah Williams 

52 Lick Creek F. H. Jones J. B> Jackson Azariah Williams 

53 Abbotts Creek T. W, Tobey J. B. Jackson Azariah Williams 

54 Thomasville W. H. Hammer Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

55 (No Session Held On Account of Conditions coused By Cival War) 

56 Lick Creek W. T. Waters Benjamin Lanier J. H. Owen 

17 Abbotts Creek Benjamin Lanier Benjamin Lanier J. H. Owen 

8 Jersey W. H. Hammer Benjamin Lanier J. H. Owen 

9 Abbotts Creek A. P. Stokes Wm. Turner J. H. Owen 

0...3 Big Creek Wm. Turner Wm. Turner J. H. Owen 

1...2 Pine Meeting H. ...W. H. Wingate Wm. Turner J. H. Owen 

'2 New Friendship H. Morton J. E. Brooks J. L. Pleasant 

..Holloways Thomas Carrick H. Morton Thomas Carrick 

4 Lick Creek A. F. Reed Wm. Turner ....Thomas Carrick 

4 Muddy Creek C. T. Bailey Wm. Turner Thomas Carrick 

6. Reeds X Roads H. W. Reinhart Wm. Tnrner Thomas Carrick 

7 High Point J. B. Richardson Wm. Turneo Henry Sheets 

8.. .3 Big Creek H. W. Reinhart H. W. Reinhart Henry Sheeta 

..Liberty Harvey Hatcher H. W. Reinhart Henry Sheets 

Holloways S. F. Conrad H. W. Reinhart Henry Sheets 

il Jersey Henry Sheets H. W. Reinhart Henry Sheets 

4 Muddy Creek S. H. Thompson H. W. Reinhart Henry Sheets 

J...2 Pine Meeting H. ...O. F. Gregory... H. W. Reinhart Henry Sheets 

..Summerville S. H. Thompson Wm. Turner Henry Sheets 

5 Lexington J. B. Richardson Wm. Turner Henry Sheets 

..Abbotts Creek J. B. Richardson Wm. Turner Henry Sheets 

1 Lick Creek Henry Sheets James Smith Henry Sheets 

\ Reeds X Roads C. Durham Wm. Turner Henry Sheets 

New Friendship W. F. Watson James Smith Henry Sheets 

Jersey J.M.Bennett James Smith Henry Sheets 

...2 Pine Meeting H. ...J. K. Fant James Smith Henry Steets 



Minutes of the Liberty Baptist Association 



YEAR WHERE HELD PREACHER MODERATOR CLERK 

1892 High Point Henry Sheets James Smith Henry Sheets 

1893 Kernersville R. T. Bryan James Smith Henry Sheets 

1894 Holloways R. Vandeventor James Smith Henry Sheets 

1895 Pleasant Grove J. M. Hilliard James Smith Henry Sheets 

1896 Denton Henry Sheets James Smith Henry Sheets 

1897... 5 Piney Grove W. H. Rich Jamea Smith Henry Sheets 

1898 Rich Fork J. H. Lambeth James Smith Henry Sheets 

1899 Abbotts Creek S. B. Wilson James Smith H<mry Sheets 

1900 Reeds X Roads W. H. Rich James Smith Henry Sheets 

1901 Lexington C. A. G. Thomas James Smieh Henry Sheets 

1902 Lick Creek Henry Sheets James Smith Henry Sheets 

1903 Jersey W. A. Smith James Smith Henry Sheets 

1904. ..2 Pine Meeting H. ...Geo. P. Harrill Jamee Smith Henry Sheets 

1905 New Friendship John R. Miller James Smith Henry Sheets 

1906 Thomasville J. S. Farmer James Smith Henry Sheets 

1907 Wallburg R. T. Vann J. W. Nowell P. S. Vann 

1908 Denton M. L. Kesler J. W. Nowell P. S. Vann 

1909 Liberty S. D Swaim Henry Sheets P. S. Vann 

1910 Orphanage O. A. Keller Henry Sheets P. S. Vann 

1911. .....Abbotts Creek G. A. Martin Henry Sheets P. S. Vann 

1912 Stoners Grove O. A. Keller Henry Sheets P. S. Vann 

1913 Rich Fork M. L. Kesler Henry Sheets P. S. Vann 

1914 Holloways G. A, Martin G. A. Martin Henry Sheets 

1915 Center Hill O. A. Keller O. A. Keller Henry Sheets 

1916 Wallburg I. M. Mercer O. A. Kelier Henry Sheets 

1917 Smitn Grove Fred D. Hale R. S. Green Henry Sheets 

1918 Lexington M. L. Kesler R. S. Green : Archibald Johnsor 

1919 Denton R. E. White R. S. Green Archibald Johnson 

1920 New Friendship J. S. Hardaway R. S, Green Archibald Johnsonl 

1921 Churchland M. L. Kesler R. S. Green Archbiald Johnsoni 

1922 Summerville W. A. Hough R. S. Green Paul C. Newton 

1923 Abbotts Creek W. L. Barrs Archibald JohnBon Paul C. Newton 

1924 Reeds G. H. Trueblood Archibald Johnson Sam J. Smith 

1925 Liberty C. A. Owens Archibald Johnson Sam J. Smith 

1926 Rich Fork E. N. Gardner Archibald Johnson Sam J. Smith 

1927 Thomasville H. T. Penry Archibald Johnson Sam J. Smith 

1928 Holloways M. L. Kesler Archibald Johnson Sam J. Smith 

1929 Stoners Grove J. M. Hays Archibald Johnson Sam J. Smith 

1930 Abbotts Creek M. L. Kelser Archibald Johnson Sam J. Smith 

1931 Denton M. O. Alexander G. Wilson Miller Sam J. Smith 

1932 Lexington G. A. Martin G. Wilson Miller Sam J. Smith 

1933 Lick Creek E. F. Mumford G. Wilson Miller Sam J. Smith 

1934 Jersey W. L. Warfford G. Wilson Miller Sam J. Smith 

j935 Mills Home E. C Roach R. D. Covington Sam J. Smith 

1936 Reeds J. A. Neilson R. D. Covington Sam J. Smith 

1937 Churchland W. K. McGee R. D. Covington Sam J. Smith 

j938 Denton John A. McMillian G. Wilson Miller Sam J. Smith 

1939 Wallburg H. M. Stroup R. D. Covington Sam J. Smith 

1940 Center Hill L. S. Gaines R. D. Covington Sam J. Smith 

1941 New Friendship N. C. Teague R. D. Covington Sam J. Smith 

1942 Abbotts Creek R. A. Herring H. M. Stroup Sam I. Smith 

1943 Lexington B. A. Mitchell H. M. Stroup Sam J. Smith 

1944 Thomasvile C. B. Atkinson H. M. Stroup A. L. Snider 

1945 Jersey V. W. Sears N. C. Teague A. L. Snider 

1946 Denton J. Roy Clifford N. C. Teague A. L. Snider 

1947 Wallburg E. F. Baker N. C. Teague A. L. Snider 

1948 Smith Grove Charles F. Leek N. C. Teague A. L. Snider 

1949 Sheets Memarial ...J. O. Walton J. O. Walton A. L. Snider 

1950 Stoners Grove C. M. Pegram J. O. Walton A. L. Snider 

Holloways 

1. Is now High Point 3. Is now Eldorado 

2. Is now Churchland 4. Is now Clemmonsville 

5. Is now Wallburg 



Map of Liberty Baptist Association 




cm 



mm